First RN job: Med Surg/Renal... ADVICE!!!!!

  1. 0
    Hello every1.... I am new to allnurse and to introduce myself. I graduated nursing school. aug '11 and got my license Jan 26. I just got a job on a med surg renal floor. The nurse manager told me that nurse to patient ratio is 1:5 & that 1:6 is rare. I am extremely nervous because I have read a lot of post in here and had nurses tell me that from their experience they hate med surg. I know I cant make their experience my own, but what advice can you give me about working a med surg floor. I havent practiced since July '11 and feel so bent out of shape with everything I learned. Plz help thank yu
  2. 4,094 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 6 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I work Med/Surg - no specialty unit. We get EVERYTHING AND ANYTHING! It is a very fast-paced environment. With adequate orientation, you should be fine. Hang in there. There will be times you will get discouraged (because you are new and you have lots to learn). You will gain a huge amount of experience and knowledge starting out on a Med/Surg unit. Renal is a good place to start as you will have patients with many common preexisting problems, such as diabetes, hypertension, heart disease -- the list goes on and on. Go in with a positive attitude...watch your preceptor....ASK, ASK, ASK questions!! GOOD LUCK!
  5. 0
    Med/Surg can be a chosen career. It doesn't have to be the 'starting' point to something bigger and better.

    Now with that being said. I have friends who have hated ICU, ED, OB, etc....

    I have worked all different departments over the years and I keep returning to med/surg. Gasp...I like it! I like it so much I'm certified in it.

    Give it a try. You will learn tons. If you want to go somewhere else and try something different you will have it as a background. Or..you could decide you like it and stay. Go in with an open mind. Good luck.
  6. 1
    I work on a Med/Surg/Renal floor and love it. It's very busy, not uncommon to have seven patients apiece. The learning curve can be a bit steep at first, because there is so much to learn. I've been there for a year and am just finally starting to feel really comfortable and confident. Good luck to you, as others have said, ask a lot of questions, and don't waste a minute of downtime to catch up. You'll do great, congrats!
    tokmom likes this.
  7. 0
    I appreciate this advice because I am starting on a Med/Surg floor Monday- I will go through orientation first but start working with my preceptor the 2nd week. I am coming from a dialysis clinic and this is my second job as a RN. I am really nervous but am looking forward to a new opportunity.
  8. 0
    Thank you guys for the advice. For a while there I thought I wasnt gonna get any lol. I am so nervous because nursing is fast paced and I feel like my brain moves in slow motion. I go for a physical may 2 and then may 7 I begin orientation. Im scared they will ask me things I dont know since I have been out of school since aug.
  9. 0
    Quote from ILove2Shop
    Thank you guys for the advice. For a while there I thought I wasnt gonna get any lol. I am so nervous because nursing is fast paced and I feel like my brain moves in slow motion. I go for a physical may 2 and then may 7 I begin orientation. Im scared they will ask me things I dont know since I have been out of school since aug.
    I recently got hired as a med-surge nurse! I too am a new grad! I am quite nervous as well. But reading your post.. It's good to know I am not alone, in being scared nervous

    Anyway, good luck with your orientation!!!

    I know I'm a new grad too. but my last clinical I had a preceptorship on a med-surge floor, and also had an externship..and the main thing to remember is.. ASK QUESTIONS. don't be afraid to speak up. And if you are uncomfortable with a situation or need more help with something, be sure to voice it to your preceptor or another nurse on the floor. you are new.. so nobody expects you to know everything.

    the first couple months are crucial... so asking questions and understanding the protocols, are important!


Top