New Male Nursing Student. Any Pointers?

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    I am a new male Nursing student in Jacksonville Florida, going to Jacksonville University. I start the transfer Nursing program on the 27th of this month, with orientation on the 22nd. I was hoping to get information from anyone regarding what to expect, helpful study habits, NCLEX pointers, or just anything of value. Also, how is it to work as a male nurse? Big thanks in advance!
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  3. 17 Comments so far...

  4. 2
    It’s hard to say what to expect overall. The biggest thing to expect is a lack of free time. The work load can be pretty intense at times and you have to make sacrifices in order to stay ahead. Get organized early and always try to stay ahead. As far as studying goes I would try to find people who have similar goals as you do and try to form some type of study group. It may take a semester or two to find the ones that are truly committed, but you will find them. Don’t worry about the NCLEX right now. It tests you on your ability to think like a nurse and you are not there yet. For now just focus on the semester ahead of you and take it one week at a time. If you start to look too far ahead you will burn out quickly.
    I work in the ED and there really doesn’t seem to be much of a difference in being male or female. It may be different up on the floors, but I have no desire to transfer and find out. The non-nursing staff where I work will tell you that they like working with all the guys better. They say we don’t create “drama”. Lol. The patients don’t seem to mind having a male nurse. A lot of the ones I see are in a lot of pain and they could care less if you are male or female. I hope this helps and good luck!
    KbmRN and Devon Rex like this.
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    It helps tremendously by the way and thanks. I kind of figured any real free time would be gone, especially since I am doing the accelerated route. I'm no stranger to sacrifice, but my organizational skills could use some work LOL. I was thinking of doing the study group too; it hasn't been a negative thing for me in the past so I'll roll with that. I was told that that studying for the Nursing program was a bit different than any other courses I have taken. Could you tell me in what way, and the best way you dealt with it? I will definitely hold off on the studying for the NCLEX for right now then. So the best way basically now is just to focus on the current week; maybe read a bit in advance?

    Okay so would you say it is like working any other job? Or is there maybe a bit more politics involved? The drama thing makes sense, that was one of the worries I had with working with a predominantly female ran field. I kind of thought that they had college degrees, and let most of the petty stuff go. Well, at least i have a much better picture of the scholarly and job related aspects of it. Thanks again!
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    Time management and organization skills. Make those your top priorities.

    Do not be like a dork when you start your OB rotation. Pregnant women don't like guys who act like they don't belong there. Breasts, vagina, etc. act like you've seen them before (whether or not you have, I'm just saying act as if it's no big deal -- professionalism!) and women will receive you well.

    Studying in nursing, if you're a good nurse, is much more than just memorizing random information (like anatomy). You want to know what information/knowledge implicates (if a patient has a kidney problem, don't just memorize the disease... know the pathophysiology and what meds will exasperate that, etc.)... and you have to think in terms of problem : solution, which I think may be easier for us males who like math and working on cars and that sort of thing.

    And yes, there's drama. The cool thing is that while you are a student, you're on the outside of the drama and the women will just include you in to talk about others but you won't have to really be "involved." That changes, from my understanding.
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    I echo the same sentiment, timebennifit management is essential. I'm not big on group study session but I acknowledge the benefit of participating, just seek out those who are dedicated and commited. My program strongly encourages team work and a underlying emphasis on resolving problems amongst each other. Which leads me to the next topic...DRAMA. I really hadn't expected the nonsense which "can" take place, so I think I further facilitated my own irritation as this occurred. Don't go in with the blinders on as I did it you will do fine. My class has 7 other guys and 3 of us have military backgrounds. In all an interesting mixture exist within the group and I return for the third semester on Monday. Congrats and best of luck to you.
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    Keep your study group small, otherwise it turns into a party in no time.

    For studying... your are probably in for a shock on how they test you. If Jacksonville uses Kaplan to give their "standardized tests", look for the Kaplan's NCLEX-RN Strategies for the RN Licensing exam book. It gives you hints on how to answer the questions. It might not make sense at the begining, but it will once you understand the nursing process, Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, and the ABCs (Airway, breathing, circulation).

    Get a calendar, every time you get a syllabus, write down your due dates and clinical days. That will help you stay on track. I never used to do it until nursing school... it really helps !!!

    Stay away from drama. It will only hold you back... is not worth it!

    Go with the flow of the program. Many times the institution or professors will change their mind at the last minute. Don't let that get to you. Your life will be easier if you just accept it and move on. They will make you angry at times, just don't let them notice it.

    I recommend you to not make vacation plans during your program. Stay available at all times... it might just save you from getting big headaches and problems with family.

    Be professional at all times... ESPECIALLY during your clinicals. Kiss butt and don't tell a seasoned nurse what he/she is doing is wrong. Just tell your professor. Believe me... those nurses will not hesitate in reporting you and the next thing you know is that would not be allowed to continue your clinicals in that location. I've seen it happen in Central Florida, several times.

