Please Nursing, Stop Trying So Hard! - page 2

by steven007 12,557 Views | 45 Comments

As I come to being 3 months away from graduating my BScN, I have reflected on the evolution of my perspective of nursing over these 4 years. Initially, it started off quite negatively. I even posted a quite hateful article about... Read More


  1. 10
    steven007,

    I LOL'd at the story of talking about bullying and what happened in AZ and your professor freaking out and getting the higher ups involved!!! That was very smart and brave to counter her discrimination and bias. Sweet justice that she is now out on "medical leave."

    I agree with so much of what you wrote about nurses and how they view themselves. I came to nursing being 35+, having a Bachelor's in another field and years of real-world experience under my belt. I was amazed at the odd, myopic and very skewed way nurses viewed themselves as well as how they perceive that others view them. I've never heard the word "professional" or "profession" more in my entire life since entering this field. Are they trying to convince themselves??? BTW, in my previous field a Bachelor's was the entry level period and a national standardized exam that everyone must pass. I can't even think of a time in school or in the workplace when we harped about being "professionals in a profession." I have found that it is the nurses who have never worked in another field and became nurses very young that are obsessed with this. Those of us who have other work experiences or came into the field later in life appear to have a more healthy view nursing. My personal favorite are the RN's whose signature looks like this:
    Mary Smith RN, BSN, MSN, CCRN DNP, FAAN (and I could go on!!) Good Lord, get over yourself woman!! Those ones tend to be the real harpies when it comes to talking about nurses being professionals.
    gonzo1, englishgeek, steven007, and 7 others like this.
  2. 4
    I have to agree with you, my nursing school experience was not that great. It seems there is an unwritten rule where the instructors eat their young. I had very few teachers to who I would call fair. Many felt the need to belittle and put down students. I do not see how degrading anyone makes him or her a better nurse. They also face discrimination in the class from teachers
    The problem I saw was most of the students were older adultswho were starting a new career. Some had medical back grounds other math, English teacher and business. It is dead wrong to treat an adult as a child. It wrong to treat and paramedic with 10 yearsíexperience like he is an idiot or tell a CNA that does not know how to clean a patientís bottom. We all bought something to the table we could all learn from. I remember one time weall got lectured about how poor some of the grammar and spelling was on our first nursing paper, this was followed by our weekly 50 qestion test that was riddled with grammatical errors and spelling errors.
    There is a new drive to make nursing profession more than itis. We are nurses and not doctors so the whole nursing diagnosis is a bunch B.S...I have seen enough nursing forums in this web site about topic to last me a life time. Plus Nursing Diagnosis is not the language nurses use to talk todoctors, so why bother to learn it. As far as nursing theory there is a benefit to knowing the different theorist, but I do not think it one should live and breathe it. I think having an understanding of nursing theory make one a better nurse. Nursing theory has also been talked about here to with many different options. I think if we want to improve ourselves as nurses there needs to a push improved education for nurses, so when we graduate one just does not have a general nursing degreebut a nursing degree in ICU care, oncology, or trauma. ect. so we do not have get all these certifications.
  3. 5
    Quote from wooh
    Well, I'll just hit the most important point with this FACT.
    You are not a good nurse. You aren't "less of a nurse" than I am because your views aren't similar to mine. Your views have NOTHING to do with it. You aren't "less" of a nurse. Because you aren't a nurse. You are still a STUDENT. NOT A NURSE.

    When you have a license of your own and your own patient load and are 100% responsible for those patients instead of working under the license of someone that actually is a nurse, then you can say you're a nurse. Until then, you aren't a nurse.
    You can't add ancillary requirements that do not exist like "your own patient load" to being a nurse (who said nurses have to be on the floor?) to try to discredit something you disagree with. That issue aside, the observations made do not need a license behind them to be shared, evaluated, agreed or disagreed with. There are people with licenses, both more or less educated and more or less experienced than you, that agree with him and disagree with him. Yeah?

    Whatever perspective you're trying to advance, veiled insults and sarcasm aren't helping.
  4. 7
    Quote from jbluehorseh
    We are nurses and not doctors so the whole nursing diagnosis is a bunch B.S...I have seen enough nursing forums in this web site about topic to last me a life time. Plus Nursing Diagnosis is not the language nurses use to talk todoctors, so why bother to learn it.
    Disturbed energy field r/t the field of nursing AEB color changes
    jcgrund, subee, bigsick_littlesick, and 4 others like this.
  5. 6
    Quote from veggie530
    You can't add ancillary requirements that do not exist like "your own patient load" to being a nurse (who said nurses have to be on the floor?) to try to discredit something you disagree with. That issue aside, the observations made do not need a license behind them to be shared, evaluated, agreed or disagreed with. There are people with licenses, both more or less educated and more or less experienced than you, that agree with him and disagree with him. Yeah?

    Whatever perspective you're trying to advance, veiled insults and sarcasm aren't helping.
    I think wooh has a valid point in that the OP only ever *was* a nursing student; and nursing school provides a very narrow, very skewed version of what real life nursing is like. Which is certainly to be expected. Academia has a need for self-preservation, so it necessarily harps on topics like nursing autonomy and professionalism, which often goes hand-in-hand with needing more education; and what else would academia be if it weren't for research? (Although, even in nursing, qualitative studies have never been the gold standard.)

