Salary - is it normal to work 60 plus hours a week?

  1. 0
    I have been an RN for 3 years in LTC and was promoted last year to a dual ADON /DCE position. I have survived a year, but I am completely burnt out! We got a new DON 3 months ago who is very good at delegating and very critical. Since I have the dual job role, I am given a lot of nursing admin tasks, on top of doing infection control, education, interviewing, hiring, orienting, write-ups (HR Functions). About a month ago, she said "we are going to take over scheduling. Now she says it is my job to do scheduling.

    The morning is filled with a lot of meetings, so it takes up about half the day. If i work an 8 hour day, that leaves me only 4 hours to get my work done. I work my butt off just to keep up. Most days I work 12 hours and still fall behind. If I don't get something done, she asks me why - I tell her I did my best - but she doesn't want to hear my "excuses."


    Labor day weekend is upon us and we have a call-out. Since I am on call for the 3rd weekend in a row I have to call and try to get someone to come in. I have been calling agency and still found no one. I guess there is no other choice but for me to do the 12 hour shift. But I worked 18 hours yesterday, and went in for 2 hours today to make the calls for nurses and do some paperwork for an upcoming orientation. I feel like crying, It should not fall all on me! Did I mention I am a divorced single parent to three daughters - 2 of which are in high school and do not drive. Did I also mention I have a 45 min to an hour drive to and from work.

    I am a very hard worker and I am pretty flexible, but this is getting to be quite unfair and I want to start looking for another position. But I wanted to know from any other nursing admin - is this normal working hours for a salaried position?
  2. 4,155 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 10 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    A few questions: what is a DCE? Director of clinical education? Depending on the size of your building, combining those 2 jobs might be doable. Talk to your DON....maybe she's clueless about the amount of work you have.Your commuting time and parenthood really have nothing to do with the job and everything to do with you. The facility is not responsible for either.
    amoLucia likes this.
  5. 0
    I am a new ADON at a personal care home. My DON is salary and makes sure she works 40 hrs a week. Is on call alot but has only come into work 4 times in a years time and not a full day either. And have i have been told not to call her when she is not oncall. I have been the ADON and have come in 3 times to pass meds and check on residents. I am hourly and have been in this position a little over one month. We are not skilled in anyway. We do have med techs and CNA's. I try to help the girls out when I can on the floor. I would suggest to keep your eyes out. But the grass is not always greener. Good luck.
  6. 0
    I was a nurse manager for several years. I tried very hard to keep to forty hours. It was difficult largely because of the nature of the work--there is always more to do.. I rarely went in to cover but I was always on call.
    looking back i think a lot of meetings are timewasters.. Weekly meetings can often be every other week..or you can attend them every other week
    There is always pressure in organizations to do more with less--and there are some who so more.. Can you delegate anything. Ie self scheduling.
    I don't think you should work more than 40 hours ..are there ways you can be more efficient?? They will likely expect the work to be done..
    Best wishes
  7. 0
    I am a DON in a smaller sized facility. My goal is to work 40 hours/week but usually run about 45 hours plus additional calls at home and occassionally I choose to bring some work home with me. I occassionally come back in during off hours, I participate in weekend rotation and I know I have to stay (or come in) whenever state walks into the building. That's part of the job and I get that.

