How did YOU make YOUR transition from Floor nursing to Administrative nursing?? - page 2

by MiaRNoffduty 7,492 Views | 15 Comments

Just wanted to know the various ways you lovely Nurses have made the smooth transition from an experienced floor nurse to an ADON/DON or Administrator of Nursing or any administration position?? What position did you have before... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Racklebrown
    Somehow, I have ended up being the floor nurse that all my administration counts on yet, haven't moved up the food chain. I understand that most management positions require an RN but, why do the higher up come to me every time something needs fixed? I am always told what an important "go-to" nurse I am. I have taken all the responsibility of running the shift. When anything comes up, I am asked to leave my patients,floor and even building to clean up messes elsewhere. Also of course, while finishing my own work. I always get it done or at least the fire put out so that it can be followed up on. Is that my mistake?


    I was offered an interim unit manager position by my last DON. He let me know that he would like me to take the position permanently but cooperate policy stated it was an RN only slot. I am starting back to school but would like to know what I can do now. Is it just a matter of being better at the politics involved?

    Well I'm not sure. Have you spoken to a trusted management person about this before? Is there someone in management you get along with well and you feel you could ask honest input from? Are you able to take the constructive criticisim - are you sure? (If that person thinks you can't they may not be completely honest). Also I think the future in LTC leans more to having RN management in the past then they did before. I went a long way for a long time as an LPN manager, but those days may be over.
  2. 0
    Speaking from an administrative point of view there ARE things that you can do.
    1. Enjoy the respect that you are given for your expertise and knowledge.

    2. When you are sent to other places and it's going to take a significant amount of time, ask to have someone called in, or to take over your part of the work for that time. LTC is much more acute and your residents deserve the attention they need.

    3. When it's time for your evaluation, ASK FOR MORE MONEY!! and give the reason why.
  3. 0
    Hi SuesquatchRN,

    I also came from a managerial/administrative background prior to obtaining my RN. And I also find floor nursing a very tough adjustment.

    Right now I am working in a skilled nursing - Medicare unit. The patient load is about 16 patients and the paperwork is tedious.

    In making my transition to administrative nursing, what do you suggest the first step be? I am still fairly new and learning.

    Also, what nursing jobs are not floor nursing jobs?

    Thank you,

    Lori
  4. 0
    Quote from Loricisco
    Hi SuesquatchRN,

    I also came from a managerial/administrative background prior to obtaining my RN. And I also find floor nursing a very tough adjustment.

    Right now I am working in a skilled nursing - Medicare unit. The patient load is about 16 patients and the paperwork is tedious.

    In making my transition to administrative nursing, what do you suggest the first step be? I am still fairly new and learning.

    Also, what nursing jobs are not floor nursing jobs?

    Thank you,

    Lori
    You first have to master floor nursing. New nurses do not have the experience to be managers and all the staff know it. They will eat you alive if you try to make them do what you yourself never mastered.
  5. 0
    Got Associates in '08, LPN in '09, RN in '12. Floor nurse '09, Charge Nurse in '10, ADON in '11, DON in '13. Most of my prior experience came from managing a sports-authority type store and then a local bank for 5 years. Fell into nursing, moved up quick, and I love every minute of it. Almost. ;-) I'm ready to go back to get my BSN but I'm still trying to learn what my options are and I have too many loans still...
  6. 0
    RN in '04. 2 years med surg charge, 3 years LTC supervisor and MDS nurse. One year LTC unit manager, then 2 years as MDS department head and team chair. Hated that. Meetings all the time. Now I am a unit manager on a 40 bed unit with half long term and half short term Med A. I like managing, but I still answer bells, run lifts, toilet residents on top of the paper work and discharge planning. What helped me was getting on committees for care plan revisions, QA, and taking side projects. Get your name noticed by being involved in changes.


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