Graduating in Nursing from an all female college - page 2

would you go to an all-women school that allows men into their nursing program? i thought about it but i think i'll pass.... Read More

  1. by   neenja
    true but if i want to study in the library (just for random example), there wouldnt be a big *** is he doing here reaction at a regular campus. im pretty sure the students at the all-female wanted to go all-female because they prefer the company of womens only.
  2. by   ewattsjt
    are you kidding? you are embarking into a profession that is predominately female. if you can’t handle what you perceive the women to think at a library; you wouldn’t tolerate what they may think at the facility you would hire into. remember that not only will most your co workers be female; most your bosses will be female too.

    i personally like it. i worked construction and truck driving for several years, worked in a factory and now work in surgery. being surrounded by women is great!!! sometimes there is too much drama but still overall great.

    have you had interpersonal communication or psychology to see how and why you have apprehensions about relationships (in or out of school) with women or other races? while it is hard to get into many programs, it seems as though you need to overcome this anxiety first. nursing programs need your full attention for success.

    if it puts your mind at ease, most (not all) women are far better classmates and co workers than men (except when they want you to do all the lifting lol).
  3. by   neenja
    what are you kidding me? apprenhension about women and races? i dont think you read the thread.
  4. by   thenurse2b08
    this should not matter. And stop living for people, start living for yourself
  5. by   TPS360
    its really hard to get into a nursing program in my county of residence.i will deiniely apply to an all female school.There is nothing wrong.
  6. by   Kevin RN08
    Quote from ewattsjt
    are you kidding? you are embarking into a profession that is predominately female. if you can't handle what you perceive the women to think at a library; you wouldn't tolerate what they may think at the facility you would hire into. remember that not only will most your co workers be female; most your bosses will be female too.

    i personally like it. i worked construction and truck driving for several years, worked in a factory and now work in surgery. being surrounded by women is great!!! sometimes there is too much drama but still overall great.

    have you had interpersonal communication or psychology to see how and why you have apprehensions about relationships (in or out of school) with women or other races? while it is hard to get into many programs, it seems as though you need to overcome this anxiety first. nursing programs need your full attention for success.

    if it puts your mind at ease, most (not all) women are far better classmates and co workers than men (except when they want you to do all the lifting lol).
    as a man, yes. but nothing is worse than seeing the way many women clique and are real backstabbers to each other.

    we were talking about this in clinical the other day, many of the women (student, staff, and hospital staff) felt that having a man on the floor seemed to calm much of the in-fighting that takes place in an all-women's environment.
    i know in my last job, in a gov't comptrollers office, i was told that i brought a calming effect to the office. some may be the traditional paternal behaviors we have, or it could be biological.
  7. by   abooker
    In my LPN class of 60 students, there were very few men. The slim wrestler with big muslces got flirted with, and some disgruntled females said he received special treatment during clinicals from the nursing faculty because he was male. I don't know; I never worked with him in clinicals.

    A shy, overweight guy who looked about 16 got dragged to a strip club by some older women (doesn't make sense, does it?) who exposed him in public. He was teased a lot, because he had a tendency to turn beet-red when anything sexual was mentioned. I was in clinicals with him, which I am grateful for because he taught me by example - an unconscious patient with a foley and a foreskin who desperately, desperately needed help with personal care. If this guy hadn't fixed the problem in front of me, I wouldn't have been able to prevent the problem for male nursing home residents. (I'm female, and I didn't know ... )

    I got to know the Marine Corps guy fairly well; he sat behind me and I know he had some "culture shock" because of the stuff he would mutter under his breath when clique members would argue and backstab and play social dominance games with the instructors over a point or two on an exam. He tried to introduce some rationality and some civility at times, but the clique leader always cranked up the drama at this point, escalated the confrontation, and then accused him of picking a fight.

    I suppose it is trite to say this, but every experience will be unique.
  8. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from neenja
    true but if i want to study in the library (just for random example), there wouldnt be a big *** is he doing here reaction at a regular campus. im pretty sure the students at the all-female wanted to go all-female because they prefer the company of womens only.
    I think you might be overestimating the interest your presence in the library would attract. When I went to the library, it was to study. I didn't concern myself with who else was at the library or the purpose of their presence there.

    Women who have opted for an all female campus do so for a number of reasons. Their parents might have said that's the school for which they'll pay. It could be a family tradition. It could have a unique major. They could've been given a scholarship. They might love the campus. All the same reasons anyone uses to decide which school is right for them.
  9. by   frail316
    I guess the real question is: are you secure enough to be the only guy there? The answer to that is the answer to your question.

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