LPN's starting/infusing IV's.

  1. 0
    Hello, been a while since I last posted on this BB. Hope this finds you all in good health and doing well. This is in regards to new standards of LPN functions in South Dakota.

    "In July 2000, the Administrative Rules of South Dakota were changed to incorporate the functions of initiation and administration of IV therapy into the basic role of the LPN. As of 2001, the graduates of the LPN programs in South Dakota will have these skills upon graduation. Currently practicing LPN's who were educated prior to 2001 and who have not had training in the initiation and administration of IV therapy do not have this skill as part of their scope of practice. As a result, those individuals must obtain this knowledge and these skills prior to their performance of IV therapy functions."-South Dakota Board of Nursing

    I graduated in 1998, and am currently working in Med/Surg in a VA hospital. Working with LPN's and RN's, we carry very different roles. Depending on each individuals' "step/grade", depends on their scope of practice and role. It has been the ONLY difference, skill wise, between RN and LPN... the starting and infusing of IV's. Now we are to learn this, apply this and still be treated and paid as aids. Hmmm, I can see the good and the bad sides to this. I want to get my RN degree and I know this will only facilitate me in that process, however, I don't know that I feel all that comfortable being responsible for IV's on top of all the other pt care I am responsible for. Typically I have anywhere from 3-8 pts, and typically 1-2 of them would keep me very busy during a 8hr shift. As a LPN I have a 'resourse nurse' (RN) who is responsible for assessments and IV's and perhaps a couple pts. I pass PO meds, incision, drain, etc cares, ADL's, etc, etc for my pts. I am nervous about this new task at hand, the unknown is always unnerving. I know that I can do it and will do it, it is just change and change is just that. What are your thoughts on this subject? No LPN's don't have the 'critical thinking' teaching that RN's have, but now new LPN's are being taught more and more into that scope of practice, just not the RN pay scale...employers are getting a skilled work force for immigrant pay. Just my thinking at this moment, tommorrow I may change my mind! lol Anyhow, ya'll have a good day.

    -Jodie

    [This message has been edited by Jo_deye_yuh (edited January 31, 2001).]

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  2. 10 Comments...

  3. 0
    Comments, ideas?
  4. 0
    Originally posted by Jo_deye_yuh:
    Comments, ideas?
    Jo-deye-yuh - I am also an LPN ,who works at a VA hospital in North Carolina - When I graduated from nursing scool in 1992 , it was the first class of LPN's that were required to be I.V. certified . Where I work I have {if doing meds that day } always had to hang my own IV's , blood , ect. - The only thing LPN's don't do that RN's do is central lines and IV pushes. You just get used to it . However most of the time if I am the med nurse it's for half the unit and don't have a pt. care assignment .Sometimes we do primary care where I would do both meds and pt. care for just 5-6 pt's.

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  5. 0
    ucavalpn~ Thank you for your response! If you have any other ideas or information you can share, I would greatly appreciate it.
  6. 0
    I should have said , in my earlier post that the major difference between a LPN and RN is the level of responsibility .
    About starting IV's, it is not that hard . Mostly just a matter of practice.As you said it is change . Change can be fun .I love learning something new .Good luck to you .

    I don't think nurses in general are paid enough. But I do make a little more than
    imigrant labor .Just got a raise!

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  7. 0
    I.V. therapy is not really a big deal, and should be done by an LPN... after all, an LPN is a nurse too. I know this seems like a big change, but it's not that big. I wouldn't have been able to work in my ER had I not gotten the IV therapy certification. Get your RN, and none of this will be an issue. Good luck to you.
  8. 0
    I work in a small hospital (approx 90 beds)in Va. The LPN's do everything that the RN's do except admit patients. They start IV's, do IV push meds, hang blood, etc.The major difference is the pay.
  9. 0
    I agree with both sides of this. If LPNs are going to do IV's and other RN (jobs) then we should get more $$$$. I agree that LPN's are capable of doing these jobs and I agree that the training should be in the schooling of LPN's. My mother was a LPN for 30 years and she lived through the LPN starting to pass meds. she put up the same fight. But as you can see the wages of LPN- RN have not changed much with that increased responsibility! I am afraid that the new skill demanded of us (IV's) will not help us receive the proper wages either. All nurses are underpaid for what we do and under benefited! I am presently looking for a course to take for IV cert. I have been an LPN for 17 years and I love it. I work in geriatrics and am a Restorative Co. I am considered a nurse manager and have to take call every 5 weeks and think that IV skills would be helpful in my job. Does anyone know of any courses offered in Ohio. Cleveland area. Sandi
  10. 0
    Mysti~ I agree with you! But that is the field we are in! A field of oxymorons...a field of healing/caring mixed with 'better-than-thou-isms' and injustice.

