lpn as ADON?

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    Lpn as ADON? Just wondering how that works. Are they in charge when the DON is gone? That doesn't make sense because legally a lpn can't supervise Rns. Just wondering how a lpn can get by with doing resident admissions, intial assessments when that is an rn role.
  2. 51 Comments so far...

  3. 1
    In my state it is perfectly legal for an LPN to do admissions and initial assessments. It is also completely legal for an LPN to supervise an RN in an administrative role (although not necessarily a clinical role).

    Yes, the ADON is in charge when the DON is not available, and I personally believe that would require an RN. I have seen some facilities use an LPN, but not really a good idea.
    Sparrowhawk likes this.
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    Flame away...I would not let an LPN supervise me in any way...clinical or otherwise. I've never worked in a building with an LPN as an ADON and I can't imagine hiring an LPN to be an ADON. That said, I know some very smart LPNs and I would let them take care of me as a patient. The rest is not in their scope of practice.
    achot chavi, DixieRedHead, deleern, and 5 others like this.
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    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    Flame away...I would not let an LPN supervise me in any way...clinical or otherwise. I've never worked in a building with an LPN as an ADON and I can't imagine hiring an LPN to be an ADON. That said, I know some very smart LPNs and I would let them take care of me as a patient. The rest is not in their scope of practice.
    Agree. When I first read of LPNs being in charge at some LTC facilities, my thoughts were similar. Beyond the LPN scope of practice and taking advantage of the LPN in order to get around paying the person who has the appropriate license. Administration in any facility belongs at least in the RN role. Next, they will be having those CNA medication aides running the show to save even more money.
    bossynurse101 and Moogie like this.
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    Our state regs specifically say that an LPN can not supervise anyone. THey also can not perform assessments but, can only make observations.
  7. 0
    Quote from noc4senuf
    Our state regs specifically say that an LPN can not supervise anyone. THey also can not perform assessments but, can only make observations.
    Yeah. That's the whole idea for retaining the difference between RNs and LPNs, and paying LPNs less money.
  8. 2
    It has less to do with money and more with scope of practice and education received.
    debRN0417 and noc4senuf like this.
  9. 0
    What about LPN's as unit managers? I have a problem as an RN floating to other units, and having the LPN unit manager nagging me about doing certain things...
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    I worked in a place once that needed a supervisor. Management, I was 'only' the RN nurse manager of a busy subacute unit, decided to have the sup of the day taking the SDC, admissions nurse, and who ever else they decided. I said...Wait a minute, ladies...you have an LPN in the mix and she cannot supervise me. They quickly scraped the plan and hired a regular day sup. Again no offense meant to any LPN...I know some very smart ones but the regs are the regs.
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    Yeah, I don't know how a facility can get around having an lpn in charge of rn. In many states I know it is out of the lpn scope of practice. Is it something that the DON is able to co sign them on? If it isn't out of their scope of practice then what is the difference between an rn and lpn in that state?


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