Newbie - page 2

by FLmed | 3,355 Views | 21 Comments

Hi! I just wanted to say hello. I graduated nursing school in May, and I passed NCLEX RN in June. I feel very fortunate to have secured a job on a Med/Surg floor. I am hoping to be an active member on this board. Some of you... Read More


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    [color=#003300]karin! [color=#003300]congrats on passing the nclex and the new job, too!
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    Welcome to the dark side. Med/Surg nurses ROCK, btw.

    Good luck and please keep us posted on your new adventure!
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    Here's a worry that I have: IV insertion. My school in Philadelphia didn't teach us anything about it aside from how to look for infiltrations. We didn't get to practice in school because of "liability" (is this normal throughout the country?), and we're supposed to learn on the job. I'm VERY nervous; I can't imagine patients are going to be thrilled about guinea pigging for me. I've been watching videos and tourniqueting myself and family members to palpate for veins and spot where valves are so I can avoid them, but still, it's nerve racking.
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    Tstorm, thanks for the note. Congrats to you, as well!! :-) How awesome that you will be in the ICU. What a great opportunity for you. GitanoRN-- you have such a great personality. Thanks so much for the awesome, encouraging note. It is appreciated more than you know!!! Nursel56-- thanks for kudos!!! :-) Tokmom, I have to admit that I love your posts. I'm a big fan of yours!!! :-) I really appreciate the note. Alibee, I completely understand how you feel about the IV sticks. I can only imagine your anxiety. I was able to practice them my last semester in nursing school. I wanted to get really good at them because I would like to eventually end up in the ED or in surgery. So, I made it one of my objectives to initiate venipuncture whenever an opportunity presented itself. This was my objective for my preceptorship. I did get 10 opportunities, and I made 7 out of 10. I would encourage you to read over your procedure manual, keep watching the videos, ask a friend or family member if you can practice on them, and get really comfortable with the steps. I would also only try for ones that you really think you can get for your first couple attempts. This will give you great practice and also instill confidence in you. There's definitely a skill to it and some are better than others. I am hoping to get my success ratio up to at least 80%. You'll get it. You got through nursing school, right? I called my nursing school RN Boot Camp. It was no joke. Oh my goodness gracious. Also, I never told my first patient that they were the first REAL person that I did. So, they don't need to know that they are your guinnea pig. I did venipuncture in school on a dummy (I guess the political term is mannequin) before performing it on a real human being. If you did the same, than you have done venipuncture before and you don't have to lie to your patients that you have done it before.
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    Quote from alibee
    Here's a worry that I have: IV insertion. My school in Philadelphia didn't teach us anything about it aside from how to look for infiltrations. We didn't get to practice in school because of "liability" (is this normal throughout the country?), and we're supposed to learn on the job. I'm VERY nervous; I can't imagine patients are going to be thrilled about guinea pigging for me. I've been watching videos and tourniqueting myself and family members to palpate for veins and spot where valves are so I can avoid them, but still, it's nerve racking.
    We were able to stick during school, my first was my 2nd semester (and I got it!) but still I'm nervous to do it on the job without that student title to fall back on I also think that they have IV insertion as part of our orientation. Good luck!1
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    Congratulations on your accomplishments! Only those of us in the medical field understand how much effort and dedication it takes to survive and make it through school and boards. I too graduated in May, passed boards in June and will start my new job in Aug. in med/surg. I practiced on dummy arms for IV insertions and was fortunate to do many venipunctures in clinicals and preceptorship. I always try to go for the bigger vessels since I am still new to it. Look on YouTube for good techiniques for rolling vessels. I found these vessels more difficult to puncture. Practice, practice, practice and you will be doing it like a pro in no time! Good luck with your new career!
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    Quote from karinfla
    Tstorm, thanks for the note. Congrats to you, as well!! :-) How awesome that you will be in the ICU. What a great opportunity for you. GitanoRN-- you have such a great personality. Thanks so much for the awesome, encouraging note. It is appreciated more than you know!!! Nursel56-- thanks for kudos!!! :-) Tokmom, I have to admit that I love your posts. I'm a big fan of yours!!! :-) I really appreciate the note. Alibee, I completely understand how you feel about the IV sticks. I can only imagine your anxiety. I was able to practice them my last semester in nursing school. I wanted to get really good at them because I would like to eventually end up in the ED or in surgery. So, I made it one of my objectives to initiate venipuncture whenever an opportunity presented itself. This was my objective for my preceptorship. I did get 10 opportunities, and I made 7 out of 10. I would encourage you to read over your procedure manual, keep watching the videos, ask a friend or family member if you can practice on them, and get really comfortable with the steps. I would also only try for ones that you really think you can get for your first couple attempts. This will give you great practice and also instill confidence in you. There's definitely a skill to it and some are better than others. I am hoping to get my success ratio up to at least 80%. You'll get it. You got through nursing school, right? I called my nursing school RN Boot Camp. It was no joke. Oh my goodness gracious. Also, I never told my first patient that they were the first REAL person that I did. So, they don't need to know that they are your guinnea pig. I did venipuncture in school on a dummy (I guess the political term is mannequin) before performing it on a real human being. If you did the same, than you have done venipuncture before and you don't have to lie to your patients that you have done it before.
    Gee thanks. I'm honored.
  8. 0
    Quote from alibee
    Here's a worry that I have: IV insertion. My school in Philadelphia didn't teach us anything about it aside from how to look for infiltrations. We didn't get to practice in school because of "liability" (is this normal throughout the country?), and we're supposed to learn on the job. I'm VERY nervous; I can't imagine patients are going to be thrilled about guinea pigging for me. I've been watching videos and tourniqueting myself and family members to palpate for veins and spot where valves are so I can avoid them, but still, it's nerve racking.
    Really, don't kill yourself with worry. You would be surprised of the nurses that don't know how to start IV's. If you land a job at a facility with an IV team, you will have little to zero opportunity to start them.
    We don't have an IV team and nurses coming to our facility are clueless. Their skills long gone.
    Practice does make perfect and I'm sure you will become proficient quickly.

    My tip for the newbie IV starter is never let the pt know you are using them as a guinea pig. Even if you are shaking in your boots, don't let it show, lol. Go in with confidence and you will do fine.
  9. 0
    Congrats!
  10. 0
    Thank you, JJones. I'm feeling the love! It's very appreciated.


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