Show me the Money - pg.5 | allnurses

Show me the Money - page 7

Folks, I need some advice. A little back ground. I am a forty-two year old, husband and father of two that has been employed as a sales engineer for the past 20 years. Several life experiences,... Read More

  1. Visit  Browndog profile page
    0
    [QUOTE=vortex72]If your concern is mainly income, then dont be concerned.

    PS: I'm a guy and just to let you know nursing has a lot of shortfalls just like any other career. The grass may look greener on the other side but thats just cuz there is ******** being used as fertilizer! What I'm trying to say is think hard before you change because everything has its ups and downs. QUOTE]


    vortex72-

    Thanks for the post and great information.

    Vortex72, please understand that, while I am concerned about the financial implications of a 180 degree career change in mid-life, my primary concern is finding a way to pursue this path for deeper reasons. I certainly do not view nursing as a "greener pasture" in the commonly refered to way (in fact it is probably a browner pasture in my case with regard to financial, work-hours, emotional stress, political, exposure to hazards, paperwork and other concerns)....but I do hope that it will prove to be a greener pasture for me with regard to service,purpose and calling. I also hope to find it to be intellectually challenging.

    Maybe I do need a reality check here. I noted that you are in Tennessee. Would it be possible for me get your input regarding nursing and specifically APN nursing in this market? How are males accepted? What about "older" folks like me? What are the worst parts of the job? The best? Should I reconsider the PA path?

    Any other information that you think I could use before I jump off the deep end would be appreciated. I am enrolled in an accelerated program this fall and time is running out.

    Thanks again,

    browndog
  2. Visit  vortex72 profile page
    0
    [QUOTE=Browndog]
    Quote from vortex72
    If your concern is mainly income, then dont be concerned.

    PS: I'm a guy and just to let you know nursing has a lot of shortfalls just like any other career. The grass may look greener on the other side but thats just cuz there is ******** being used as fertilizer! What I'm trying to say is think hard before you change because everything has its ups and downs. QUOTE]


    vortex72-

    Thanks for the post and great information.

    Vortex72, please understand that, while I am concerned about the financial implications of a 180 degree career change in mid-life, my primary concern is finding a way to pursue this path for deeper reasons. I certainly do not view nursing as a "greener pasture" in the commonly refered to way (in fact it is probably a browner pasture in my case with regard to financial, work-hours, emotional stress, political, exposure to hazards, paperwork and other concerns)....but I do hope that it will prove to be a greener pasture for me with regard to service,purpose and calling. I also hope to find it to be intellectually challenging.

    Maybe I do need a reality check here. I noted that you are in Tennessee. Would it be possible for me get your input regarding nursing and specifically APN nursing in this market? How are males accepted? What about "older" folks like me? What are the worst parts of the job? The best? Should I reconsider the PA path?

    Any other information that you think I could use before I jump off the deep end would be appreciated. I am enrolled in an accelerated program this fall and time is running out.

    Thanks again,

    browndog
    Males are accepted fine and age is not an issue. In fact, most places I've worked love having male nurses since we tend to bring balance to a predominantly female area (testosterone diluting the estrogen). Ironically, in some of the areas that males gravitate to like ICU and ER you might find yourself working some shifts with all male nurses!

    If your ultimate goal is to provide care as a midlevel provider(ACNP or PA) then you might still consider PA school since you could possibly go straight into a PA program after getting a few prerequisites(considering you already have a degree in something else)
    PA's and NP's are basically interchangeable jobs in the medical community. The advantage to nursing is you can always get your RN and try out a variety of medical settings, then you'll be more attuned to what speciality you'd like to pursue as a practitioner. There is family nurse practitioner, pediatric, psychiatric, acute, etc. Also, in many states NP's have more autonomy than PA's(some states you can open your OWN practice and practice independently provided you stay in your realm of practice according to that state's nurse practice act) Anyway, there are many things to consider. Hope my info helped some.
  3. Visit  craig06 profile page
    0
    I feel that the BSN route is the best course for nursing. If one chooses to be a floor nurse then there is really no reason to have a BSN. The two-year RNs seem to have parity with four-year RNs in regard to payscale. I am from Ohio and my area starts at 23-25 per hour (46K to 50K) plus shift differential and overtime. I have a friend that is a certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) and he started at 125K plus a signing bonus and moving expenses. Nursing can be lucrative if you work the overtime and work more than the seemingly standard 36 hour week (I still can't imagine only working 36 hours a week). I would be going from 70+ hour weeks to XXX hours. Still blows my mind but I digress.

    Most hospitals are non-profits and provide a 403(b) program for the employees with some offering matching up to x percent. Full medical packages are the norm (med, vision, and dental plus some offer STD and LTD) with a nominal co-pay. The two larger hospitals in my area offer daycare, sick leave, etc as well.

    If you are interested in advanced care then a BSN is a must unless your area offers a bridge program from a two-year program to a MSN. The CRNA program I am interested in requires a 3.0+ and takes 27 months to complete. After speaking to several people who are APNs the consensus seems to be that one should have five years experience before entering into the APN programs.

    Hope this bit of information helps.

