Returning to work from maternity leave

  1. 0
    I have been off work for 14 months now. I had a baby girl Oct 05. I am going back to my previous employer either this week or next week. Its a rural hospital, that doesn't take super sick patients. No chest-tubes or vents or anything like that. I have worked med-surg for one year before taking my leave. I am going back very part-time, from 7pm-1130pm twice a week. Does anyone have any words of wisdom for my return? I will not be receiving any orientation since I am not "new" to the hospital or to med-surg nursing. I have never worked these hours before, I always worked night shift (11p-7a). Can you share your routine from 7pm-1130pm? The normal shift runs 7p-7am. (there used to 8 hr shifts, recently changed to 12's.) But I am obviously only doing the whole shift. Thank you for any words of wisdom!
  2. 10 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    That is the time that the patient's are getting settled down for sleep. Last calls to doctors need to be made for sleepers or pain medication. Also, the ERs tend to start dumping out patients around 10 and 11pm to clear their beds for the night, so the medical floors tend to get admissions around those times.
  4. 0
    Quote from Daytonite
    That is the time that the patient's are getting settled down for sleep. Last calls to doctors need to be made for sleepers or pain medication. Also, the ERs tend to start dumping out patients around 10 and 11pm to clear their beds for the night, so the medical floors tend to get admissions around those times.
    Thank you!!!
  5. 0
    You may want to think about doing one eight hour shift a week, if it's possible. 4 hour shifts are insane. You have to have just as much done in 4 hours as eight. If something goes bad, it's almost impossible to get caught back up,
  6. 0
    Quote from NurseyBaby'05
    You may want to think about doing one eight hour shift a week, if it's possible. 4 hour shifts are insane. You have to have just as much done in 4 hours as eight. If something goes bad, it's almost impossible to get caught back up,
    I am concerned about that. But... I am still bfing. I know I won't get a break (its always so busy) so I know I wouldn't be able to pump while there. Thats why I chose the 2 four hour shifts. That way I know I won't have to go more than 5 hours. I really wish I could do 1 eight hour shift instead!
  7. 0
    Hey, if the smokers can make time to smoke, you can make time to do what you have to. That's what I plan on pointing out the minute someone gives me grief about pumping. I certainly understand that if there's an emergency, I may not get to once in awhile, but I'm not lettting it be an everyday thing. Surely someone can keep an eye on our patients for twenty minutes once a shift.
  8. 0
    Quote from NurseyBaby'05
    Hey, if the smokers can make time to smoke, you can make time to do what you have to. That's what I plan on pointing out the minute someone gives me grief about pumping. I certainly understand that if there's an emergency, I may not get to once in awhile, but I'm not lettting it be an everyday thing. Surely someone can keep an eye on our patients for twenty minutes once a shift.
    I thought about the smokers several breaks per shift, too. Almost all of the other nurses smoke. (I do not) They do go outside for 10 minutes about 3-4 times during an 8 hour shift. I know they wouldn't say anything for awhile, but I would plan on pumping for the next several months. (until dd is 2, she is now 14.5 months old) It takes me 20 minutes to pump, and an extra 2 minutes to set up and put stuff away. So I would need a 25 minute break once a shift. I don't really know how that would go over long term. That is one thing about nursing that sucks. So many jobs expect you to not actually take your lunch break, and just eat while you chart. If I worked in an office (like my dh who is an engineer) pumping would not be an issue at all.
  9. 0
    It would have to go over or else they can put a stop to their smoke breaks as well; especially if you don't get paid for your lunch breaks. You should not be expected to donate 30 minutes of your time to the hospital every shift you work. I'll bet if you start filling out the paper work to get paid for your lunch that you don't take every shift, you'll start getting a lot of encouragement to take your breaks.
  10. 0
    I worked in a very busy med/surg unit as an extern when I was a student nurse, and one of the nurses there managed to pump three times a day. It CAN be done. We had a crazy-busy unit, but if smokers can make time to smoke, breastfeeding moms can have time to pump. Don't give up.
  11. 0
    I did exactly what you are doing for the exact same reasons. Four hour shifts are hairy but it can be done. FWIW 3-7 is a better four hour portion but I dont know if that is an option for you. 7p-11 is heavy because at least at our hospital you have to pick up another pt at 7p, plus you have night meds, the second of the BID dressing changes, TPN (though you may not have this if the patients arent that sick) and you have to address all the issues that magically appear once pt's visitors leave etc. You will run your heiney off, you wont have time to chat with coworkers about the baby etc. You seriously go in there with your skates on! I usually am writing meds down, checking vitals, new orders and skimming the last progress note as I wait for report. I do my assessment for all patients, then put in calls to docs at the same time. I try to get a bit of charting done. I get night meds together and then pass meds and proceed with new orders. After meds/ dressing changes are done I get caught up on charting. Then voila ..your shift is over...its crazy, you feel like you just got there. The nice thing about my facility is they have a policy that four hour shifts do not get admissions (doesnt always happen but I was sure to keep that policy handy in case I deemed the assignment unfair.) Some days are just crazy and I dont mind doing what I can to pitch in, ya know. Even though the four hour shifts were crazy, it was nice to have the adult interaction.

    BTW--Yay to you for breastfeeding this long.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top