Trying to make a decision

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    Dear fellow future nurses,

    I would like help with a decision. Knowing that the ADN vs. BSN debate has raged on for decades, I do not wish to contribute to the debate. There are pros and cons to both and often, life circumstances choose for us. I simply am inquiring about your opinion on the best option for me as there are clear pros and cons to choosing either for myself as well.

    I have applied to two programs: an ADN program at the local junior college, and a BSN program at the nearest university to me. Of course, in the grand scheme of things with money being no object, the BSN would be favorable since both programs are the same length (2 years). But the BSN is a 90 minute commute one way (at least)! It could be two hours or more if traffic is bad and it would be 3 hours minimum using public transportation. I've just been accepted to the ADN program. I'm still waiting to hear back from the BSN. Should I be accepted to the BSN, moving closer to the university is not a possibility as I am a wife and mother and my husband's job, my son's school (not to mention our mortgage!) keeps us in our current location. Now that you have the background info, I am asking you which program you would choose if you were in my shoes. Would you spring for the BSN, suffering through the crazy commute for two years (summers off at least, so there are built-in breaks) to just get it done, also knowing you're getting the benefit of a nationally ranked program and a more thorough education (since the BSN includes a few classes that the ADN does not)? OR, would you be practical, choose the local ADN and not wear yourself out on the road and do a bridge program later knowing that the bridge program ups the cost and time involved in eventually getting the BSN (which is the end goal for now; eventually I'll get a master's too but that's far in the future)?

    I have waivered back and forth for months on which program is my first choice due to all the variables involved and I simply cannot decide. I want to make a good decision not just for myself, but also my family.
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  3. 5 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    My apologies for the salutation. I thought I posted this on the Maryland State Nursing Programs forum and was speaking to mostly student nurses and future student nurses. Perhaps the mix-up was fate though and current nurses can give me some advice as well on what they would do. I appreciate all of your input.
  5. 0
    I can truly understand your dilemma. A 90 minute commute is very hard, especially with school, studying and your home responsibilities. I just completed an RN-BSN bridge online and am now starting my MSN-FNP online program. I chose the online courses because my only options are close to the same drive time as yours. Yes, the cost of online schools are a little more, but many state schools are now offering online classes which helps big time with the cost. If it were me, I would opt to do the ADN program close to home, then move into a bridge program. During my bridge program, many students were new ADN grads that did just that. Good luck in which ever option you choose.
  6. 1
    Do the ASN. I was in your same position except I had a newborn. DH and I paid for the education on cash and 6 months into my first job my paychecks covered my degree.
    I got a fantastic education (PGCC) and have employer funded options to pursue a higher degree. Yes, it will take longer, but we have no debt, which means many things including I can make job decisions based on other factors than just money.
    I also feel that you get out what you put into it. I busted my ass and tool advantage of every opportunity for extra education and networking.

    Excuse my typos, I have a sleeping baby on me- typing with my thumb.
    MusicToMedicine likes this.
  7. 0
    I've done the thumb/one-finger typing before, ERKsome! I totally get it Thank you for your reply.
  8. 0
    Quote from ERksome
    Do the ASN. I was in your same position except I had a newborn. DH and I paid for the education on cash and 6 months into my first job my paychecks covered my degree.
    I got a fantastic education (PGCC) and have employer funded options to pursue a higher degree. Yes, it will take longer, but we have no debt, which means many things including I can make job decisions based on other factors than just money.
    I also feel that you get out what you put into it. I busted my ass and tool advantage of every opportunity for extra education and networking.

    Excuse my typos, I have a sleeping baby on me- typing with my thumb.
    Could you give some insight to what the program was like as well as the application process?

    I'm going to begin pre-reqs (if I can online this summer) then in-class courses the following spring.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.


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