Switching careers to nursing. who has done it? - page 2

I am thinking of going back to school to become an RN. My wife is an RN and like most nurses she does work hard, has her bad days, but also has some very rewarding days to go along with a decent... Read More

  1. by   luvltc
    If nursing is something that you are thinking about doing, go for it. It is so rewarding. Best wishes in whatever you decide to do.
  2. by   thatoneguy
    i decided to switch when i was 30ish. i am taking the board test on monday. 10/03 for me i get tired easy too, maybe in 1-2 years. but with nursing i plan on becomeing a medi-vac/flight nurse. i need to have at least 5 years of icu/trauma experence before i can even apply. so i plan on doing 2 years CCU then 2 years CTU then 1-2years trauma, before i get into the medivac. after that work in either ICU/CCU/ER and as a flight nurse. if i get board after 10+years i might become a instuctor at one of the local nursing schools. i think the best part of nursing is all the different day to day jobs you can do. if your like me i hate staying in the same place year after year, you can always work for a registry and move around to different places every so often. the one thing i hate about nursing is all the politics. to get state and federal funding hospitals do things that seem to be a waste of time and energy to us but need to implement various programs to recieve there funding. seems everyone wants to talk about why you can not do this or that instead of talking about how we can get this or that done. just about every nurse i talk to was/is in the top of their class and got straight A's(makes me question their integrity). just remember no matter what people tell you nursing is still a business and the people making the decisions first thought is how much money not what is best for the patient. this can be fustrating. all and all its not a bad choice for a career. just get ready, because all your friends and there freinds and so on will be asking your opinion everytime they scratch themselves. good luck with whatever you decide to do.
    Last edit by thatoneguy on Sep 30, '05
  3. by   2bnurseguy_2005
    I am wanting to get into a nursing program. I have a BBA in Management and would you guys suggest an ADN or BSN program for someone with a low gpa in undergrad. I have not begun science pre reqs yet the only one I've taken is Biology I &II. Also, are most of the nursing jobs 3rd shift?
  4. by   thatoneguy
    i would go to the JC to get finish my prereq. classes and transfer to a bs program. just make sure you talk to whatever school and see what they will take for transfer from whatever JC you goto.
  5. by   piper_for_hire
    The hospitals around here are all 12 hr shifts, so there's no 3rd shift. They're always hiring for days and nights.

