is anybody applying to umd and what are ur gpas - page 3

I 've already applied to Umaryland (BSN program) and i have a GPA of 3.0. I am currently taking micro which im getting an A. This would raise my GPA to 3.05 . I had a B in A&P 1,C in A&P2,C in chem... Read More

  1. by   clhRN2b2010
    That's really helpful. I will ask specific questions about that next week. It is helpful to know that way ahead because I have children to get to school and day care and 6:30 is wayyy early. School morning care and day care don't even open until 7:00 and DH goes to work-usually- at 5:00am. Problem here.

    I guess if we go that route, he will need to be flexible and we may have to find additional child care options.

    Thanks!
  2. by   FutureNurseSaga
    Quote from lonestar88
    I currently have a 3.57.
    I also know of a girl who got a 2.4 who got in just because of this program agreement my school has with UMB.
    What school is that??? What agreement? I'd like to be in on this lol
  3. by   Bee76
    chlRN2b2010 please post the information you get about clinicals. I plan on attending in the fall, but I haven't received much information yet. I was pretty content with waiting, but seeing that 6:30 start time got me a little worried lol.

    I attended an info session in January, but they just kind of glazed over it, basically saying there were a variety of clinical sites and times. I didn't bother to ask more about it because I wasn't set on applying at that time.

    If 6:30 is the only option, I'll just have to make it work. But even 7 would be a little better for me daycare/school wise especially when my hub.'s job requires him to be out of town.
  4. by   lonestar88
    Quote from FutureNurseSaga
    What school is that??? What agreement? I'd like to be in on this lol
    You have to specify it when you apply as a freshman to UMBC. I know UMCP has a similar program because they're all sisters schools.
    According to my sister, the Women college of Notre Dame has the same program but with JHU.

    I was bitter but now that I'm accepted I don't care as much. lol.
  5. by   FutureNurseSaga
    Quote from lonestar88
    You have to specify it when you apply as a freshman to UMBC. I know UMCP has a similar program because they're all sisters schools.
    According to my sister, the Women college of Notre Dame has the same program but with JHU.

    I was bitter but now that I'm accepted I don't care as much. lol.
    Interesting... I spoke to someone who just got accepted to UMB ... she was a member of the UMBC-UMB agreement.... out of her class of 40 who were in the program and were suppose to transfer to UMB only 13 got accepted!!!! She had a 3.8

    I was thinking of going to UMBC or UMCP because of the agreement .... but it's not guaranteed that you will get accepted to UMB
  6. by   *ac*
    I graduated last December. Most clinicals in the second and third semester start at 0630. This is because nursing shifts shart at 0700. You need to be there before that to get your patient assignment(s) and be ready to sit in on report with the nurses at 0700.

    Things sometimes change (not that much), but when I was there Adult Health was one long clinical day (supposed to be 12 hours but rarely had to stay that late) per week with the exception of one site that had two evening shifts instead. Pediatrics and OB were one slightly shorter (eight hour) day (still starting at 0630), each going for half the semester. Psych was one eight hour day per week all semester, hours varying a little by site.

    In the last semester Community Health is one eight hour clinical day per week, hours vary alot from site to site. Also, in your last semester you do a 180 hour practicum, hours arranged by you and your assigned preceptor. This could include nights, weekends, whatever your preceptor is working. Most hospital shifts are 7a to 7:30p or 7p to 7:30a, but your preceptor may be flexible and let you work partial shifts if you want to.

    As far as sites, as someone else said, it's first come first served online registration. However, if you don't get what you want, you can try to switch with another student. Just make sure all your ducks are in a row before registration day or you will be locked out of registering (CPR up-to-date, immunizations up-to-date, etc.).

    Hope this helps.
  7. by   Bee76
    Thank you ac that was very helpful.

    Are there any clinical days during the first semester? Do they hold an orientation for new students? Is parking terrible?

