Check your manliness at the door... - page 2

by Floridatrail2006

5,940 Views | 22 Comments

Just wanted to say that I have personally had a great experience both in the nursing program and in clinicals be a male student. When I initially started, I was concerned going into a female dominated field. However, overall, I... Read More


  1. 1
    Thank you for sharing your insights. I am starting the BSN program in August, and I will review your suggestions many times - I printed out a copy to slip into my stack of textbooks :-)
    Wild Irish LPN likes this.
  2. 0
    Quote from Bob_N_VA
    Good article. My only comment about the "manliness" is that maybe a better term would be "macho" or "machismo" if you want to be technically correct. That type of behavior or attitude has no place in a clinical setting. I don't think you can turn off you sexual identity but for sure you can tone down your sexuality. A professional attitude toward your patients and coworkers is what should be front and center. And sometimes biting your lip and keeping quiet is a skill we should all learn to make better use of.
    I agree. I suppose the terminology is confusing. I should've compared the meaning of macho Vs. Machismo Vs. Manly Vs. Manliness. I hope I haven't offended anyone. Just reporting my thoughts and experiences.

    I can't tell how many times I have not talked and have gotten great information from the patient. I read some article that it takes so many seconds for someone to describe his or her's feelings. Like 10 seconds or something. Anyway, I ask focus questioned and allow the patient to express himself or herself. Thanks for your thought.

    Isn't "machismo" Italian? Just wondering.
  3. 1
    Well I'm 52 now and graduated with my RN 30 years ago at age 22, and I teach in a 4 year BSN program. I went back to university twice for my degrees cuz I originally did a 3 year hospital diploma RN program.

    For those young guys who have commented on this article, the author is correct, and so are the others who have commented. Yes patients do react to men differently when we are nurses. There has been a lot of research done on men in nursing and how there is a reverse gender bias towards us.

    Where I teach we have two intakes a year of 72 students in September and January and 7-8 are males in each class. 30 years later, 95% of the profession remains female, 5% male. I admire the author for writing this for guys aspiring or thinking about nursing as a career.

    The person who commented on teamwork is right on. I also think that today's generation needs reminding on being polite because some students- male and female- when they start nursing programs got a real attitude problem and its a shock for some to learn that its not all about them anymore, that its about taking care of sick vulnerable people.

    When you think about it, its actually a privilege to nurse sick people. You have to be smart, use your brain and learn new things every shift you work. You meet people from all walks of life. Their stories are gut wrenching sometimes. As an RN myself, and male, thanks for the article. Great food for thought! I've lost count of so many people saying to me after nursing 25 years and now teaching that I'm not really nursing anymore as I chase 8 students down 2 wards for 288 hours of clinical every term.

    For the men reading this? Those of us doing this love it. Yes we have bad days but its worth it!
    Wild Irish LPN likes this.
  4. 0
    Quote from yvrnurse
    Well I'm 52 now and graduated with my RN 30 years ago at age 22, and I teach in a 4 year BSN program. I went back to university twice for my degrees cuz I originally did a 3 year hospital diploma RN program.

    For those young guys who have commented on this article, the author is correct, and so are the others who have commented. Yes patients do react to men differently when we are nurses. There has been a lot of research done on men in nursing and how there is a reverse gender bias towards us.

    Where I teach we have two intakes a year of 72 students in September and January and 7-8 are males in each class. 30 years later, 95% of the profession remains female, 5% male. I admire the author for writing this for guys aspiring or thinking about nursing as a career.

    The person who commented on teamwork is right on. I also think that today's generation needs reminding on being polite because some students- male and female- when they start nursing programs got a real attitude problem and its a shock for some to learn that its not all about them anymore, that its about taking care of sick vulnerable people.

    When you think about it, its actually a privilege to nurse sick people. You have to be smart, use your brain and learn new things every shift you work. You meet people from all walks of life. Their stories are gut wrenching sometimes. As an RN myself, and male, thanks for the article. Great food for thought! I've lost count of so many people saying to me after nursing 25 years and now teaching that I'm not really nursing anymore as I chase 8 students down 2 wards for 288 hours of clinical every term.

    For the men reading this? Those of us doing this love it. Yes we have bad days but its worth it!
    Thank you for your thoughts. I felt the need to say these things. I find it interesting that I'm 24 and yet, I notice these small courtesies that maybe others do not. But, I guess more importantly, what I wrote about and what I do is really second nature. Like breathing, I try to do this automatically. I guess I'm naturally friendly. While I do have an egocentric side, I really try to "tame that lion" inside and try to be humble each day.

    I also find it interesting that I notice the generation beneath me lacks these characteristics. It's like that cliche that an older generation notices the prior generation is rude, disrespectful, or whatever. However, it's not only the generation beneath me, it's also my generation as well. Anyway. I guess I can't change everyone. Just focus on myself and spread the message around. Maybe one or two may pick it up.

    I learned very quickly on that I'm in an element that requires years and years of skill to master. As you said, people learn every shift of every day.