    Craig
  4. Visit  TexasCCRN profile page
    0
    Sounds like your wife is supportive enough. It just means that with a pay cut that you can still live within your means and not get into a bunch of debt. Going from 90K to 60 or so is a big cut. Changes may have to be made. Good Luck it can be done.
  5. Visit  tacticalnp profile page
    0
    Quote from Browndog
    Folks, I need some advice.

    A little back ground. I am a forty-two year old, husband and father of two that has been employed as a sales engineer for the past 20 years. Several life experiences, including an exposure to flight nursing via my service as a first responder and volunteer firefighter, have led me to the conviction that my calling is to serve others as a nurse. I am close to completing my pre-requisites for nursing school and have been accepted to a local accelerated BSN program (16 months) which begins this fall.

    I am posting on this forum because I need input from all of the other (please tell me there are other) "older" dads out there who are pursuing a mid-life change into nursing while having to support a family. Specifically:

    * How are you financing your career change?
    * How much is this costing you (tuition and living expenses while in school)?
    * How much of a pay cut are you taking to pursue this calling?
    * Have I lost my ever-loving mind?

    I am sincerely looking for input as I am currently riding the roller coaster of excitement for finally finding my calling and the feelings of quilt/fear for what this may mean financially to the family that I love. Some input to consider as I seek your advice:

    1) The BSN program that I am pursuing will cost over $30K and I expect to spend another $45K in basic living expenses for the family. (There are no local public school programs that offer an accelerated format and time is money with a family of four.)
    2) My current income is approximately $90K.
    3) Upon completion of my BSN, my goal is to immediately enroll in an ACNP program while working at night at a local Level 1 Trauma Center. I would ultimately like to work as a Nurse Practitioner in an ER with a PRN position with a flight program.
    4) My wife supports me on this 100%. She is great.

    Am I crazy for giving up so much financially to pursue this goal. Will this financial sacrifice be forever or can I expect to get reasonably close eventually. Has anyone else done this? Should I "punt" and resign myself to an empty (but profitable) career?

    Sorry for the long post. I really need to get all of this out. Thanks for the sounding board.

    Browndog

    Well i would like to say i am make over 100K as a Family Nurse Practitioner in the Emergency Room and Urgent where i have been working for four years, but Im not.... the salary is more like 60-65k.....and for as much time as you put in for education, CE, meetings for administrative information etc....it almost seems like it not worth it.

    Dont get me wrong I love treating the patients and get great gratification from education, treating and healing each person weither its talking or medication management. The money is just not all that.

    The only way I think we as nurse practitioner can boost our pay is not to accept low pay scale when we are essentially functioning as physicians with out that extra 100k....best of luck to you in your educational experience.

    John Bailey
    FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER
    ASSIST DIRECTOR of EMERGENCY SERVICES
  6. Visit  MsBruiser profile page
    0
    I'm on my last two pre-reqs. Hope to start school by August 2006 at the latest. To answer these questions:

    * How are you financing your career change?

    I work as a management consultant and I have saved lots of money during the past 2 years while doing my pre-reqs. I am also doing an ADN notwithstanding my BA/MBA degrees. ADN is cheaper and I can always take a bridge program for BSN if I choose. Who needs $30k in debt?

    * How much is this costing you (tuition and living expenses while in school)?

    Community college is around $6k in total. My wife works and we have money saved for day care expenses - plus some money to pay ourselves a stipend each month to supplement her salary.

    * How much of a pay cut are you taking to pursue this calling?

    Plenty!

    * Have I lost my ever-loving mind?

    If following your heart and pursuing your goal is losing your mind - yes!

    We can accomodate my career change because we live VERY MODESTLY for our income level. We have no debt, a small mortgage, and paid-off cars. While my co-workers drive BMW(s) I drive a 10 year-old Saturn and a Ford Escape. I still lose sleep thinking about money issues, but we prepared for the inevitable.
    Last edit by MsBruiser on Jul 25, '06
  7. Visit  Balder_LPN profile page
    0
    Quote from tamar2007
    since nursing shortages hit the headlines, it's drawing in people from a lot of different backgrounds and professions. although a lawyer i have not met yet, i guess their personality is so different they would never be attracted to nursing (unless their choice of law was a mistake to begin with :melody: ...)
    former it worker here, and god, i hope i never see a former lawyer as a nurse.
  8. Visit  NurseDaddy2006 profile page
    0
    It can be done.
    I'm new here. But I've been a student on his way to an ASN since 2003.
    I'm 40, got let go from my IT consulting position making 73K and wound up becoming a stay-at-home-dad to my then 4 month old boy. Since I had no degree in anything, I opted to go back to school. My son is now 3 and a half, and I'm in my second year of the nursing program at a local community college. I graduate in May, and cant wait.

    Meanwhile, I spend our savings to bridge the gap between what it costs to live and why my wife earns. Once I'm working, I'll pay myself back. I hope.

    Good luck.

    ND
  9. Visit  tobykool profile page
    0
    which state do you intend to work in? it seems that you'll be getting a good deal of money. You deserve whatever you earn- nursing school is hard, i graduate in may 2006. Good luck!!!


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