    Be humble, learn from others (even if it's the wrong thing... as long as you recognize is wrong), be professional, prudent, wear clean scrubs, shave, look your best all the time. The hospitals will not say it, but they notice these things! Your character and disposition will make or brake you.

    Fasten your seatbelt, it's going to be a bumpy ride... but it's all worth it in the end!!!!

    Good luck to you !!!
  9. 0
    Also... believe it or not... the "Incredibly Easy" books nursing series are very good in explaining complex topics. You can find a lot of them cheaply through Amazon or other retailers. If your budget is tight, just buy a used book that is less than 5 years old.
  10. 0
    Quote from StntnInMyChallngr
    I was told that that studying for the Nursing program was a bit different than any other courses I have taken. Could you tell me in what way, and the best way you dealt with it?......So the best way basically now is just to focus on the current week; maybe read a bit in advance?
    The classes will be different. With other classes it is mostly about learning new information and being tested on it. With nursing it is more about learning new information that transforms the way you think and approach problems and then being tested on your new way of thinking. If that makes any sense. Taking it one week at a time in my opinion is the best way. It doesn't seem to be as overwhelming that way. Try to keep up with reading. It will be a lot, but it can be done. If you can stay ahead, then great. If not, don't worry about it, there will be times where there just isn't enough time. Just make sure you are current with everything and you will be okay.

    Quote from StntnInMyChallngr
    Okay so would you say it is like working any other job? Or is there maybe a bit more politics involved? The drama thing makes sense, that was one of the worries I had with working with a predominantly female ran field. I kind of thought that they had college degrees, and let most of the petty stuff go.
    It is a job and like other jobs, some days are good and some days are bad. I would imagine there is politics for sure, but I am pretty lucky where I am and we don't have too much of that going on. We do have drama, and it usually revolves around something petty, but there are a lot of guys who work in the department so it seems to balance things out a bit and we stay really busy, so there isn't a lot of time to dwell on things.

    As before, Good Luck, and keep your eye on the prize. It will go by faster than you think. If you have more questions post them and I will try to answer them the best I can.
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    I truly appreciate the pointers fro everyone, especially Aberdeen! I definitely have a much more clear picture especially now that I started my first week. Everything you guys said panned out, especially the lack of a life ( hence the reason I been absent on here ). I will check those books out, I'm down for whatever will explain the nursing field any better, not only for my GPA, but to be a better asset to my patient. So far I have taken your advice on the week by week method, and only put the first week in my iPad. Lots of reading is an understatement, I read 5 chapters due tomorrow. So far I dont know people enough to start a group, but I will try and keep it small to avoid getting off track. I see the professionalism sentiment being echoed as well, and I one-hundred percent agree. I was in the Navy for 5 years, and I think that I have the professionalism aspect down. I can see it especially in the OB portion, I've definitely seen the female anatomy, so I don't think that would be an issue. I can only speculate though, as I have never been put in that situation, but as soon as I do, I will be back on here bothering you guys again for pointers!
    I can also relate to Devon, as I have never needed a planner until now, as everything just happens so fast and dates start to run together. Also about the last minute change statement, I have seen that even in the first week; as the syllabus has changed and dates replace the TBA areas.
  12. 1
    Quote from Devon Rex
    Go with the flow of the program. Many times the institution or professors will change their mind at the last minute. Don't let that get to you. Your life will be easier if you just accept it and move on. They will make you angry at times, just don't let them notice it.

    I recommend you to not make vacation plans during your program. Stay available at all times... it might just save you from getting big headaches and problems with family.

    Be professional at all times... ESPECIALLY during your clinicals. Kiss butt and don't tell a seasoned nurse what he/she is doing is wrong. Just tell your professor. Believe me... those nurses will not hesitate in reporting you and the next thing you know is that would not be allowed to continue your clinicals in that location. I've seen it happen in Central Florida, several times.

    Be humble, learn from others (even if it's the wrong thing... as long as you recognize is wrong), be professional, prudent, wear clean scrubs, shave, look your best all the time. The hospitals will not say it, but they notice these things! Your character and disposition will make or brake you.

    Fasten your seatbelt, it's going to be a bumpy ride... but it's all worth it in the end!!!!

    Good luck to you !!!
    Thanks for the encouragement, but I will be careful not to offend the nurses; I think that may be speaking back to the professionalism you and others spoke about. To me, it would be like correcting your professor, which never goes well. I think the nurse that had the student kicked out was a little much, which goes to show the work environment of that floor. I start clinicals in the next 7 weeks, and everything you are saying here, the School Of Nursing echoed, like look your best and work your hardest, as the hospital has been known to hire JU's students after clinicals. Thanks again!!!!
    Devon Rex likes this.


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