New RN to work supervisor position at LTC facility

  1. 0
    I am a new graduate and work at a LTC facility, I have about a month of experience and work as a float throughout the whole place. I can finish almost any cart without staying over (which many nurses stay over to finish).

    What would be expected of me to work a supervisor position? We have ~120 beds and the new position has been open for months and on one fills it. is there a reason why? could I run into trouble being a new grad in a supervisor position?

    I nurse suggest that I could go for it so thats what gave me the idea... what do other people think.
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  4. 8 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    Go for it! I only had four months of experience when I became a full-time nursing supervisor, and I had a good response from my coworkers and (even better) an excellent response from the patients and their families. After about a year, though, I got tired of being responsible for everyone's lacksadaisical approach to work, so I took a different route.

    If you get to a point where you feel overwhelmed, or unable to safely do the work, don't be afraid to step down as supervisor - it's nothing to be ashamed of (we've had many experienced nurses give supervising a shot, and find out they just weren't comfortable with it).

    Good luck with whatever you decide!
  6. 1
    Many times that job involves medications administration and being in charge of the HHA's. The turn over is high, it just depends on the facility.
    aura_of_laura likes this.
  7. 0
    I was RN supervisor at a LTC facility. The job requirements were caring for a hall with 15-20patients many of whom did not need a lot of care. I also rounded on the other halls to make sure there were no problems. If there are any problems you are responsible, which included staffing. I had several days when my CNA did not show up so I was supervising and caring for 15-20patients. In the state I practice in there are a few skills that need to be performed by the RN such as the intitial assessment when a patient is admitted, drawing blood from a central line, or pushing IV medications. Occasionally there would be skills such as how do I work this pump, or can you start this IV. It was a change of pace from the hosptial but the pay was not there for the amount of stress in the job. Like some of the other posts said try it and if you don't like it you can go back on the floor. It is encouraging that you have worked all of the different floors and are comfortable. Best of luck.
  8. 4
    I think it's a terrible idea for a new grad to take on a supervisor position in LTC. Depending on shift, you may be the only RN in the buliding. It's not just about being able to complete a med pass or work the floor and get out on time, to me the most critical skill a supervisor needs to have is assessment. You will be the person running codes, you will be the one called when someone is on the floor, you will be the one called when someone is having a CVA, MI or is in respiratory distress. The dialysis patient's fistula starts pouring out arterial blood...you will be the one there making the life or death decisions.

    I'm not saying you are lacking assessment skills, but a new grad simply doesn't have the experience to have developed their assessment skills to their fullest capacity. I don't think any new grad has any business as a supervisor in LTC, and I really question the judegement of the DON of any facility that would put one in that position. I think a year of actue care experience is really a must before being a supervisor in LTC...or at least a few years in LTC.
  9. 2
    "It's not just about being able to complete a med pass or work the floor and get out on time, to me the most critical skill a supervisor needs to have is assessment. You will be the person running codes, you will be the one called when someone is on the floor, you will be the one called when someone is having a CVA, MI or is in respiratory distress. The dialysis patient's fistula starts pouring out arterial blood...you will be the one there making the life or death decisions."

    I agree that some recent grads don't have the critical thinking, assessment skills intact to be able to take on this type of responsibility. BUT I am a recent grad, (May 2010) and have also worked pre hospital for 13 years with an ALS service and did a one year externship in the ER while in school. I AM the person who responds to the acute, ST elevation MI, the unresponsive CVA with agonal respirations, the multivictim trauma patients you have to triage quickly and starting treating in the DARK, with 3 feet of snow at 2am, I AM the one who is starting an IV, watching the monitor as your PVC's are turning into bigeminies, keeping your airway patent and talking to the hospital via radio giving them my head to toe assessment while keeping myself upright in the back of an ambulance going lights and sirens to the hospital.

    So, yes, some recent grads are not ready for this kind of responsibility right out of school. But being a "recent grad" doesn't always mean one isn't knowledgeable, experienced, and able to differentiate between normal mental status change in a pt with dementia or something serious as a subdural bleed.

    I too just got offered a supervisor postition in a LTC facility. Do I want the responsibility? Don't know. Am I educated, experienced, able to think critically to run, respond, and stabilize a medical emergency or run a code? ABSOLUTLY!
    jeemac and Nurses-Rule1987 like this.
  10. 0
    2 weeks ago I began orientation in a LTC/sub-acute facility. When I began orientation, I was under the impression that I would be training as a staff nurse. This is my 3rd week and I just found out that they will be training me as a Supervisor. Just to add a little background, I'm fresh out of nursing school. Just graduated in May. And while my initial thoughts were "Wow.. I'm in way over my head", I've come to realize that although I'm a new grad, it doesn't mean I have nothing to offer this facility.

    Now I'm remembering all those things I learned in leadership class. Last night during my orientation, the Supervisor I was with told me "You worked your ass off for 4 years for that license. One day you might find that everyone in this building is working under your license. Protect it. You are capable of doing everyone elses' job... but can they do your job?"

    This is a huge responsibility, but I'm looking at this as an opportunity to become a leader.
  11. 0
    jeemac, how are you doing now...I hope well
  12. 0
    I think you need to do a self-assessment first. See where you are with your supervisory skills, assessment skills, and more importantly, what are your resources going to be? In a good LTC like I believe my facility is, the LPN's are *MORE* than capable of doing comprehensive assessments, stopping arterial blood, noticing a CVA/MI symptom, etc. Yes, you are RN and responsible, but you need to know who your team is, how experienced they are, and what resources you will have when on the job. It's scary, yes. You need experience, yes, but with the right team, coaches, and mentors you will do great.


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