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operations 748 Views

Joined Sep 1, '17. Posts: 116 (73% Liked) Likes: 256

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  • 0

    How pathetic and juvenile. Guess they didn't cut it for med school but want to pretend that they have all this authority. Really just makes them look dumb. What does "I am the medic" mean? A medic steps into a hospital and he's the lowest one on the totem poll, because he isn't a hospital employee. Unless you are talking about "tech" medics and that means they are basically doing a job that doesn't require education.

  • 0

    Quote from Rekt
    I am aware of that, that's why I thought it was an interesting career choice to go from RN to CNA.
    Yeah. Do you feel special pointing it out when other people didnt need to? So clever. Nice catch.

  • 0

    Wording doesn't matter to me as a former pct. I'm not emotionally needy and depend on these words. What I do depend on is you to make an accurate judgement of what needs to be done and delegate appropriately. Be a manager. Delegate when it's appropriate and don't when it's not.

  • 0

    What? Are you watching them? Gross. You arent watching? Well then how do you know? Gossip and reputation slandering. How classy. Keep up the professionalism.

  • 0

    Wow, you are a fool

  • 0

    Some rude, immature posts here. Way to be professional. So proud!

    You see OP, is an overall juvinille bullying experience in nursing. It's hard to view your profession as professional when these people make up a large chunk of that profession

    The dean of the school was probably living in the past and ignorant of how innovative, necessary, and comparable online schools are. Time to keep up with the times.

  • 0

    Nah. I agree with OP. Just look at the things people say on this forum. I don't even see doctors treat each other this way. They do get nasty, but they play on the intellectual playing field, not with stupid emotional and social dramas which are highly ignorant. Better get use to it hun, and find ones that don't suffer from dunning-Kruger or adult child syndrome. They are out there and they are stellar people.

  • 0

    Quote from SurfCA40
    Lol...
    Really? That's actually pretty pathetic. If you read the post you wouldn't need to be told I was talking about CRNA. Like I literally described the role. How juvinille.

  • 1
    Ella26 likes this.

    Quote from Rekt
    CNA school is actually really easy to get into. I am surprised she worked as a RN then CNA, very interesting career choice.
    Actually it should have been CRNA school. I could not edit the post in time. Sorry lol

  • 5

    I find time to pee because I have time management skills.

    And I don't get emotionally involved with my job. A baby being born is a nice thing, but it isn't my baby, so it's not special to me.

    Seeing a beating heart is a cool experience, but I don't spend a lot of time admiring it because I have a job to do to keep it beating.

    Etc.

  • 12
  • 0

    Quote from Susie2310
    BSN level knowledge needed to take care of complex patients at a tertiary care center?? May I ask what you perceive are the components in BSN nurses education that make nurses with a BSN better qualified to take care of complex patients than ADN/Diploma nurses? I ask genuinely, as a nurse with an ADN and a BSN. You do know that nurses with an ADN/Diploma take care of complex patients? Tertiary care isn't rocket science.
    You learn ethics etc. Technically, your ticket into nursing is Nclex stamp of approval. I truly believe BSN does not make you that much better of a nurse, but it does make you more rounded professional/leader. Most hospitals don't care about BSN as much as you would think. They may request you earn the bachelors within a couple years

  • 1
    Ella26 likes this.

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Believe me, it has nothing to do with treating new grads better. These folks are boasting that they're applying to an NP program or only looking for ICU experience to get into anesthesia school before they've spent even a single day on the unit.
    Actually I just noticed this. I worked on CCU and everyone there had plans of going somewhere else. It is fine and all, but I remember one new grad that was terrible with foleys at first and always needed (me, the tech) to help or take over. Within months she is being accepted to CNA school. I had no clue they could get in that quickly... But she did, and suddenly she was the holy queen God, correcting everyone as if she was so exceptional and talented... You can manage to handle putting a tube in a bladder how you gonna manage putting one in lungs?

  • 0

    Quote from Nurse Beth
    Set a time limit (tolerable to yourself) for them to do the right thing, such as "I will wait X more number of months".

    Or a boundary, such as "The next benefited position in my unit must be offered to me" (not an outside candidate).

    This puts you in control of whether you choose to remain with this employer or look elsewhere.

    Best wishes
    I think the boundary made with the boss is definitely important. If OP can discuss something that she can hold her boss accountable to and have it in writing, she will have more leverage. And, if she must leave the job then she can tell the next employer this information which will make her look more professional. If something is explicitly discussed and agreed upon (especially in writing) and the past employer fails to come thru, it's usually very understandable to a hiring entity.

  • 12
    cleback, Salsacat, seafoamslushy, and 9 others like this.

    Honestly I think this is the future of healthcare., even medicine. Nursing is an evolving career. I believe it will intertwine more with medicine in the future and the two will become two sides of the same coin rather than the nurse being considerate lower in hierarchy.

    I want to be a bedside nurse for a while and then decide if APRN is right for me. I chose nursing over going to med school cause it makes more sense to me to not jump in as a clinician until I get experience in being in a role where I can apply my knowledge and understand the disease processess by experience. Then decide if I will love a more advanced role. I want to do that now and don't want to spend years of my life studying first only to decide medicine is not for me.

    It's strange however that this is the exact reason I am going into nursing and one of its strengths, yet some choose to skip experience which I believe is doable but really unwise. How much more confident will you be if you can first gain good "gut instincts" and thus can quickly rule out alternatives?

    I also truly believe people still tend to be ashamed of nursing. It's an attitude that it isn't a valid career. Just a stepping stone to something "respectable". Oh your an Np? I guess you are smart then, because nurses aren't smart.

    The fact that anyone would choose to be a nurse rather than a doctor if they could really baffles society. And that leads people to feel like they can't just be a nurse. They have to go do APRN and quick if they are truly "smart" . Or that if they are in nursing school, they just couldn't cut it pre med classes. Sorry, not true. I did fine in my chems, physics, and calc thank you. I did them and deserve to feel good about it. And I deserve to feel good about nursing too.


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