Accepted! Now what? - page 2

Alright guys, help me out.... I've been trolling these forums for so long, and it dawned on me: I know everything there is to know about how to get accepted to nursing school.... And that's about it!... Read More

  1. Visit  ringmasterjdp} profile page
    1
    As a fellow male student about to start the nursing program this Fall, I would like to thank you all for answering this gentlemans question and giving us a good foundation to start on.

    Jason
    besaangel likes this.
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  3. Visit  malestunurse} profile page
    0
    Quote from algebra_demystified
    The endocrine system. All of it. Every last detail.
    Woah don't freak the guy out he isn't going to medical school to become an endocrinologist.
  4. Visit  veggie530} profile page
    1
    Find people at your institution one semester ahead of you for inside tips and tricks.
    Gootie likes this.
  5. Visit  veggie530} profile page
    0
    Quote from malestunurse
    Woah don't freak the guy out he isn't going to medical school to become an endocrinologist.
    You know what, though... if you know a lot about cardiac, respiratory and endo, you're pretty set.
  6. Visit  veggie530} profile page
    0
    Quote from cHaNkStA
    Be ready to in an environment where the ratio is 8:1
    high five!
  7. Visit  seanynjboy} profile page
    0
    Quote from malestunurse
    Woah don't freak the guy out he isn't going to medical school to become an endocrinologist.
    Sad thing is...HE IS RIGHT...Endocrine is one of the hardest systems in my opinion. I took a few Kaplan Nursing Exams and a lot of the questions had to do with Endocrine. Mostly diabetes. If you should know inside and out of one specific endocrine disorder...It would be diabetes mellitus type I and II. Pathophysiology, meds, insulin onset, peaks and durations, foot care, PVD, and all the secondary characteristics.
  8. Visit  seanynjboy} profile page
    1
    Quote from veggie530
    Find people at your institution one semester ahead of you for inside tips and tricks.
    That is some AWESOME advice. I know a few people in the class ahead of me and they have helped me soooo much They just graduated today...I will miss them
    sweetgeorgia likes this.
  9. Visit  algebra_demystified} profile page
    0
    I left something out. Nervous system receptors. Opioid, muscarinic, nicotinic, etc. Get to know all of them very well, they will come up again and again and again. The most important part of studying the nervous system is to remember that as you go down the system, you will be absolutely convinced that this or that detail can't possibly be important. You basically need to know X. If you know X, you should be good to go. It definitely seems that way when it's just you and the book. The problem is, it's only by going all the way down to the finest granularity of detail in your 100 level community college anatomy and physiology courses will you learn what you need to know later.

    You don't realize it when you're taking anatomy and physiology. It seems like minutiae at the time. How can we possibly be expected to remember the difference between a mu receptor and a K receptor? Come on, I'm not really going to have to know this to be functional as a nurse. Guess what? If you want to be a good nurse, you will consider that kind of thing to be basic knowledge that everybody should have. How could you not know the difference between a mu and a K receptor, and what kind of medications work for a given patient based on which receptors are triggered?

    If you learn it right the first time, you'll sail through the rest of your schooling with SO much less trouble. Anatomy and physiology are key courses. I'm so glad I spent 3-5 hours a day seven days a week studying for those classes. It made everything else so much easier.

    To the contributor above, I think that nurses ARE going to medical school to become endocrinologists. I don't think of myself as being a grunt medical worker, I think of myself as a medical professional. I haven't been to "medical school" but I don't think that means I haven't studied medicine. I'm working on my Masters now pursuant to a PMHNP certification, and I better know my stuff before I start prescribing psychiatric medications to unstable veterans with years of experience in killing people.

    Part of the reason I'm continuing my medical education is because I am not satisfied with transferring calls and transcribing orders, making sure that the physician's orders page has a sticker on each section of the yellow carbon page, and a million other things that can be done by anyone with an 8th grade education. I expect more from myself, and wish my coworkers expected more of themselves. I'm finally dialled in enough in my current workplace that I can get out from behind the nurses' station desk and spend at least 25% of my time interacting with the patients. My goal is 50%, and I can kind of see it from here. That's pushing it, but I think I can get there.

