The Guys Club: Guy Students Come on In! - page 47

Hi All! I'm a crazy father of 2 ex-premed who just recently turned down Northwestern to go into a RN program. I already have an Associate in Science, but I'll be getting another ADN and then... Read More

  1. by   Kabin
    Quote from nyforlove
    I start volunteering next week at a NYC hospital 4 hours/week--this is all happening so quickly!
    Good for you, nyforlove. I have a friend that's a lawyer with over 10 years of experience and he also has decided to get into nursing.
  2. by   WildShot
    Heya Guys,
    I am currently a first semester ADN student in Pittsburgh pa, I used to be a silversmith but lost my job and always wanted to help people out so i thought I would try out nursing. I love it so far (man, does my brain hurt) i work as a computer tech (work study) and as a bartender ( I am a college student and I think thats a prereq hehe) for a privite club. I have noticed that you were talking about the male/female ratio earlier. we have approx 9 guys in a 209 size class. I dont know all of the women but i do know most of the guys. I am hoping to work in the ED when I graduate. Thats the kind of work i like to do. I did work there in the summer as a ED tech and just loved the pace(it was over xmas break with the flu & pneumonia). just thought I would drop bye for a lil Hi and all

    Wild
  3. by   rickybear
    Hi guys, a gay male, ADN student here...I'm working in Home health now going to start the program, in jan. I ment to do this the last 20 years and just haven't gotten around to it. I was a medic in the Army, 15 years ago. Finally have a supportive partner that will me make a change. I'm 43 years old...definately a second career.
  4. by   dave1117
    Not for nothing and not to start an arguement...

    But who the heck cares that your gay...?

    Of all the posts in this thread, you're the first to claim your sexuality...

    Welcome to allnurses.com, good luck in school but by all means let's keep our unecessary personal preferences out of here, who really cares.
  5. by   rickybear
    Quote from dave1117
    Not for nothing and not to start an arguement...But who the heck cares that your gay...?Welcome to allnurses.com, good luck in school but by all means let's keep our unecessary personal preferences out of here, who really cares.
    I think it's comical that when people say...things like this, they immediately do exactly what say they don't mean to do. Apparently you care enough to point it out and get on a high horse telling me it's not something I should mention....so you tell me. Heterosexual is the default assumption, if you are straight you don't have to mention it. But several men here have mentioned their wives and kids. ( personally glad to hear it ) If I had instead just mentioned my husband would that have been better? ( guess some might have even thought I was a woman...( no insult to the fairer sex ) Perhaps instead of trying to make everyone conform to your sensibilities, It would serve you better to keeping your own side of the street clean. But that's my advice, take what you want and leave the rest.



    Just a suggestion...



    Ricky



  6. by   malenurse1
    Quote from rickybear

    I think it's comical that when people say...things like this, they immediately do exactly what say they don't mean to do. Apparently you care enough to point it out and get on a high horse telling me it's not something I should mention....so you tell me. Heterosexual is the default assumption, if you are straight you don't have to mention it. But several men here have mentioned their wives and kids. ( personally glad to hear it ) If I had instead just mentioned my husband would that have been better? ( guess some might have even thought I was a woman...( no insult to the fairer sex ) Perhaps instead of trying to make everyone conform to your sensibilities, It would serve you better to keeping your own side of the street clean. But that's my advice, take what you want and leave the rest.



    Just a suggestion...



    Ricky



    Welcome Ricky. This is the Guys club. Most of us don't care gay, straight, or somewhere inbetween. I think its great that you are proud enough to announce who you are, just like the straight guys are proud enough to announce their families. I am sure that Dave didn't mean anything offensive by what he said. Good luck with school, as an old Air Force medic it sounds like you have a good background.
    Last edit by malenurse1 on Oct 20, '04
  7. by   NurseMac
    Quote from nyforlove
    Hi Guys,
    I love this website--just discovered it several days ago--it's been so helpful--here's the skinny on me--a 38 year-old male lawyer/accountant in NYC who has decided to get an accelerated BSN--my mom's an RN, sister-in-law a nurse anesthesist (sorry for spelling), and several friends are RNs...will take some excelsior exams this fall and apply for summer '05 admission in NYC--would love to meet up with other students in the NYC area to shoot the breeze, compare notes as we progress...I know admission is competitive for the accelerated programs, so I'll apply for several--Downstate, Stonybrook, Pace...Thanks again for this great site.
    My suggestion - if you have a semester before you begin - take pharmacology and pathophysiology and get them out of the way while you have time. If you take these in advance then when your BSN program begins, you will be able to focus on your clinical, your labs, your health assessment, your nursing skills, and on mental health or whatever your main nursing theory class is. Actually at my school, they will not let you into the accelerated BSN program unless you have already done these.

    Patho is a tough class with text books that are dense (our school uses the McCance & Huether "Pathophysiology" text) and concept mapping that is a pain in the gluteus maximus. If you can't find a class for these locally then you can take patho and pharm online from places such as http://www.canyoncollege.edu/, https://courses.pnhs.purdue.edu/, or http://www.learn.maine.edu/.

    If you don't want to do a class in advance online then let me point out the "Made Incredibly Easy" books. You can make your patho class much less painlful to ease into if you buy and read "Fluids and Electrolytes Made Incredibly Easy" and "Pathophysiology Made Incredibly Easy" - although read the F&E first.

