Anybody Else Doing Howard CC's Accelerated RN Program Starting May 2009?

  1. 0
    Hello everybody!

    I just received my acceptance letter for the Howard Community College accelerated RN program starting in May, 2009 (and running until July, 2010).

    I wanted to see if there was anybody else on the local forum that has applied and/or been accepted to the program yet... I'd love to meet some fellow students before this (intense) program actually starts.

    Best wishes!
  2. 29 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    I was thinking about it, but I'm not finished all of my pre-reqs yet so I couldn't apply for 2009. I may apply for 2010 though.
  4. 0
    It's a fantastic program in that it's one of the only ones around that allows you to complete your entire RN in just 14 months and you don't even need a bachelor's degree to get in. Also, graduates of the program have remarkably high NCLEX pass rates -- I believe that, in several of the last 5 years, the accelerated program graduates have had 100% pass rates.

    The program does, however, require all prereqs to be completed up front and it's got more prereqs that most other RN programs (Chemistry, etc., which aren't required for the AACC program)

    Definitely worth looking into if you want to pursue the ADN route!
  5. 0
    how competitive is the program? I may apply for fall 2010, but the program just sounds so intense!
  6. 0
    I mean, its an accelerated program so I'm sure its more intense than the regular program. I feel like it would very much be like a summer session of a class. I like this better because I get bored with regular semester long classes and loved the condensed classes in the summer were we're really engaged full blast and don't have a chance to get bored (which for me means complacent and lazy).

    I will probably apply for Fall of 2010 as well. I think the minimum gpa needed is liek 3.3 or so...something very high and you must have all of your pre-reqs finished at the time of application (i believe).
  7. 2
    congratulations! you are correct about it being "intense". it's definitely not for quitters. there's an exam every 3-4 weeks. be prepared to spend saturdays/sundays/evenings in the skills lab. no social life for 14 months! the teaching staff is very supportive and are always available to the students. you are lucky that they extended the program to 14 months. we had to do it in 11 months . yes you are required to have all your prerequisites done (gpa at least 3.0; 3.25 in sciences) prior to even turning in your application.

    good luck!!!
    and yes, we did have a 100% pass rate.
    Last edit by koala_bear on Nov 6, '08
    TennyLPN2B and PharmaRN like this.
  8. 0
    It's very competitive. Don't settle for just meeting the GPA requirements. Some applicants go in with 4.0s. Being an In-county student earns you points in the application process too.
  9. 0
    Good to hear from someone who's completed the program. Yep, you're absolutely right -- preference is definitely given to in-county students, but they also have a rolling admission option: if you get 15 'points' and finish all prereqs before the application deadline, you're in. Points are accumulated by:

    -Having any bachelor's degree (5 points)
    -Science GPA: 4.0 (20 points), 3.75-3.99 (10 points), 3.5-3.74 (5 points), 3.25-3.49 (2 points)
    -Overall GPA: 4.0 4.0 (20 points), 3.75-3.99 (10 points), 3.5-3.74 (5 points), 3.25-3.49 (2 points)

    So you've got to carry a minimum science GPA of 3.75 and a minimum overall GPA of 3.5 (or vice versa) unless you've already got a bachelor's degree in another field. For most people, this essentially means one 'B' in one science class and one 'B' in another prerequisite. Since I'm not a HoCo resident, I was able to get in (with a tremendous amount of effort) by holding a 4.0 throughout all of my prereqs.

    To Koala_Bear: I appreciate your comments and I'm glad to hear that the teaching staff was supportive... I was also surprised that they extended it to 14 months. It was just within the last year or two that they did that-- I suppose any longer than that and it almost wouldn't be worth it, but I guess 14 months is still the best deal in town for those that can get in.
  10. 0
    when we were almost through with the program, there was talk of them extending it to 13 months i think mainly because lack of time in l&d. how many seats are they offering now? they only took 24 when i did the program.

    you won't feel the 14 months go by. :d it's more a matter of 3-4 weeks of lecture/clinical, then test, then another 3-4 weeks, then a test, then u move on to the next course.....on and on and on until next thing you know, you're on your last course and we're talking pinning/capping ceremony!!

    i personally believe that it's a great program. you get to develop close relationships with your batchmates whether you go to the same clinical sites or not, but then again who wouldn't if you all see each other 5 days a week at least!?!?

    congratulations again!!!

    Quote from psychopharmacology
    good to hear from someone who's completed the program. yep, you're absolutely right -- preference is definitely given to in-county students, but they also have a rolling admission option: if you get 15 'points' and finish all prereqs before the application deadline, you're in. points are accumulated by:

    -having any bachelor's degree (5 points)
    -science gpa: 4.0 (20 points), 3.75-3.99 (10 points), 3.5-3.74 (5 points), 3.25-3.49 (2 points)
    -overall gpa: 4.0 4.0 (20 points), 3.75-3.99 (10 points), 3.5-3.74 (5 points), 3.25-3.49 (2 points)

    so you've got to carry a minimum science gpa of 3.75 and a minimum overall gpa of 3.5 (or vice versa) unless you've already got a bachelor's degree in another field. for most people, this essentially means one 'b' in one science class and one 'b' in another prerequisite. since i'm not a hoco resident, i was able to get in (with a tremendous amount of effort) by holding a 4.0 throughout all of my prereqs.

    to koala_bear: i appreciate your comments and i'm glad to hear that the teaching staff was supportive... i was also surprised that they extended it to 14 months. it was just within the last year or two that they did that-- i suppose any longer than that and it almost wouldn't be worth it, but i guess 14 months is still the best deal in town for those that can get in.
  11. 1
    I JUST received my acceptance letter!!! I think that the intense months are the non-normal semester times (May-August and December-January, then May-July following year). From what I understand, the 2 "normal" semesters (September-mid December and mid January-May) are done at a standard pace. I think I can handle it if it's done in this manner.

    I am STILL trying to get the BSN route of my head. I keep wondering if an ADN now will hold me back later. But I think the accelerated ADN is such a bargain and time-saver in the end. And I can go back for my BSN while I'm already an RN, with a hospital possibly footing the bill.

    Keep in touch - those of you in the accelerated program!
    m.neugz likes this.


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