    I have had 4 administrators in the past 2 years. The first 3 have had no problems with my schedule. The current boss keeps reminding me that I should be doing about 50-55 hours/week. I keep reminding him that although he was not the one who hired me, I clearly asked, before taking the position, how many hours were expected. I had turned down prior offers that routinely expected 50-65+ hours/week.
  8. 0
    I work between 45 and 50 hours in a regular week. My administrator barely puts in 40. The day he tells me I have to work longer hours is the day I'll be moving on.
  9. 2
    I am a DON in a smaller facility, don't have an ADON or MDS coordinator. I do it all and still have to cover the floor if I don't have a nurse. I do my best to keep my hours to 40-45 but many times it isn't possible. I feel that I get paid for 40 hours a week because I don't get paid extra if I work a shift on the floor. It's your choice to work that many hours so rethink your priorities. The damn work will be there tomorrow and the day after and the after. Take time for your family because they love and care for you - if your company is like mine you are just another warm body they have to pay to make their millions. Good Luck!
    amoLucia and Bella'sMyBaby like this.
  10. 0
    Quote from txwildflower57
    I am a DON in a smaller facility, don't have an ADON or MDS coordinator. I do it all and still have to cover the floor if I don't have a nurse. I do my best to keep my hours to 40-45 but many times it isn't possible. I feel that I get paid for 40 hours a week because I don't get paid extra if I work a shift on the floor. It's your choice to work that many hours so rethink your priorities. The damn work will be there tomorrow and the day after and the after. Take time for your family because they love and care for you - if your company is like mine you are just another warm body they have to pay to make their millions. Good Luck!
    Wow..no ADON or MDS? How many beds? What is average medicare census? That sounds crazy!
  11. 3
    What exactly is the DON doing while you're running yourself into the ground?

    She'll probably keep piling stuff on you until you draw a line.

    When all is said and done, you're just one person with only so much time and energy to go around. If your boss isn't being realistic about her expectations, you have to give her honest feedback and tell her when you've reached your limit. Why would she come to the aid of an employee who seems to have unlimited capacity to stretch herself ever thinner. If the wheel don't squeak, why grease it?

    Start keeping a log of how you spend your time, so you become truly aware of how long things actually take. It's easy to underestimate. Make notes of extenuating circumstances--interruptions, plans that had to be changed, shortfalls in staffing that took hours of your time to fill or that you ended up covering, etc. Until you become very familiar with your side of things, you won't be able to campaign effectively on your own behalf.

    Once you have information on how long things actually take (as opposed to how long they're supposed to take), prioritize. Block out the most important things on your weekly schedule. Then add the rest until you run out of room. After you have a time budget, ask your boss what she'd like to do about the rest. Maybe you need a clerical assistant. Maybe the DON needs to take on some of the tasks herself. Maybe there are things that can be condensed, delegated, reduced or eliminated.

    She can snit and snort and bluff and bluster all she wants, but the reality is that she can't get a gallon of milk from a two-quart pitcher. Until YOU are convinced of the constraints of a realistic time budget, she won't be either. She may not agree with you even if you can prove your case. But at least you will have taken care of yourself to the extent that you can.

    Get the most important things done first, in part, because that's just good sense, but also because it makes you more valuable. And let her know what didn't get covered. She's ultimately the one responsible, but she'll dump on you if you're the weakest link. Let increased awareness make you strong. You can only do what you can do. And you shouldn't be putting in 60 hours if it's supposed to be a forty-hour week (give or take 10%).

    I wish you the best!
  12. 1
    Miranda,

    I have tried to talk to her about this. She is arrogant and doesn't respect me (or most people) at all. She gets very upset and says she is "not going to talk about this now" and leaves the office. I tried to write down everything I do, but I only got to about the first 4 hours before I got busy and didn't have time to write things down. She did hire a very experienced nurse to be a floor supervisor -but this nurse goes in and changes things without telling anyone and actually causes more work and miscommunication.

    I had to work night shift again last night after working a full 9 hours, I drove the hour home and managed to get an hour of sleep before having to return. I am so over it - I would like to see her do the 9am med pass for the 38 residents and see what she has to say about it. This is why nurses leave the profession. To corp big wigs, we may be a "cost" to their bottom line...but without the nurses you have no business to give you a bottom line! 38 residents to 1 nurse is really pushing the limits!

    I found out that a job at a closer location might be available and yes I am actively looking for another job. I may not have made as much money as a floor nurse, but at least I could go home at about 8 hours, feel like I accomplished something (my shift/med pass), got overtime if I worked longer, and wasn't required to be "on call" when I got home.

    Thank you again for your input!
    Bella'sMyBaby likes this.


Top