    I relish the opportunities that are coming my way, and know they will only benefit me,(and others). Yes it gripes me to no end, having had it stressed and crammed down our throats for years..."That is why RN's get paid the big bucks, they do IV's". Well now why? No, money is NOT everything, but there is principle to this. I have been told by RN students and RN instructors (the hospital I work at is an educational facility), that the current LPN program in my state is a condensed form of the 2yr RN program...not easier...in fact more difficult. 2yrs of information, education and learning crammed into 12months. Theory, principles, skills, treatments, diagnosis, etc etc etc included.

    Mysti, I would recommend looking into your local hospitals, colleges, and other medical facilities. Many are incorporating an IV certification class or can offer information to you on how to get one started within your workplace.

    Best of luck!
    Health and Blessings~ Jodie
  11. 0
    Originally posted by Jo_deye_yuh:
    Hello, been a while since I last posted on this BB. Hope this finds you all in good health and doing well. This is in regards to new standards of LPN functions in South Dakota.

    "In July 2000, the Administrative Rules of South Dakota were changed to incorporate the functions of initiation and administration of IV therapy into the basic role of the LPN. As of 2001, the graduates of the LPN programs in South Dakota will have these skills upon graduation. Currently practicing LPN's who were educated prior to 2001 and who have not had training in the initiation and administration of IV therapy do not have this skill as part of their scope of practice. As a result, those individuals must obtain this knowledge and these skills prior to their performance of IV therapy functions."-South Dakota Board of Nursing

    I graduated in 1998, and am currently working in Med/Surg in a VA hospital. Working with LPN's and RN's, we carry very different roles. Depending on each individuals' "step/grade", depends on their scope of practice and role. It has been the ONLY difference, skill wise, between RN and LPN... the starting and infusing of IV's. Now we are to learn this, apply this and still be treated and paid as aids. Hmmm, I can see the good and the bad sides to this. I want to get my RN degree and I know this will only facilitate me in that process, however, I don't know that I feel all that comfortable being responsible for IV's on top of all the other pt care I am responsible for. Typically I have anywhere from 3-8 pts, and typically 1-2 of them would keep me very busy during a 8hr shift. As a LPN I have a 'resourse nurse' (RN) who is responsible for assessments and IV's and perhaps a couple pts. I pass PO meds, incision, drain, etc cares, ADL's, etc, etc for my pts. I am nervous about this new task at hand, the unknown is always unnerving. I know that I can do it and will do it, it is just change and change is just that. What are your thoughts on this subject? No LPN's don't have the 'critical thinking' teaching that RN's have, but now new LPN's are being taught more and more into that scope of practice, just not the RN pay scale...employers are getting a skilled work force for immigrant pay. Just my thinking at this moment, tommorrow I may change my mind! lol Anyhow, ya'll have a good day.

    -Jodie

    [This message has been edited by Jo_deye_yuh (edited January 31, 2001).]
    Jodie
    I understand your concern, but look at it this way. Anything you can do to further you nursing abilities is not only good for you, but your patients as well. About 12 years ago I was working in a large ER in Arkansas and loved it. The hospital decided to train all LPN'S in IV therapy and administration. The training was held on the hospital campus and consisted of 5 weeks of 8 hour daily classes. At the end of this 5 weeks we were qualified to push 31 IV drugs and start IV lines. Over the years this increased to 41 drugs. These drugs, their generic and brand names, side effects, administration time, contraindications, ETC, were drilled into us. You knew all the drugs or you failed the course. Now 12 years later I have moved to SC and feel like I have been demoted. The hospital I work in is so far behind in everything I think I have stepped back in time. I am not allowed to do all the things I have been trained for. A few days ago management became very excited about allowing us to step up by levels. All we have to do is complete training in selected modules and can work up to an LPN 5. When I hired in, (it will be a year in June) the personal manager checked my references, copied my certificates, and gave me a badge with LPN 5 inprinted on. Two weeks later I was given a new badge with simply LPN. I have proven by documentation that I have already accomplished everything I need and more. Yet I have to be very careful in my daily work not to do something I have done for years, because it may not be acceptable here. Get all the free training you can get. Someday hospitals and boards will realize there is a group of very well trained and competant nurses out there called LPN's.



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