    I wrote some other stuff awhile back about volunteering. I believe I mentioned the privilege and honor we have and the position we are in. It's not always about the money. It's about the opportunity and blessing. Take care!
  5. 0
    Quote from NatureNerd
    Thank you for sharing your insights. I am starting the BSN program in August, and I will review your suggestions many times - I printed out a copy to slip into my stack of textbooks :-)
    Thanks for reading! I don't think anyone has printed out my writing before. I hope you find it useful and good luck in your endeavors!
  6. 2
    Well I'm 52 now and graduated with my RN 30 years ago at age 22, and I teach in a 4 year BSN program. I went back to university twice for my degrees cuz I originally did a 3 year hospital diploma RN program.

    For those young guys who have commented on this article, the author is correct, and so are the others who have commented. Yes patients do react to men differently when we are nurses. There has been a lot of research done on men in nursing and how there is a reverse gender bias towards us.

    Where I teach we have two intakes a year of 72 students in September and January and 7-8 are males in each class. 30 years later, 95% of the profession remains female, 5% male. I admire the author for writing this for guys aspiring or thinking about nursing as a career.

    The person who commented on teamwork is right on. I also think that today's generation needs reminding on being polite because some students- male and female- when they start nursing programs got a real attitude problem and its a shock for some to learn that its not all about them anymore, that its about taking care of sick vulnerable people.

    When you think about it, its actually a privilege to nurse sick people. You have to be smart, use your brain and learn new things every shift you work. You meet people from all walks of life. Their stories are gut wrenching sometimes. As an RN myself, and male, thanks for the article. Great food for thought! I've lost count of so many people saying to me after nursing 25 years and now teaching that I'm not really nursing anymore as I chase 8 students down 2 wards for 288 hours of clinical every term.

    For the men reading this? Those of us doing this love it. Yes we have bad days but its worth it!
    Firstly thank you for being an RN all us guys can aspire to be.

    As a guy studying Nursing i think [like most guys] i had alittle shock moment when i went into my first nursing class and saw how so many of my class were girls. I had done some research on it before hand and knew that being a guy i would be hopelessly outnumbered but it was still a suprise moment initially but now ive gotten over it and moved on with my studies.

    I have encountered bias while on clinicals but i view it as a challenge to prove to my patients that as a guy i can look after them to the same extent that a female nurse can, and in most cases i do, and to go back to patients and know that they have accepted me as their nurse is a proud moment for me.

    At no time did i [during my time on the wards] stop being a man or be "manly". I wasnt loud or marcho i was me, and i personally consider it one of my greatest strengths as a male studying nursing. It deffinitly makes me different than most of the nurses on the ward and ive had most of them inform me that that is exactly why they love having male nursing working with them.

    perhapse its just a different culture down here in NZ
    Wild Irish LPN and armada14 like this.
  7. 0
    I would never want to work with you. This article makes you sound like you have some emotional issues that make you desperate for approval. I am assuming that you are a younger person because a lot of the sins you try to pin on men are actually equally liable to happen with both sexes and if you are offended by a male classmate telling dirty jokes wait until you start spending 12 hours a day with women. Shocking
  8. 3
    E. Niles

    I forgot that I was indirectly asking for a psychiatric evaluation. So, by saying, "Smile, be friendly, greet people respectfully and formally, and check one's manliness" must mean I have emotional issues. You've lost the meaning of the whole message. Can't please everyone.
    Last edit by Floridatrail2006 on Apr 23, '12
    iwant2b1, Chinook2, and armada14 like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from Kiwiguy
    Firstly thank you for being an RN all us guys can aspire to be.

    As a guy studying Nursing i think [like most guys] i had alittle shock moment when i went into my first nursing class and saw how so many of my class were girls. I had done some research on it before hand and knew that being a guy i would be hopelessly outnumbered but it was still a suprise moment initially but now ive gotten over it and moved on with my studies.

    I have encountered bias while on clinicals but i view it as a challenge to prove to my patients that as a guy i can look after them to the same extent that a female nurse can, and in most cases i do, and to go back to patients and know that they have accepted me as their nurse is a proud moment for me.

    At no time did i [during my time on the wards] stop being a man or be "manly". I wasnt loud or marcho i was me, and i personally consider it one of my greatest strengths as a male studying nursing. It deffinitly makes me different than most of the nurses on the ward and ive had most of them inform me that that is exactly why they love having male nursing working with them.

    perhapse its just a different culture down here in NZ
    I agree with you. I think men add a different feel the nursing realm. A positive addition. I was trying to point out the characteristics in which many are taught growing up through one's family, friends, co-workers, or generally, society at large. There are many gender characteristics that one needs to be mindful of. Hence, why I said, "Check your manliness at the door."

    I feel like there are folks that feel like I'm saying, "Stop being a man." This isn't true. Just like women, we are taught these things whether one is personally aware or not. I was trying to relay the message.
  10. 0
    Great Read!....as one of only a handful of guy's in my entire program I too thought my transition into "a woman dominated field" would be a challenge....I have found it to be quite easy actually, mutual respect is always paid both ways with my fellow nursing classmates....we (being men), have a different spin on things in my opinion.....the sexes each have very complimentary traits that work well together, I have yet to have a bad experience with any of my clinical classmates/Instuctors or staff nurses....it has been all good and I see no reason why that would change when I hit "The Real World" of nursing.....Thanks ladies!....


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