    You can make the pharmacology / nursing connection more readily if you buy and read "Nursing Pharmacology Made Incredibly Easy." (Nb. Do not buy the "Clinical Pharmacology Made Incredibly Easy" - this is a subset of the Nursing Pharm Made Incredibly Easy and it lacks all the nursing diagnoses. It is the nursing diagnoses in this book that make it gold when it comes to doing assignments in Pharm).

    Also, there is an idiotic Nursing Entrance Exam they are making people take now. This test is truly annoying. You have to do 10 questions on long division, 10 on multiplication, 10 on fractions, 10 on decimal points, 10 on percentages, ten on simple algebra and I think ratios might have been there too. Apart from that it is just psych questions and a speed reading test. A good book for reviewing what will be in this test is "Calculate with Confidence" by Deborah Morris - the first five or six chapters. This is a text written for the dosage calculation class that you'll have to take during your first or second semester. It is not a test review book - but the first six chapters will give you all you need to know for the test I think (except for the algebra). Unless the test has changed!

    Good luck. The accelerated programs are demanding. Very doable if you have your life organized.

    NurseMac
  8. by   NurseMac
    Quote from nyforlove
    Hi Guys,
    I love this website--just discovered it several days ago--it's been so helpful--here's the skinny on me--a 38 year-old male lawyer/accountant in NYC who has decided to get an accelerated BSN--my mom's an RN, sister-in-law a nurse anesthesist (sorry for spelling), and several friends are RNs...will take some excelsior exams this fall and apply for summer '05 admission in NYC--would love to meet up with other students in the NYC area to shoot the breeze, compare notes as we progress...I know admission is competitive for the accelerated programs, so I'll apply for several--Downstate, Stonybrook, Pace...Thanks again for this great site.
    Forgot to mention in my previous message - if you are considering the accelerated BSN program and you already have a degree then why not consider the ELMSN program? (Entry Level MSN). Takes almost the same length of time. You fellow students in a MSN program will be older than BSN students typcially are. This might be an advantage to you (considering your age) when you get to group work, etc.

    NurseMac
  9. by   piper_for_hire
    Word of caution on the Accelerated MSN - not all MSN degrees are offered in accelerated format and some MSN degrees are not available if you already have an MSN. (strange, but true, though I think it's silly)

    Also - some say that having an MSN without any nursing experience is a bad thing, but I have no idea if that's really true.
  10. by   Kabin
    Quote from piper_for_hire
    Word of caution on the Accelerated MSN - not all MSN degrees are offered in accelerated format and some MSN degrees are not available if you already have an MSN. (strange, but true, though I think it's silly)

    Also - some say that having an MSN without any nursing experience is a bad thing, but I have no idea if that's really true.
    I had heard from a Californian interested in such a program, that those accelerated early MSN programs can suffer with a lack of places that offer clinicals. Supposedly, some hospitals just don't like the idea of someone with zero nursing experience suddenly being an MSN.
  11. by   NurseMac
    Quote from Kabin
    I had heard from a Californian interested in such a program, that those accelerated early MSN programs can suffer with a lack of places that offer clinicals. Supposedly, some hospitals just don't like the idea of someone with zero nursing experience suddenly being an MSN.
    At my school (in Northern California) in my Entry Level MSN program we have clinicals from week two of the first semester onwards. In the first semester it is one full day per week clinical, second semester is two days, and by the end of the program you're at four full days per week of clinicals.

    After four semesters you sit your NCLEX and State Boards. Then most people work for a year, then come back for 3 more semesters (case management track) or 7 more semesters (family nurse practitioner track). Grads from our program are usually hired before end of their graduating semester. Thus, we do not exactly have "zero nursing experience" by the time we get our MSNs. We will have had four semesters of clinicals to RN then at least a year of full time work as an RN then a minimum of a year and a half of full time work while we finish our classes in Case Mangement, or a few years longer for those doing FNP. It is simply not possible to get an MSN from my school with less than two and a half years of work as an RN. This means that we are not really possessing "zero nursing experience."

    As for difficulty getting clinicals - if you mean during the program - then yes - it is hard for local nursing schools to find clinical placements for all students these days because all the nursing schools have increased the number of nurses they are training. There are more nurses being trained than there are easily available places in our area. However, our school manages to place everyone. I have had only positive feedback from my clinicals.

    When it comes to being a nurse - I will have my RN for two and a half years before I have an MSN - so I think by then it will be ok to have the MSN. I would not want to be as inexperienced as I feel now and have the letters "MSN" after my name. That would be just idiotic.

    Hope this helps! :hatparty:
  12. by   DannyD
    I'm currently taking Physical examination & Health Assessment class. I really have a hard time with the exam format (case scenerio with 4 possible answers). The choices are really close in meanings. The professor keeps saying that "we have to apply everything I've taught to find the right answer". The average grade for the class of the first exam is a C. The professor seemed to get irritated when we asked her why she chose answer "A" or answer "B". Her rationale was vague and confused the hell out of us. Anyhow, anyone of you have any tips or tricks to help me out? Thanks
  13. by   Kabin
    I wouldn't mind an accelerated MSN program so long as the program had enough course work in a real master degree area of study and not just RN education and clinicals.

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