    -S

    Quote from nurseguy_2005
    I am wanting to get into a nursing program. I have a BBA in Management and would you guys suggest an ADN or BSN program for someone with a low gpa in undergrad. I have not begun science pre reqs yet the only one I've taken is Biology I &II. Also, are most of the nursing jobs 3rd shift?
  6. by   MsBruiser
    Currently working as a senior manager for a large management consulting company. I'm an MBA type - IT related. I am in the final semester of pre-reqs - doing my CNA certification which is a requirement where I live for ADN programs. It is a weird switch - during the week, corporate, weekend, helping people empty their ostomy bags. But if the CNA training is even a hint of what it is like to be a nurse, I know I found my calling. It is awesome! I found out that I can handle all three of our basic body fluids - urine, poop, blood - and derive more satisfaction changing bed linens than I ever felt helping a client install the latest and greatest software. In fact, an elderly female patient said to me this very weekend "why would you want a job where you have to change beds" and I just looked at her, smiled and said "Ma'am I've been waiting 20 years to be able to change beds for a living..."
  7. by   gjbob
    Go for It !!
    I'm also attending college pecking away at the prerequisites.
    It's nice to hear others are doing as I am ...
    At first my wife thought I was crazy, but since has realized that the medical
    field has always been my calling.
    I too spent many years in the IT field .... It gets old ..
    Best of Luck !!
  8. by   royr
    I am a junior in a 4 year nursing program. I decided to try to become a nurse because life has finaly convinced me of what really matters. I put a 20+ year career as a CEO aside, along with my MBA and went back to shool for an education in how to help people, rather than how to make $$ from them. So far, it has been both difficult and rewarding. Learning to express emotions and learn from the process has been the most difficult part. My upbringing was a combination of keep a stiff upper lip, and children should be seen and not heard - yes I am of that generation. Now I find myself wanting to do pediatrics, as interacting with these youngsters and helping make their "ouchies" and "owies" better is showing me that I missed my entire childhood having always been expected to be an adult since I was 8 years old. I am an old dog, but I seem to be learning usefull new tricks everyday in nursing school. So far, so good. The only thing I really miss is being in charge, but I am getting over it slowly. It is also quite difficult not being able to really fit in, as I stand out of the crowd of 19 and 20 year olds. Being visible does have advantages though, as it is always easy to ask for extra help with things that are not comming easy with the work (first time I ever had to make a bed for someone else). I think you will find a career change rewarding if your heart is in it. If you do things for $$, then there will always be an easier way to make that buck and life will become a grind. Just my experience.
  9. by   Thunderwolf
    Quote from royr
    I am a junior in a 4 year nursing program. I decided to try to become a nurse because life has finaly convinced me of what really matters. I put a 20+ year career as a CEO aside, along with my MBA and went back to shool for an education in how to help people, rather than how to make $$ from them. So far, it has been both difficult and rewarding. Learning to express emotions and learn from the process has been the most difficult part. My upbringing was a combination of keep a stiff upper lip, and children should be seen and not heard - yes I am of that generation. Now I find myself wanting to do pediatrics, as interacting with these youngsters and helping make their "ouchies" and "owies" better is showing me that I missed my entire childhood having always been expected to be an adult since I was 8 years old. I am an old dog, but I seem to be learning usefull new tricks everyday in nursing school. So far, so good. The only thing I really miss is being in charge, but I am getting over it slowly. It is also quite difficult not being able to really fit in, as I stand out of the crowd of 19 and 20 year olds. Being visible does have advantages though, as it is always easy to ask for extra help with things that are not comming easy with the work (first time I ever had to make a bed for someone else). I think you will find a career change rewarding if your heart is in it. If you do things for $$, then there will always be an easier way to make that buck and life will become a grind. Just my experience.

    Royr, you are a man after my own heart....glad to have you in the fold. It is a great thing to have a new student/nurse come on board who already has had plenty of life experience and has learned for oneself that $$$ and power isn't all what it is cracked up to be. It is what we can give unto others via our talents, our experience, and of ourselves that matter the most. Excellent that you are choosing Peds. Young kids, especially nowadays, often need to see and experience for themselves that men can be giving, nurturing, and just plain good men...a corrective experience which may be lacking in their own environments. My hat's off to you, my friend. We need more men like you. Good luck in the remainder of your program.

    Wolfie
  10. by   dlhall
    I was in the US Navy for years, and then I got out and joined teh US Coast Guard,a nd now I'm a militray corpman,and I'm currently in college working on my pre-req,s for nursing.
  11. by   Thunderwolf
    Glad to see more men coming into the fold....from all walks of life and experience. We have plenty of room....and plenty to give...our knowledge, our personal experience, and our expertise.
  12. by   dlhall
    What is the perctanage of black male nurses in the field? Here in texas I hardly see any black male nurses? Does any know if there is a strong recruitment to recruit minorities for nursing school?
  13. by   Corvette Guy
    My first career was an aircraft electrician [USMC & Civilian], then started college [at age 32] with goal of becoming a nurse. First, chose Surgical Technology [Scrub Tech] career field d/t the ADN waiting list was too long. Yet, while taking Surg Tech prereq courses also took ADN & BSN prereqs. One year after completing ST program I received a call from ADN program wanting know if I was still interested. So, I worked fulltime [64hrs/pay period] as a CST while going to ADN program. Four years later enrolled into online RN-BSN program, and two years later able to claim title as a BSN. BTW, I was a single-parent w/2 sons while in ST & ADN programs.

    I've always been on the side of the under dog, thus enjoy helping out others. Plus, I find the human body fascinating. I wish I'd gotten into the health care field a long time ago. Yet, IMHO male nurses are more readily accepted in recent times.
    • Nursing Experience; Telemetry Floor, Intensive Care Unit [Civilian & USAR Nurse Corps], OR RN [Circulate/ Scrub]
    • Health Care Degrees; AAS in Surgical Technology 1995, AAS in Nursing [ADN] 1998, Bachelor of Science in Nursing 2004

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