just a thought

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    What are your views on male midwife/husbands

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  2. 12 Comments...

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    I've had thoughts of becoming one. But would I be called, now that you mention it... midhusband? Hmmm.

    Male doctors deliver babies all the time. Why not someone skilled in labor and delivery that does not have MD in his title, since midwives do it all the time.

    I want to be an L&D nurse, and I get mixed reactions from those I talk to about it. We'll see. It's been done before.

    I'm not sure what further training and education one needs to become a midhusband. Once I graduate and pass the nclex, I'll look into it. One thing at a time right now.

    ND
  4. 0
    You'd still be a midwife since that term refers to your patient's gender, not yours (midwife means "with woman"). I'd have no problem with it at all.
  5. 0
    Male ob docs have been delivering babies, and it's acceptable, why not male nurse midwives?
  6. 0
    Quote from NurseDaddy2006
    I want to be an L&D nurse, and I get mixed reactions from those I talk to about it. We'll see. It's been done before.

    I'm not sure what further training and education one needs to become a midhusband. Once I graduate and pass the nclex, I'll look into it. One thing at a time right now.

    ND
    NurseDaddy,

    I am currently an RN in the Neonatal ICU, and I LOVE it. I never thought in a million years I'd be working with 500 gram preemies, but here I am a relatively new grad learning this cool specialty. I don't know if you have done your L&D rotation, or even get a chance to go to NICU for a day or 2 [I spent a week of my practicum there], but my job encompasses the cool parts of critical care and L&D. The RN's on my floor attend all high risk [<35wk >40 wk, meconium, decels, c-sections, etc] deliveries, and are solely responsible for the baby[ies] once they're born. You and a resp therapist can be present for a 24 weeker delivery, resuscitate in the delivery room, transport back to NICU, put in umbilical, arterial and central lines [yes, we can do that] possibly resuscitate again....counsel distraught parents, actively manage the care of 2 critical patients, etc, and come back and do it again the next day, maybe with twins! So often the L&D nurses are sitting around waiting for mom to deliver, only to have us have to come manage the baby anyway. Yet we get an awesome critical care aspect. [we also can do air/ambulance transports] I always thought I'd be an ER/ICU nurse, but never NICU. 1 DAY in the nicu changed my mind. You can be saving a baby's life one minute, and get to hold a scrappy little baby while teaching it how to eat for the first time in months. Think about it! Maybe you can spend a day in a NICU.....it sure changed my mind!!!

    Good luck!

    SteveRN21 - May '05 grad
  7. 0
    Quote from SteveRN21
    So often the L&D nurses are sitting around waiting for mom to deliver, only to have us have to come manage the baby anyway.
    I know you probably don't mean that how it sounded, but I just have to say the L&D nurses aren't sitting around waiting for mom to deliver anymore than NICU nurses play with babies all day. I've worked both and heard both of those types of comments and they couldn't be farther from the truth:chuckle

    OT, but our NICU nurses don't put in umb. lines and they wouldn't be at a 24 week delivery with only an RT unless the doc was just late... I like it that way myself:chuckle
  8. 0
    I would be very uncomfortable with a male L&D nurse or midwife -- as would my fiance(well, once we're married). To be fair, though, this is also true of MD's, and I try to avoid having male doctors.

    I could be wrong, but I think that a midwife has a much closer relationship with her patient than a doc does, and that's why people have trouble conceiving of a male midwife.
  9. 0
    Quote from gaijingal
    I would be very uncomfortable with a male L&D nurse or midwife -- as would my fiance(well, once we're married). To be fair, though, this is also true of MD's, and I try to avoid having male doctors.

    I could be wrong, but I think that a midwife has a much closer relationship with her patient than a doc does, and that's why people have trouble conceiving of a male midwife.
    I have to agree with gaijingal. But, that is my personal preference, I know I have always asked for a woman doctor, and am currently seeing a midwife. When I was giving birth to my second, I was asked if a male student could come in and observe, and I said no.
    My sister, on the other hand, didn't care who was in the room when she gave birth, she said she had quite a few students in observing, and she always chose a male doctor.

    ETA: But, if that is what you want to do, you should go for it!
  10. 0
    I would have no problem with a male midwife/L&D nurse. I have always seen male doctors, although the practice I used most recently had female doctors/midwives as well. I don't think the appropriate anatomy for childbearing necessarily means one would make a better L&D nurse or midwife. For me, it's all about the nurses skill and compassion.

    That being said, if you do decide to go this route, I am sure there will be times when patients are not as open to a male caregiver in this situation. But, if you are a midwife, you would have contact with your patients during prenatal care, so it wouldn't exactly be a surprise.
  11. 0
    my OB doc was a male. i also had the choice of a female midwife who showed absolutely no compassion so i went with the male doc. my husband adored him because he really involved him. although i am the one who endured 7 months of vomiting and 41 1/2 hours of labor, my doc made it feel as though my husband and i were both pregnant.
    go for it!!!!!!!!!!


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