    I've only been out of school for a little over a year, so the memories of sitting through classes and wondering "why is nursing so desperate to prove something?" are still relatively fresh. And, yes, you may end up in a real world setting like mine where nurses have endless CEU meetings, unit meetings, and committees on everything from falls to CAUTIs to VAPs -- but such things are not the be-all, end-all like they are in nursing school.

    The OP makes several valid points, but it's obvious that he's lacking any real world nursing context.
    kaliRN, RN1Each, RNFiona, and 3 others like this.
  6. 7
    Quote from RiverNurse
    Just my own musings here after an amazing spin class...

    I am glad to read your post. For change to happen, especially in nursing, conversations like this must be brought to the table. I've seen enough in nursing to know that change does need to happen. Here is why: Nurses have been bullied by physicians in the past (have you ever seen a surgeon throw a scalpel at a nurse? I have.), we have also been bullied by family members/friends (a friend of a patient once threatened to shoot me - as he went to pull something out of the bag he had with him... fortunately he was bluffing), I have been urinated on... kicked, and have had my hand nearly broken (now I have arthritis in two of my fingers due to the injury - and - I'm not even fifty years old yet! For the injuries and threats I sustained? If they were outside of the workplace, I could have easily pressed charges. However, because they happened at work, there were no repercussions. So, yes, change needs to happen.

    There was a time, not so long ago that I considered leaving. I'm glad I stayed.
    I am happy to read this post as well and I am not offended at all. I have been in nursing most of my adult life- that means a long time. I can remember being taught not to wear gloves while giving an enema because it makes the patient feel dirty (haha.) I have seen Drs throw things at nurses also and have seen the nurse having to apologize for making the Dr so mad (or get fired.) Evidence based medicine is not just a buzz word that doesn't mean anything. It is the way to practice and many many nurses refuse to embrace it. Why you do something shouldn't be because you were taught that way or because it is hospital policy. Every nurse who thinks they are a professional (and they all should) should know how to find evidence for their practice decisions. I have taught many classes on advanced nursing and can hardly get people to participate. First thing they ask is "Is this required?'

    Let's not be offended by this article. Let us thoughtfully read it and be inspired to bring nursing up to the next level. If someone tells you you have a tail you can laugh at them but if enough people telll you- you need to get a full length mirror.

    Does anyone knoe what a PICO question is? (It is THE way research is done.) Has anyone heard of the Institute of Medicine report about the Future of Nursing (published in 2010?)Medicine (AMA) had a response the next day- most nurses I have spoken to have never heard of it.How about the Robert Woods Johnson recommendations for the future of nursing? Please be informed- not just opinionated.

    And River Nurse- I'm so happy you stayed. We need you and nurses like you.
    Last edit by TheCommuter on Sep 13, '12 : Reason: quotation blocks
    OldPhatMC, SteveBuck, RNgrrl09, and 4 others like this.
  7. 2
    Quote from neverbethesame
    I have found that it is the nurses who have never worked in another field and became nurses very young that are obsessed with this.
    UNLESS they started back in the day when nursing was actually about being a nurse and not what it has devolved into now. Other than this, I agree with your points.
    LobotomyPlzThx and sherdk like this.
  8. 4
    Veggie530
    "We are nurses and not doctors so the whole nursing diagnosis is a bunch B.S...I have seen enough nursing forums in this web site about topic to last me a life time. Plus Nursing Diagnosis is not the language nurses use to talk todoctors, so why bother to learn it. "

    Disturbed energy field r/t the field of nursing AEB color changes



    thats just funnny
    Last edit by jbluehorseh on Sep 13, '12
  9. 2
    There needs to be level of respect in nursing; in school, at work, doctors to nurses,nurse to doctors and lastly nurse to nurse. I find this is lacking these days .As I said before there no need to belittle or degrade anyone. It does not makeone a better student nor a better nurse. I have been degraded by some of my instructors and my charge nurse ( this is how she treated all male nurses). It did not make me better just angry. I think that OP trying to make the point not make our profession more than it is, in trying to do so I think it hurts us more. We are nurses. We are there to help save lives make a difference. I am proud to call myself nurse.
  10. 4
    What was your reason for writing and posting this article? Where you looking for commiseration? Just venting? Hoping to change the world of nursing via a lot of griping towards an extremely small slice of specific staff nurses, nurse educators, and nursing researchers? Why even bother, since you've switched professions?

    I agree that my nursing professors were pretty much all that you described. But that just made me want to be their opposite, and I'd love to be an educator just to prove to myself that professors can be kind and helpful people.

    Like another poster said, an article with suggestions might go farther. However, I don't think you're qualified to give suggestions because your experience is extremely limited. Should you return to nursing, for some reason, you may fit in with your peers and interdisc teams by keeping your opinions a little more to yourself until you're a more established nurse -- and that IS a suggestion.
    nyteshade, xtclass08, RNFiona, and 1 other like this.


Top