    Sorry for all the questions, but I'm really excited to start and I guess a few new questions just popped into my head. I was patiently waiting for more info from the school, but it's helpful to know some things in advance.

    Any information you have is appreciated. Thanks
  8. by   *ac*
    Quote from Bee76
    Thank you ac that was very helpful.

    Are there any clinical days during the first semester? Do they hold an orientation for new students? Is parking terrible?

    Sorry for all the questions, but I'm really excited to start and I guess a few new questions just popped into my head. I was patiently waiting for more info from the school, but it's helpful to know some things in advance.

    Any information you have is appreciated. Thanks
    There are only two short clinical days the first semester, during Fundamenals - and they are later in the semester. The first semester, you spend a lot of time in the labs at school.
    If the uniform they sell at the bookstore doesn't fit you, don't buy it. You can get any white scrub top and iron on the school patch (from the book store) and any khaki colored scrub pants. You don't need it right away, anyway. (You do need a lab coat.)
    They offer parking for $5 a day in the student garage which is several blocks away. That's where most people park the first semester because you will be on campus a lot. For big bucks you can park in a closer garage. Sometimes you can park on the street but you have to feed the meter every 2 hours.
    Yes, they have orientation.
  9. by   shamus
    Is there any subjects we should study ahead of time to give us a good start? I have heard that pharmacology is the difficult one during the first semester.
  10. by   aHolisticStudent
    Quote from shamus
    Is there any subjects we should study ahead of time to give us a good start? I have heard that pharmacology is the difficult one during the first semester.
    Review your developmental psychology (particularly Erik Erikson and his stages), they'll be useful in Health Assessment. Know your A&P and Microbiology, particularly the immune response, the inflammatory response, blood pressure & hemodynamics of blood, really all of the homeostatic mechnisms in the human body with a particular focus on the roles of the liver, kidneys (if you're looking to ease your transition into pathopharmacology), and the RAAS. Review and know all the cranial nerves, where they are and what they do. This will save you time when learning how to assess the different CNs in Health Assessment. Fundamentals is all about learning to think differently so I would recommend picking up a book on how NCLEX questions are created and how to break them down. Not necessary, but most people who did really well on the tests (read: high A's) had a better understanding of how to approach the questions than did everyone else.

    Other than that, just relax and enjoy your time off. School will start before you know it and you don't want to be burnt out before the semester even begins.
  11. by   clhRN2b2010
    I will ask next week if they have a book list that we can access. I got a book from AACC's required list that was helpful in test taking strategies and looking at NCLEX type questions.
    Its called

    Test Success: Test taking techniques for the beginning nursing students. By Patricia Nugent and Barbara Vitale.

    It's designed essentially to prepare for the type of testing that you will see in NS. It's hard to gauge how spot on it is since I haven't been to NS yet
  12. by   aHolisticStudent
    Quote from clhRN2b2010
    I will ask next week if they have a book list that we can access. I got a book from AACC's required list that was helpful in test taking strategies and looking at NCLEX type questions.
    Its called

    Test Success: Test taking techniques for the beginning nursing students. By Patricia Nugent and Barbara Vitale.

    It's designed essentially to prepare for the type of testing that you will see in NS. It's hard to gauge how spot on it is since I haven't been to NS yet
    It's a good book. However, two things should be considered first when looking at questions and answers.

    1) Your ABCs (Airway, Breathing, Bleeding, Circulation) always takes precedence when deciding which answer should come first.

    2) Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

    If neither of those two options help with the answers provided then I'd move on to the Nursing Process, all encompassing words, restatement of words in the question and answer, False/False, etc. as outlined in the Nugent text.

    Good luck in the Fall.
  13. by   *ac*
    Quote from shamus
    Is there any subjects we should study ahead of time to give us a good start? I have heard that pharmacology is the difficult one during the first semester.
    Yep, patho-pharm is the killer. Five hours of lecture on Fridays.

    Beyond having taken your prereqs I don't know what you could do to prep.

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