Is it worth going the LVN route to get into the RN programs faster?

  1. 0
    I live in the Los Angeles area and I know it takes forever to get into the RN programs, is it worth going the LVN route to get in faster? I ask because I feel like going that route I won't have to deal with the lottery system or any wait lists but i'm unsure because at the same time I feel like it may be a waste of time and money, it doesn't really make things faster since I still have to do my pre-reqs but would be a faster way into the actual RN program once I complete all the pre-reqs. What do you think?
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  3. 12 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    That's a difficult question to answer, and depends on many variables like geographical location, current job market, financial situation, family support and whether you are relying on working as an LPN during RN school.

    I think the LPN route is best done only if it is a reputable, respected program with a low cost and guaranteed to count as credit at whatever RN programs you wish to enter. For instance, my LPN program cost 4k, counted as half my RN education at the local community college, and enabled me entry into a fast-track program (it's a 2 year wait for a regular RN program here). It worked for me, but under different circumstances, it may not work for others. I know a girl who paid 25k for her LPN program, and because of accreditation issues, she was unable to find an RN program to accept her credits, meaning she had to start at the beginning, as well as being out 25k.

    I think these are questions you should write down, then take to individual schools of your choice and ask them while meeting with academic advisors. Every school is different, and it would be most beneficial to hear it from them rather than speculate with forum users who aren't certain about the exact nature of your situation.

    Good luck!
    pattylee1122 likes this.
  5. 0
    it depends on the individual....i went to a private LPN school....cost me about 8,000 and when i finished...i quickly started working on my prereq for the RN b/c i knew no college will accept the credits from th eLPN program...but the main thing was I was able to jump into the second yr of the RN program through a bridge course at the community college(when i had finished all the prereq and took a transition exam)...and i was able to make money as an LPN while going to school which took a lot of stress off......

    so like i said eval your situation and see
  6. 0
    My daughter get her LVN 2004 and still looking for job, she is looking for close evening college to go and get her RN. there is no community college to offer evening courses for working adult, only private college offer courses, and if you don't have financial support forget it. be smart and wait for straight go to RN program and don't waste your time and money.


    Quote from naly.sayavong
    I live in the Los Angeles area and I know it takes forever to get into the RN programs, is it worth going the LVN route to get in faster? I ask because I feel like going that route I won't have to deal with the lottery system or any wait lists but i'm unsure because at the same time I feel like it may be a waste of time and money, it doesn't really make things faster since I still have to do my pre-reqs but would be a faster way into the actual RN program once I complete all the pre-reqs. What do you think?
  7. 0
    Quote from naly.sayavong
    I live in the Los Angeles area and I know it takes forever to get into the RN programs, is it worth going the LVN route to get in faster? I ask because I feel like going that route I won't have to deal with the lottery system or any wait lists but i'm unsure because at the same time I feel like it may be a waste of time and money, it doesn't really make things faster since I still have to do my pre-reqs but would be a faster way into the actual RN program once I complete all the pre-reqs. What do you think?
    It may or not may be faster. Some bridge programs require you have LVN work experience before you can apply. Citrus College is one that I know that requires at least one year of LVN work experience. Also, not all bridge programs will necessarily bypass a lottery/waitlist system. I know Mt SAC's bridge program is a waitlist, although I do believe they are changing their regular ADN program from waitlist to points based. I don't know if the same will apply to the bridge program.

    I took the LVN to ADN route because I too did not have any pre-requisites completed when I decided to go into nursing. I figured that these were my options if everything worked out as expected:

    1) take my pre-reqs for a year, do an ADN program program for 2 years, do an RN-BSN program for a year (4 years to BSN, 1 year of RN work experience)

    2) take an LVN program for a year, work as an LVN while I take my pre-reqs for a year, do an ADN bridge program for a year, do an RN-BSN program for a year (4 years to BSN, 2 years LVN experience, 1 year RN experience)

    3) take pre-reqs for a year, do an accelerated BSN program for 2 years (3 yrs to BSN, but still only 1 year RN experience after 4 years)

    All 3 options would take the same amount of time for me to have a BSN with one year of RN experience under my belt. I chose going option 2 because it allowed me to be able to work in the field faster (as an LVN) and I could work and pay my way through each step, unlike the aBSN route, which would require me to take out student loans. Right now I'm on track as planned and currently attending an LVN-ADN bridge program, expecting to graduate in late May.

    Of course there are a lot of other factors too that allowed me to go with this route. For example, I was able to get into a competitive adult school for my LVN, which allowed me to be able to pay for it out of pocket. I was able to get pre-reqs on schedule because I already had some sort of priority in registration from having taken my GEs for my BA from my CC. I had connections that pretty much guaranteed that I was going to have some sort of LVN job after graduation.

    In a nutshell, it really depends on your specific situation on whether or not going the LVN to RN route would be faster/better for you. You need to do some more research on the LVN and RN programs that you're interested in.
  8. 0
    I exited as an LPN because of financial reasons.... when I did go back for my RN my LPN experience was very helpful!!! I could focus on learning more because the basics didnt intimidate me
  9. 2
    I am an LPN and I recently finished my ADN. I found that getting my LPN first was the best decision for several reasons.
    1) I doubled my income once I became an LPN ( it only took me one year)
    2) I got into an RN program right away and continued to work while I went to school .. (I have a family to support)
    3) Now I am at the point where I am looking for an RN position I have realized that I am not considered to be a new grad because I have 2 years LPN experience (some hospitals will consider me a new grad). So getting a job will be a tad easier than if I was not an experienced LPN.
    4) RN school was MUCH easier than LPN school because I was able to apply my experience as an LPN to my RN studies.

    From start to finish it has taken me 4 years to get my ADN, including breaks (I started my RN almost a year after graduating from PN).
    Financially there is no way I would have been able to get my nursing degree if I had not got my LPN first.
    Pink Rabbit and pattylee1122 like this.
  10. 0
    Quote from tainted1972
    I am an LPN and I recently finished my ADN. I found that getting my LPN first was the best decision for several reasons.
    1) I doubled my income once I became an LPN ( it only took me one year)
    2) I got into an RN program right away and continued to work while I went to school .. (I have a family to support)
    3) Now I am at the point where I am looking for an RN position I have realized that I am not considered to be a new grad because I have 2 years LPN experience (some hospitals will consider me a new grad). So getting a job will be a tad easier than if I was not an experienced LPN.
    4) RN school was MUCH easier than LPN school because I was able to apply my experience as an LPN to my RN studies.

    From start to finish it has taken me 4 years to get my ADN, including breaks (I started my RN almost a year after graduating from PN).
    Financially there is no way I would have been able to get my nursing degree if I had not got my LPN first.
    what school did you attend to get your ADN?
  11. 0
    For me it was. I started the LVN program at my community college in August 2010. I applied and was accepted Dec. 2009. I graduated Dec 2011, and was accepted into the RN program at the same college and would be starting in the 2nd semester instead of the first for Spring 2013. I have a year of nursing experience under my belt now and most of my classmates applied for the RN program at the same time I started my LVN program. So I would have started the RN program pretty much the same time as I did now, but I would have had no nursing experience under my belt and would have had to wait tables for 2 more years. To me, it was VERY worth it.
  12. 0
    For me yes
    I had 0 collage, and didn't want to do tons of pre-recs and the realize I hated nursing.
    Started 2008
    Graduated LPN 2009
    2010-2012 pre-reca
    2013 starts RN 2014 graduate hopeful w RN


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