Help - what is the easiest floor to work

  1. Hi,iam a male nursing student i wonder what is the most easiest floor to work on i prefer routine work that does not require to much analysis just give medication and iv lines the simple stuff no needing analysis like in the ICU, ER,CCU they told me dialysis, OR,are great floors for me iam actually a really cold person not emotional i also do not mind working extra hours for me physical work is easier then mental work .I also want want a floor that will allow me to have time to progress and stop handling patients and sit behind a desk nursing is all i have it is the best choice to financialy escape poverty i only wnt to become good in it for the money that is the truth
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  2. 20 Comments

  3. by   TuesdaysChild
    Are you already in a nursing program or still working on pre-requisites to apply for admission? Is the above suggestions from your nursing instructors?
    Last edit by TuesdaysChild on Nov 6, '16
  4. by   AlmostANurse321
    You don't want to think analytically about your patient care, you're cold emotionally, you want to sit behind a desk, and you're in it for the money. Have you thought this through, and do you understand what nurses actually do?

    You can't pass a medication, without thinking analytically about it. You're legally responsible for the medications you give, even though the MD/NP/PA prescribes it.

    As far as being emotionally cold, learn to fake warmth. Even if you work in the OR, your school clinicals will require patient care on a Med-Surg floor. Desk jobs are coveted, if you can't do the analytical and human relationship side of nursing it's going to be hard to build the reputation you need to move up the ladder.

    But maybe I'm prejudiced against people who enter the profession only for the money, because I've seen too many of them and they are the last nurses I'd want taking care of my loved ones.
  5. by   Rose_Queen
    Quote from AlmostANurse321
    As far as being emotionally cold, learn to fake warmth. Even if you work in the OR, your school clinicals will require patient care on a Med-Surg floor.
    Even in the OR, you need to be able to gain the trust of your patient, and you only have a few minutes to do it. You do need to have people skills even in the OR.
    But maybe I'm prejudiced against people who enter the profession only for the money, because I've seen too many of them and they are the last nurses I'd want taking care of my loved ones.
    And I've seen too many nurses who only have the calling either fail because they don't have the clinical finesse or burn out because the reality of nursing is not what they expected. I don't care what the reason is someone is in nursing as long as they are competent at their job.
  6. by   Horseshoe
    You want "easy," you don't want to have to "think," and you don't believe in punctuation.

    I don't think nursing is for you, and I don't ever say that lightly. There might be some end point after you have gained "traditional experience" that could put you behind a desk, away from patients. However, I don't believe that any nursing job, even those that do not involve bedside care, can provide you with an environment that will free you from the responsibilities of analysis and mental work.
  7. by   AliNajaCat
    This is a joke, right? "I want to be a nurse but I don't want to think, do anything important, work with people, communicate professionally, or anything like that, I just want a paycheck."

    What the heck do you think we do, anyway?

    Short answer: do something else. There are no jobs like that in nursing, and anyway, you certainly won't be able to get past a semester of nursing school trying to work like that.
  8. by   Extra Pickles
    if you prefer physical work to mental work then have you considered joining a landscaping crew? I don't mean to be funny I'm being honest, you don't have a single desire to be a nurse you are looking for a steady paycheck. You won't find work or keep it as a nurse with your view of nursing so you'd probably be better off looking for something that involves manual labor and doesn't rely on social interaction.

    If this is a genuine post and not a pot-stirring fishing expedition I'd say it's time to cut losses, get out of nursing school, and get a job doing physical labor where you mostly work on your own and as long as you complete specific tasks you get another set of tasks and then go home.
  9. by   TuesdaysChild
    Not sure if you're still reading this (or if this is a joke), but the reason I asked if you were actually in a nursing program is that I have a hunch that you're not yet in one. There are people in nursing who aren't partial to the bedside because people's emotions are a drain for them. And that's perfectly okay. However... you say you're cold AND you don't want to analyze AND you prefer physical/routine to "mental work". The deck is really starting to stack against you, my friend.

    One thing I that came to mind, and this is just another hunch (might as well roll with the hunches!! Okay.... that was corny), your username "gears83" makes me think of "gearhead", like... maybe you're into cars? I could be wrong about that, but if that's the case, you should look into being a high-end automotive technician. Get some auto tech training at a vocational school and then go into a training program with BMW/Mercedes/Lexis, etc. In-house techs at luxury auto dealers are paid well, have a nice workspace, don't deal with customers, and only requires light analysis since there is diagnostic equipment that does the heavy mental lifting.

    Otherwise, maybe talk to your school's vocational counselor. I guarantee you nursing is not your *only* option out of poverty.
  10. by   HouTx
    I think the basic message from PPs is accurate, even though some may be a bit harsh.

    In today's healthcare climate, jobs that do not require RN-level analytical skills are going to be filled with lesser qualified staff. Simple economics, no one's going to pay RN salaries for a job that does not require higher-level skills.
  11. by   Esme12
    Quote from gears83
    Hi,iam a male nursing student i wonder what is the most easiest floor to work on i prefer routine work that does not require to much analysis just give medication and iv lines the simple stuff no needing analysis like in the ICU, ER,CCU they told me dialysis, OR,are great floors for me iam actually a really cold person not emotional i also do not mind working extra hours for me physical work is easier then mental work .I also want want a floor that will allow me to have time to progress and stop handling patients and sit behind a desk nursing is all i have it is the best choice to financialy escape poverty i only wnt to become good in it for the money that is the truth
    Welcome to AN! The largest online nursing community!

    A nursing student....what semester are you? Have you been on the floor yet? If you haven't been on the floor yet maybe wait and see what appeals to you. While I don't every nurse is sworn to serve...I do believe that to enter nursing you need to at least like people, have empathy and compassion. You may want to seek out a technology field for even passing meds requires analytical thinking.

    Tell us a little more....
  12. by   Ackeem
    Troll, troll, troll

    If not troll, please just go, regardless just go.
  13. by   OrganizedChaos
    Wow. Please don't go into nursing, it clearly isn't for you. What makes you think you won't have to analyze or help patients if you work behind a desk? No matter where you go in nursing you need to have empathy for the patient, or at least feign it.

    You sound like my ex-best friend. She also is cold & not one for emotions. She got into an ABSN program, excelled & then (eventually, that's another story for another time) became a practicing nurse. She only worked as a nurse for 3 months. She took someone's space away from them (in nursing school) only to quit nursing all together. I knew she would hate it & she still talks about how horrible nursing is. She even tried to talk me out of getting my RN. I've been a nurse longer than she was in school.
  14. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from AlmostANurse321
    But maybe I'm prejudiced against people who enter the profession only for the money, because I've seen too many of them and they are the last nurses I'd want taking care of my loved ones.
    We are all in it for the money to a certain extent, unless one would willingly work as a nurse unpaid for 40 hours every week during the span of an entire career.

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