Latest Comments by TooterIA

Latest Comments by TooterIA

TooterIA 4,071 Views

Joined May 24, '01. Posts: 195 (13% Liked) Likes: 42

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
  • 1
    sdmwd5987 likes this.

    At my current employer, I am required to make the assignments eary. One instructor prefers the afternoon before clinicals happen the following afternoon. My clinicals start at 1330 and I have their assignment to them by 1230. The only things I really want them to have looked up before they come are meds they will give that shift. I think this teaches students better to get ready to roll with the punches. I look forward to them one day changing it to you get your assignment when you show up.

  • 0

    Whoops, I meant 3,000/month.
    We tell these patients to establish care with a Ob/Gyn until we are blue in the face, and they just dont. As far as I know, if you call, you can get in for an appointment without problems.
    Our providers very rarely type in their own info on EPIC.

  • 0

    I work in a 28 bed ED with an average of 3,000 patients/year. We see many patients with vaginal bleeding and we either confirm a miscarriage, or threatened abortion. The DC instructions these patients get are preprinted from our computer program, EPIC. They are very generic and in my opinion, not very useful.
    Can you share with me what type of DC instructions you give your patients or where I can look for info to add to ours? Many of these patients come back several times, in my opinion, because they dont receive enough education.
    Additionally, if the miscarriage is confirmed, do you have any referrals to grief groups or anything you give out? I am trying to look in my local area I can refer patients to, but online would be great.
    Thanks in advance
    Jessica

  • 0

    My coworker interviewed for one of the local NCLEX positions. She was told the class is about 5 days long. And you could not have classes for weeks, then all of a sudden have a class. So if you can afford to work very parttime or if the one in your area is busier where it would be steady, I would think it would be a good gig. But in my area, (Iowa) it just isnt regular enough to provide a paycheck, and not flexible enough to work with another job (unless you can randomly take 5 days off at a time at your other job).
    Hope that helps!

  • 0

    What does your ED do for maternal loss? We see many women who are miscarrying and all we have is discharge instructions and send them on their way, no referral for anyone they can talk to, etc. I am looking into having a packet of support numbers or anything better we can do to support these women and their families with their loss. Any ideas? ANy special certifications or classes our staff can go to?
    Thanks!!

  • 0

    I have taken TNCC.
    It is not in my facility, it is about a 3 hour drive away. So I would also be forking out money for one night in a hotel.

  • 1
    BigheartRN likes this.

    1:5? Ouch. If fully staffed, we are 1:4 and I usually run my ass off all 12 hours.
    I came from an ED that only saw about 400 pts/month to my new job where we see 3500/month. I have only been there since June and these are my tidbits.
    Dont be afraid to use your techs/CNAs/whoever you can delegate to. Your time will be better utilized assessing and providing care rather than taking the pt to the bathroom (unless no one else is available to do it, obviously).
    Chart in the room, while you are doing the work. Or you will forget.
    Double check pt labels, I have had several mislabed urines and been handed the wrong discharge instructions.
    Teamwork, teamwork, teamwork. If you have a minute, offer help to others. You will learn in a heartbeat who will help you if you helped them. By the same token, if you are busy and someone is trying to pawn off their work to you, politely decline. Dont let yourself get behind trying to do someone else's work.
    Easy ways to **** off the oncoming shift: not labeling your IV lines, leaving your rooms trashed, not having the patients in a gown.
    Multitask. You see your patient needs an IV and meds? Grab your meds and fluids, then go in to start the IV and hang meds. Going in once to start in then again a minute later to give your meds is a waste of time.
    Lastly, customer service. My patients are much easier to please and leave happier if I can grin and bear it, put on my smile, get them the glass of ice for the visitor, tuck the cover under grandma's shoulders, etc.

  • 0

    My hospital claims to be offering to pay for a CEN review course by Jeff Solheim, who I have read good things about. I would have to pay for the course, the hospital would reimburse me, the money I get back would be taxed, so I will already be out some money. It is unknown if the hospital will cover the cost of the exam itself. I have been in a very small ER for 7 years and am now in an ED that sees about 3500 pts/month, so I am seeing things I have never seen before.
    Would going to a 2 day CEN review course help my knowledge level in my everyday work? Or is it truly just a course to prepare you for the exam? I am tempted to take the course just to learn more about how to take care of ED pts, and then not take the test (or at least not until I find out if the exam cost is covered, which will be after this review course is already over)
    Thanks for any insight
    Jessica

  • 0

    We go live in November, I am very interested to read the replies!


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