bird aviary

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    My facility is looking into a bird aviary for our residents. Actually a staff member was able to purchase a nice one for dirt cheap at an auction. I am concerened with how these have worked for other facilities that have or have had them? Honestly my main concern is compliance with state regulations and running into trouble there. I understand we have to have policies in place and can only have certain birds, we have to have a cleaning schedule...etc. Can any one offer any guidance in this area? Will these be beneficial for the residents or will it simply be nice for a month or so and then just sit in the corner?
    Thanks for your input.
  2. 10 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    In Richmond, VA, there is a Rehab facility that one was built into the wall, it only had small birds parakeets and finchs. My grandmother as well as the other residents loved to be wheeled up to watch them. Not sure of laws tho. Hope this helps :spin:
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    Not the same with the infection control issues, but we had a fish tank for a while. Nice to look at and had a calming effect, but when the person that took care of them left...no one wanted to care for the fish.
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    Birds are some of the germiest,nastiest creatures on the planet. Think at least twice before you get any. Clean up is a chore and what are you going to do if one gets out and starts to fly around the facility?
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    We have two birds , a parakeet and a Cockatiel, in two separate cages . I personally hate them but the residents and visitors love them. One wolf whistles when people walk by the cage. They have never gotten out of the cage. A local vet voluntarily manages any issues we have with the birds and the cat (who live in a courtyard). We also have two large fish tanks which a volunteer cleans and provides the fish. The last building I visited with a large aviary was using it for arts and crafts displays and not birds. Maybe you could get a small bird cage first to see how it works and what problems you have with scheduling cleaning etc. Sometimes you can find someone who will donate a bird and a cage.
  7. 0
    Thanks for all the great input. It definitely gives me more to think about.
  8. 1
    My facility currently has a Large aviary in our sitting room, we have about 10 finch of all colors an my residents loves it!
    They sit and watch the birds for hours.
    We have a company who comes in once a month an thoroughly cleans it inside and out and also changes out the birds for us.
    adnil65 likes this.
  9. 2
    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    Birds are some of the germiest,nastiest creatures on the planet. Think at least twice before you get any. Clean up is a chore and what are you going to do if one gets out and starts to fly around the facility?
    I am sorry but this is not accurate and birds are very beneficial for elderly patients to look at and change their view from everyday pains, medications and dificulties
    NurseNanu and Sparrowhawk like this.
  10. 0
    Birds are indeed lovely, but do some research. I had a bird feeder in my yard and a bird bath and ALL the books I read warned about psticosis and mites and other nasty things one could catch from touching bird feathers and bird poop.
  11. 0
    I agree, wild birds can harbor some disease, but the domestic ones need health certificates just like cats & dogs.


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