Advantages to being a male nurse

  1. 3
    i figured i'd write this due to all the questions in these forums by males wondering about male nursing stereotypes, if it's going to be harder being a male nurse, if male nurses get the same employment opportunities and so on.

    these are my experiences and those of the guy nurses i know, there's a bunch of generalities, so don't get your (guys and gals) feelings hurt:

    1. NURSING SCHOOL

    a. some schools give males more ranking pts for admission, just because you're a guy (they want more guys)

    b. faculty and administration personally thanked me and the other guys on numerous occassions (in front of the female students) for wanting to be nurses (because employers in the area told them that's what they wanted, more male nurses)

    c. you will see some female students really struggle with some of the physical demands (moving patients, etc), not as much of a problem for most guys (we are stronger). one less thing a guy student has to worry about during labs/clinicals


    2. EMPLOYMENT

    a. as stated above, my experience has been that employers prefer male nurses
    why? it's basically all about money to employers

    I. males don't get pregnant (less missed work, $$$)

    II. males don't generally deal with the children, wifey does (again, less missed work)

    III. males in general are stronger, we can do more (aka the human forklift)

    IV. relates to the strength thing again, less employee lifting/moving injuries and patient injuries (don't drop a patient)

    V. males don't have the goods women do (uti, pap, mammo, etc), so we miss less work due to doc visits


    3. STEREOTYPES OF MALE NURSES
    too many guys seem to worry about these (mainly the 1st one), who cares

    a. gay, if you're gay great, if not get over it if someone thinks you're gay just because you're a nurse
    I. most of the "are you gay" stuff i've run into, is either from a gay guy asking me or a women as her subtle way of saying i'm ok in her eyes, either way it's flattering

    b. too dumb to be a doc, they're probably right, lol (they clearly don't know many doc's)

    c. nursing isn't a calling for a male, it's just a job (probably right again, haha)

    d. you're a doc (just because i'm a male taking care of patients doesn't mean i'm a doc, i just play one on tv, lol)

    e. womanizer or whatever you wanna call it, being a man (women don't seem to compute this a much as guys do, working with 90% women speaks for itself)
    marley44, b0rea1is, and Josh.P like this.
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  4. 26 Comments so far...

  5. 2
    Just because we are on average stronger, or at least taller and have better leverage, does not mean we should act as human forklifts. I don't want to be an orthopedic patient by the time I'm 30.
    PatMac10,RN and IHeartNursing321 like this.
  6. 0
    a. as stated above, my experience has been that employers prefer male nurses
    why? it's basically all about money to employers
    This is one stereotype I hope can land me a job even as a new grad ... well I wouldn't call it stereotype as more of discrimination o_O ...
  7. 1
    No question...this potential discrimination bothers me intellectually, but I am certainly going to take advantage of it if I can. Then again, I can reason myself through it. For a long time women didn't really become firefighters or police, and then, when they did, departments started establishing what I guess you'd have to call quotas for them. In some cases physical requirements in academies being relaxed for female cadets.

    We're certainly not getting anything relaxed for us, but I certainly appreciate the leg up...or I will if I get it.

    Dude, excellent, candid overview btw.
    kntdoneyet likes this.
  8. 0
    I'm an STNA and a nursing student. The physical advantages are a huge benefit for me. I generally don't have problems ambulating residents nor do I worry at all about dropping them. However, they do stick me on more physically-demanding assignments, and help from female staff (esp Nurses) is hard to get. The 350 lb man who falls on the floor and is too heavy for the lift, is only ever going to be lifted by the few males who happen to be lurk about. However, there are some female nurses where I work who are much stronger than me. They are also on average a good 3 or 4 inches taller than me.

