Is there a slower paced floor to work at in the hospital? Is there a slower paced floor to work at in the hospital? - pg.2 | allnurses

Is there a slower paced floor to work at in the hospital? - page 2

I'm working in med/surg now and it seems crazy but i'm overwhelmed most days. I'm a new grad but maybe this just means nursing is not for me however I really love it. Do you have a suggestion of a... Read More

  1. Visit  Florencebyondthepale profile page
    0
    Someone mentioned oncology as a less hectic unit and I have to disagree. It is q4 vitals with patients on chemo and radiation. Strict i/o's. Patient's typically spend at least 30 days on the unit for their first round of chemo and often deteriorate as the chemo progresses. Patients with advanced cancer can often be total care and have wound care, fistula's, ostomies and trachs. Sickle cell patients in crisis are also generally placed on the oncology unit. Pain management is a huge concern. And in my unit we took med/surg overflow if we were not full. You also have to be ready to deal with emotional concerns, particularly depression. And because the patients often stay on the unit for so long and/or come back for repeat treatment it is easy to get attached. You get to know their families and friends and it can be especially devastating when someone doesn't make it. There is no predicting who lives and who survives with cancer. I have seen a 17 year old patient die while a 70 year old who is riddled with disease and near comatose suddenly perk up and start talking and asking to eat. Needless to say, it is both physically and emotionally draining. I am in awe of nurses who choose oncology and stick with it for their career.
    Last edit by Florencebyondthepale on Apr 16, '11 : Reason: grammatical error
  2. Visit  MaueeBoiFlava profile page
    0
    check MENTAL HOSPITALS for DEPRESSION UNIT. I am sure everything there should be slow.
  3. Visit  Mommy TeleRN profile page
    0
    I think some of it depends on the hospital and how they staff various units. I float and there are some floors that tend to be better staffed and have a 5:1 ratio instead of 6:1 and they are a little easier. Stepdown can be easier depending on how it's set up.. they aren't as sick as ICU usually and you have 3-4 patients.
    I find ICU a little slower pace than the floor. I have so much more time to spend with each patient and can learn more about them. You have so many nurses around it's easier to get help like pulling up the patient, bathing, toileting and you usually have plenty of RT's and often docs around (esp in a teaching hospital) at night than on the floor. The docs to me seem like they listen better and are generally more helpful in the unit, they tend to know about the patient and what is going on, monitoring their labs and things themselves a little more frequently as the ICU pt requires more frequent changes in the plan of care.
    My hospital used to have a chest pain center and I really liked that.... you are doing the same type of thing all the time and it's easy to have a routine. Although you'd occ have someone unstable it was pretty easy to get a doc on the scene.
  4. Visit  qt_rn profile page
    0
    I work on a chronic care/transitional care unit (people that aren't quite ready for rehab). This floor recently changed from chronic care and slow stream rehab. I have to say that while more physically demanding, I find the chronic care and transitional are typically "slower" than the medical floors in my hospital as well as slower than when we had the slow stream rehab on our floor too.

    I am a new grad as well, been working for a year, and I have found chronic care to be a better learning experience than I thought when I took the job. Lots of trach care, feeding tubes, we do peritoneal dialysis, tpn, we do a bit of everything. We do primary care on our floor (as do most of the floors in hospitals in our area) so we are staffed 4:1 on days and 7:1 on nights.
    Our patients are mostly medically stable although we do have acute medical issues arise, not as frequently as on a medical floor. Medical is great experience but if your finding it to be too overwhelming maybe something like chronic care would be good for you.

    During a day shift, we often have a lull in the afternoon when patients are napping, there are no meds to pass and the bells slow down a lot. It gives us time to do most of our charting, start writing our report, and stock things and do the extras. On nights we often have a good 4 hours where things are quiet. So it is rare for us to leave our shift late unless something happens near the end of the shift.

    I am going on maternity leave soon and when I go back to work next year I plan on moving to a medical floor if I can just because I feel its time to challenge myself some more, but for a new nurse I think its a great place to start!

    Hope you can find something that is the right fit for you!
    Last edit by qt_rn on Apr 16, '11 : Reason: just forgot to add about downtime
  5. Visit  himilayaneyes profile page
    0
    I'm sorry, but you won't find it easier no matter what unit you go to. That's just part of being a new nurse. And in no way would I say that ICU is any easier than the floor. ICU requires more thinking since the patients are so much more complex where as on the floor there's a lot more of just doing things to do them (gotta pass the meds, sometimes you're so busy you barely have a chance to look up labs). Plus, I guess it depends what type of ICU you work in. Trauma icu is definitely not easy, but the patient ratios are much better than the floor. Give it a year and it'll be better. Hang in there.
  6. Visit  MandaRN94 profile page
    1
    My advice is get out of acute hospital nursing. There are many jobs available in clinic settings or public health that are much slower paced (but not less work). Not everyone has to "put in their time in Med/surg" as new grad RN. If you don't like it get out or you will burn out. If you really want to stay in the hospital I recommend the maternity floor. You still get to use acute nursing skills but will be less stressful. I worked on busy L&D floor that often hired new grads. The ones that found it too stressful or too fast paced were transferred to postpartum and they loved it. What interested you in nursing school?
    hakunamatataRN likes this.
  7. Visit  GRUNGE profile page
    0
    i started ND STILL AM IN THE REHAB UNIT. THIS IS A VERY GOOD PLACE TO GAIN YOUR BEARING
  8. Visit  alalani3 profile page
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    I was just wondering how this worked out for you? I am a new nurse now and am going through the same thing. I feel that it's not that I do not like the job. I just think that I do not have enough time to complete everything I need to complete. I am dedicated and I am not the only nurse who ends up staying 2 hours to chart. Many of the experienced nurses are right there with me. This tells me that we have too much to do in so little time. I am afraid that things can be missed or done incorrectly in such a rush. We don't have the time to spend with the patients as we would like to. This is not how it should be. I do not believe that the ratio should be any higher than 5:1. There is simply too much to do and we need the time to do it accurately. How do you feel about nursing now that you are experienced? What did you decide to do at that point? I am just wondering how it turned out for you.
  9. Visit  Pangea Reunited profile page
    0
    Quote from alalani3
    I was just wondering how this worked out for you? I am a new nurse now and am going through the same thing. I feel that it's not that I do not like the job. I just think that I do not have enough time to complete everything I need to complete. I am dedicated and I am not the only nurse who ends up staying 2 hours to chart. Many of the experienced nurses are right there with me. This tells me that we have too much to do in so little time. I am afraid that things can be missed or done incorrectly in such a rush. We don't have the time to spend with the patients as we would like to. This is not how it should be. I do not believe that the ratio should be any higher than 5:1. There is simply too much to do and we need the time to do it accurately. How do you feel about nursing now that you are experienced? What did you decide to do at that point? I am just wondering how it turned out for you.
    The OP hasn't been by since 2012, so don't hold your breath.
  10. Visit  nutella profile page
    0
    I interviewed at a large psych hospital some while ago and while the pace seemed decent enough - the pay was horrible - so no go...
  11. Visit  RNinIN profile page
    1
    Quote from nutella
    I interviewed at a large psych hospital some while ago and while the pace seemed decent enough - the pay was horrible - so no go...
    Pay isn't everything. Believe me. The highest paying jobs were the worst, and for a reason. The worst, treated like a queen with excellent tangible and intangible benefits
    LPN-RN17 likes this.

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