    Scraping by is lame.
  10. Visit  canadiandude} profile page
    0
    Say goodbye to your social life

    and

    ... Good Luck
  11. Visit  Nguyenchester} profile page
    0
    Learn how to calm down and just take things a step at a time. It's not as serious as people make it out to be sometimes. You can still have some sort of social life and get the grades you need. About to be finished with the program and I realized that I was worrying too much for no good reason. Do whatever works for you before you got accepted. Classmates of all various demographics and ranges still read the book, cram, or do what they did to study originally. It's what worked for them and they are still in it thus far.
  12. Visit  deepthought} profile page
    0
    Quote from Nguyenchester
    Learn how to calm down and just take things a step at a time. It's not as serious as people make it out to be sometimes. You can still have some sort of social life and get the grades you need. About to be finished with the program and I realized that I was worrying too much for no good reason. Do whatever works for you before you got accepted. Classmates of all various demographics and ranges still read the book, cram, or do what they did to study originally. It's what worked for them and they are still in it thus far.
    BINGO!! We got a winner, this is solid advice. Don’ttry and change the way you learn or retain new information because you seefellow students doing it another way. We all have inherent styles of learning.

    there are three basic types of learning styles. The three most common arevisual, auditory, and kinesthetic. To learn, we depend on our senses to processthe information around us. Most people tend to use one of their senses morethan the others. It is not unusual to use different learning styles fordifferent tasks. That's why people can respond so differently to the samething.

    In the same way you will model the behaviors’ of the nurses you will eventuallywork with you should seek out the top students in your classes. Naturally youwill find yourself picking up the skills and behaviors’ that allow them to performat that higher level.
  13. Visit  mmills63} profile page
    0
    Thanks for the advice everyone! I'm in the thick of it now... got a B on my first Fundamentals exam; next one is coming up fast! I bought a digital voice recroder and started recording the lectures to listen to them again over the weekend (doen't make my weekend any more fun, but I htin kit will help with learning material). I learned quickly that I wasn't going ot be able to read the entire assigned reading (300 pages of reading in one week.... seriously Professor?), and even when i tried, I didn't retain much of it. I'm studying from the PowerPoints, and going through the chapters with emphasis placed on the portions that were discussed in lecture.

    At least I enjoy studying nursing and patient care.... Otherwise this would suck!
  14. Visit  Jory} profile page
    0
    Quote from mmills63
    Alright guys, help me out.... I've been trolling these forums for so long, and it dawned on me: I know everything there is to know about how to get accepted to nursing school.... And that's about it! So I got my acceptance letter in the mail over the weekend and I can put all that behind me.

    I suppose that was the easy part... Now I have to pass nursing school! Tips, tricks, or advice?
    Here is my advice:

    Forget everything you know about testing or studying...these skills apply, but differently, in nursing school.

    Never, ever miss class. I am serious about that. Nursing schools attract very bright students. They are used to not going to class, just reading the book, start studying a few days before class and getting an A on a test....that won't work in nursing school.

    The most valuable part of nursing school lectures are the scenarios the instructors give you. They really bring a visual to what you are doing and give you insight to how your thought process should be.

    The tests are on information that will be new...drugs you have never heard of, equipment that you have never seen, labs that you have never done. That is why class and reading is important. Test answers are not obvious...all 4 can be correct...you have to pick which one is the most correct, the action you would do first, etc. After the first couple, you'll get it.

    The best advice I got on this message board when I just lurked was that several posted that their FIRST SEMESTER, they got a Saunders NCLEX Book...I did test question after test question on whatever we were covering and I was happy to share what I was doing with others....b/c my grades were much higher than my peers. The ones that didn't want to put in the work, still partied on weekends, put their boyfriends #1, were gone after the first semester or two.

    I would also make friends with the local hospital recruiter. Call and find out what they look for in new graduates...find out what sets them apart in hiring...this is valuable insight on what you can do while in school so your resume isn't like every other new grad applying for jobs. Every geographical area is different....find out what the needs are in you area.

    Keep an open mind on area...the area that I SWORE I would spend my career in...I found a new love that I want to spend my career in.

    You will hear rumors in school that you get to pick your hours, pick your pay, etc. I can tell you now that is not how the market is with nursing no matter where you live. Expect to start on the night shift and it can be a year or longer before a day shift comes available.

    There is NO NURSING SHORTAGE for new graduates. They are a dime a dozen...it's the experienced nurses (5 to 10 years of experience and longer) that the recruiters are after.


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