Un-necessary classes

  1. I have had to take some of the most unecessary classes for my degree...we have to take classes in "clusters", such as a Humanistic Appreciation, Cultural Diversity, and so on....
    For instance, what does a pottery class have to do with nursing? Nothing, but I had to take it to fullfill a cluster...
    or, an Anthropology class? Nothing, but I had to take that too.
    What is the reason for this nonsense? Do any of you have to do the same?
    I realize that it is supposed to make us more "well rounded", but does it really? or does it simply help the school get more money?:chuckle

    But I guess I will do what it takes to get to my degree... How 'bout ya'll?
    What do you think about it?
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  2. 43 Comments

  3. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from Julielpn
    I have had to take some of the most unecessary classes for my degree...we have to take classes in "clusters", such as a Humanistic Appreciation, Cultural Diversity, and so on....
    For instance, what does a pottery class have to do with nursing? Nothing, but I had to take it to fullfill a cluster...
    or, an Anthropology class? Nothing, but I had to take that too.
    What is the reason for this nonsense? Do any of you have to do the same?
    I realize that it is supposed to make us more "well rounded", but does it really? or does it simply help the school get more money?:chuckle

    But I guess I will do what it takes to get to my degree... How 'bout ya'll?
    What do you think about it?
    We has a similar thread not too long ago, that didn't go too well.

    Anyhow, I agree that there are some classes that seem worthless for your degree. Like my favorite (art appreciation). I have no care whatsoever for it but I need it.

    I just go with the flow

    I have no problem with all the sciences they wish to give me. I love them
  4. by   llg
    It's the difference between being a "well-educated person" who can adapt to a changing reality and being a technician who has been trained to perform specific skills but can't go beyond what they have been directly taught.

    A truly well-educated person has a broad understand of the world and how it works -- and has experienced and studied that world from a wide variety of perspectives. If you choose to have a positive attitude about those classes and learn everything that you can from them, they can help broaden your understanding of the world in which you and your future patients live.

    For example, that pottery class could have taught you about design, the art of crafting something, and the creative process in general, the ability of art to bring relaxation and pleasure into life, etc. if you had let it. Understanding the role of art in a healthy lifestyle and the benefits of participating in an artistic form of self expression could be of use to your patients. That understanding might also help you become more artful in your practice in many different ways.

    That's just one example.

    We need more nurses with a broad understanding of the world, its people, and the many complex processes that comprise human existence. Properly practiced, nursing can be much more than the mere performance of a few technical skills. The developers of your curriculum know that and are trying to expand your mind by exposing you to a wide variety of perspectives in an attempt to expand your perceptions of the world and thought processes. Whether you choose to take full advantage of those opportunities, learn all that you can, and use that new knowledge to become a better person and a better nurse is up to you.

    I've been a nurse for over 25 years now. Some of my best ideas for nursing come through the exploration of material outside the nursing domain -- within areas totally outside the health care sphere.

    Good luck.
    llg
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I had to take a computer basics class, that taught people how to use Microsoft Office. I have over 4 years experience with MO, yet still had to take it. No way to test out of it.

    I understand the reasoning for it, however, i'm paying for a class to teach me something i already know!
  6. by   GPatty
    Quote from llg

    For example, that pottery class could have taught you about design, the art of crafting something, and the creative process in general, the ability of art to bring relaxation and pleasure into life, etc. if you had let it. Understanding the role of art in a healthy lifestyle and the benefits of participating in an artistic form of self expression could be of use to your patients. That understanding might also help you become more artful in your practice in many different ways.
    Thank you! What a lovely way to put things into perspective...nice relpy to the thread, and I appreciate it.

    I had to giggle at the piece of your response above, though, cause although I thoroughly enjoyed making the pottery, I was not very adept at it, :chuckle and I hardly think that the grief I caused to that poor clay was anything resembling a creative process...

    Jess~ I hope I don't open some can of worms here, and I agree with you too..I just go with the flow.
    I simply was wondering how many other schools have students take classes that don't seem pertinent to the degree they are seeking is all.
  7. by   Tweety
    Excellent answer (as always) llg!

    I'm in RN to BSN, so currently I'm talking the co-req Western Civ. The course is very hard and I'm going to loose my 4.0, as are a lot of us, mainly because the tests ask 50 very trivial questions. It has people screaming "what does this have to do with nursing anyway". The last and final class I'll be taking as a coreq is World Religions.
  8. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Everything i would try to make on that stupid wheel would collapse.

    I made a lot of plates on that wheel.
  9. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I think a religions class would be handy.
  10. by   GPatty
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Everything i would try to make on that stupid wheel would collapse.

    I made a lot of plates on that wheel.
    I can SOOOO relate to that one!
  11. by   wtbcrna
    I think we all had to take quite a few classes that didn't directly apply to our major. But you might be like me and find one of those humanity classes that is to your liking and continue using all your electives in that field.... I took 27 credit hours in history while obtaining my BSN.....they don't apply directly to my nursing but I enjoyed taking them and I think it gives me a much better background to talk with my older patients..
  12. by   Katnip
    Every degree requires a core curriculum that is usually unrelated to your major, whether it's math, business, art, or nursing. It's what separates a degree from a technical or vocational program.

    Personally, I liked taking classes that were unrelated to nursing. It opened a whole new world of possibilities to me, and I learned a lot about the world and myself because of them. Though, like Tweety, I took one class that nearly pulled my GPA down.

    I took an art class once. The "sculpture" I made turned out to be a blob of clay. I titled it "Chaos of a Modern World." I got a B+ on it.:chuckle

    ~Kat
  13. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    I had to take a computer basics class, that taught people how to use Microsoft Office. I have over 4 years experience with MO, yet still had to take it. No way to test out of it.

    I understand the reasoning for it, however, i'm paying for a class to teach me something i already know!
    I have a MO certificate and training, and still had to take that class. There is nothing they taught me I did not know already.
  14. by   Lisa CCU RN
    I don't know, but I'd think a bachelor degree would suggest you had a more well rounded education and an associate's would say you had just received the basics of a particular field or subject, hence the more numerous credit hours received.

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