    About the stereotypes, I have had my sexual preference called into question on a number of occasions. It is usually asked by angry and confused residents who don't particularly like healthcare professionals anyway. My way around this: don't talk with a lisp or wear tight-fitting scrubs or scrubs with decorations on them. I'll admit I'm not as smart as a doctor, even if I have a 3.9 GPA. I know lots of doctors personally, and us normal folk shouldn't even compare ourselves with them. Nursing is not a calling, it's a vocation! In recent years, Johnson & Johnson has done a great job promoting the nursing profession. It definitely takes a certain person to want to pursue a nursing career. However, I don't see it as some divine partnership with God to serve humanity nor would I even put it into the ministry category. Womanizing? I can certainly see how people could come up with that. But I don't think the womanizers would last long in the nursing profession. I know that the female nurses I work with would not put up with that crap at all.

    Overall, I think we hold some advantages. But a lot of the innate nursing characteristics come naturally with the female nurses. On average, they are more caring and empathetic than I could ever hope to be.
  9. 0
    Quote from ItsTheDude

    1. NURSING SCHOOL

    a. some schools give males more ranking pts for admission, just because you're a guy (they want more guys)

    c. you will see some female students really struggle with some of the physical demands (moving patients, etc), not as much of a problem for most guys (we are stronger). one less thing a guy student has to worry about during labs/clinicals


    2. EMPLOYMENT

    a. as stated above, my experience has been that employers prefer male nurses
    why? it's basically all about money to employers


    III. males in general are stronger, we can do more (aka the human forklift)

    IV. relates to the strength thing again, less employee lifting/moving injuries and patient injuries (don't drop a patient)


    3. STEREOTYPES OF MALE NURSES

    a. gay, if you're gay great, if not get over it if someone thinks you're gay just because you're a nurse
    I. most of the "are you gay" stuff i've run into, is either from a gay guy asking me or a women as her subtle way of saying i'm ok in her eyes, either way it's flattering

    d. you're a doc (just because i'm a male taking care of patients doesn't mean i'm a doc, i just play one on tv, lol)
    No offense taken at all Dude. But I thought I'd chime in on the stuff that I have experience with-

    As far as I know my school had no preference for male applicants. MY class was about 20% male. However I was, for the first and probably last time, able to apply for and recieve a substantial minority student scholarship because I'm a white male.

    I don't know if the female students I worked with struggled any more than I did. Of course they were mostly girls in their mid-20's and I'm 39.

    Employment- I am not a human forklift and I don't impersonate one. Ever. I am unfortuante to have a couple of herniated lumbar disks, so I am very careful about lifts. I for darn sure won't pick somebody off the floor by myself and if I'm ever in a bind for moving someone I use a mechanical lift. Sure, it's tough on my button push9ing finger, but I can still gut it out for the rest of the day.

    Frankly I see more of the female nurses trying to "muscle up" and lift pts the hard way.

    Stereotypes

    The only person who ever said anything about me being gay was the husband of an instructor. She and I were talking one day and she said her husband asked if there were any men in her clinical section. She said one. I then asked if he wondered if I was gay. She said yes, and that she didn't think so (what with wearing a wedding ring, talking about my wife and daughter from time to time). I didn't care one way or the other. The only person who really cares that I'm not gay is my wife. And she's the only person that I'd care about caring.

    I'm not a Doc, although I sometimes get asked. Usually it's by older patients who are a little confused. No one has seemed to care that I'm not once they learn the truth.

    Anyway, that's my two cents.
  10. 1
    the girls my man. there's an endless amount of chicks you can pick to choose from as a male nurse.
    RichardFutureNurse likes this.
  11. 0
    I'm kind of looking forwards to being a human forklift if I live long enough to find a school. It's an easy way to help, doesn't take a lot of time like some other "you got a minute?" queries, plus I've got this great Lift Team t-shirt idea...
  12. 0
    You left one thing out in the employment category. I have seen employers look toward male employees for that sense of "in charge", "leadership", "emotional stability". At one place the male LVN was in charge of night shift as the house supervisor even though there was at least one RN on duty most of the time. At other times, I noticed a distinct way that men were sought out for hire and treated by those in administration. Hard to put a finger on, but you can notice it when you see it.
  13. 0
    need some help here


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