Telling instructors that you are already an LVN...?

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    I am a newish LVN (working for a year) and I have just begun the transition program at my school where you start in the second level of the RN program. I didn't mind if my classmates knew that I was an LVN but I was kind of hoping that my instructors could be 'kept in the dark' in that aspect. However, my clinical instructor specifically asked each of us to fill out a 'Student Profile' detailing our healthcare experience so I had to let them know I was already an LVN. I feel confident in my skills in some aspects but not so much in others (for instance I work in LTC and do not have the same skills required for Med/Surg, where we will be spending the vast majority of our clinical hours). Has anyone dealt with being treated differently or had more expected of them from their instructor because they were an LVN? I guess I am just scared that I will look like an idiot or be expected to know something and not know it. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
  2. 14 Comments so far...

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    Quote from texaslvn12
    I am a newish LVN (working for a year) and I have just begun the transition program at my school where you start in the second level of the RN program. I didn't mind if my classmates knew that I was an LVN but I was kind of hoping that my instructors could be 'kept in the dark' in that aspect. However, my clinical instructor specifically asked each of us to fill out a 'Student Profile' detailing our healthcare experience so I had to let them know I was already an LVN. I feel confident in my skills in some aspects but not so much in others (for instance I work in LTC and do not have the same skills required for Med/Surg, where we will be spending the vast majority of our clinical hours). Has anyone dealt with being treated differently or had more expected of them from their instructor because they were an LVN? I guess I am just scared that I will look like an idiot or be expected to know something and not know it. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
    Hi there a little bit of backround about myself-

    I got my LPN license in 2009 and have been working full time at clinic. I worked on my pre-reqs and was accepted into a bridge program in Fall 2011. I just graduated this past December 2012. Ill be taking the boards in a week, eeek!

    Anyway to answer your question for our Mobility/LPN to RN bridge program we started at about level 2 of the traditional ADN program. However, our group of all LPNs (there were about 18 of us-we lost 2 over the summer-they failed the theory portion, but did great in clinical) anyway we were in a cohort all together and then after we played catch up over the summer (we had class, the regular 2 yr students didnt) we merged with their class of about 40 for our fall and final semester. And being mixed in with the traditional students our nursing instructors did expect more of us and kind of partnered us kind of with a buddy or be a mentor to the traditional students. But it wasnt too bad, there was some stuff we were unfamiliar with; especially because our clincals were all med/surg. And well the majority of us all worked in clinics mostly and a few at the hospital and LTC. So those of us at the clinic were completely new to the "assessments", while the hospital LPNs were more comfortable with the assessments and IV skills. I hope that helps.
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    Quote from texaslvn12
    I am a newish LVN (working for a year) and I have just begun the transition program at my school where you start in the second level of the RN program. I didn't mind if my classmates knew that I was an LVN but I was kind of hoping that my instructors could be 'kept in the dark' in that aspect. However, my clinical instructor specifically asked each of us to fill out a 'Student Profile' detailing our healthcare experience so I had to let them know I was already an LVN. I feel confident in my skills in some aspects but not so much in others (for instance I work in LTC and do not have the same skills required for Med/Surg, where we will be spending the vast majority of our clinical hours). Has anyone dealt with being treated differently or had more expected of them from their instructor because they were an LVN? I guess I am just scared that I will look like an idiot or be expected to know something and not know it. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
    I'm basically in the same boat. I recently moved from WV to VA and it was the perfect timing to complete my ADN. I was previously taking the pre-req's at a branch of WVU. I'm not in a bridge program at all, lucky for me all my pre-req's did transfer. I didn't shout out that I'm a LPN in WV (have been for 8.5 years) there is about 3 of us in the program and of course the director knows. I'm know that my clinical skills will help me. My biggest fear is what if they ask me a question and I get it wrong. I don't want others to think I'm a poor nurse.
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    I was in a program that actually was pro LPN. I was in an accelerated portion, where there were people who worked in healthcare, I was the only LPN in the class; there were Surgical techs, a respiratory therapist, a doula as well. Since there is a clinical profile, and the information is revealed, I reminded people "I'm in the program as a student nurse as well, I'm here to learn just the same", so It went well. There were instructors that asked me to help with people who needed help, or take a more complex pt and learn the ropes, and I am grateful for that.
    jddm163 likes this.
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    I'm a 2nd semester RN student. Nobody knows I was a Navy Corpsman for several years. I chose not to disclose this because I do not want other students or instructors to expect more from me than other students. There are some LPN's in my class that made it known and the instructors tend to me more strict on them with checkoffs and such.
    makingstrides likes this.
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    I have been an LN for three years, and I am proficient at what I do. I feel that being an LPN while in RN school is both a help, and a hindrance. One plus is that clinical instructors often give you more complex cases, and they let you do more adavanced skills at clinical. Also sometimes your former education can give you insight when learning new concepts; but because you are an LPN some teachers will skip information, because they think you already know things.Also I have ran into a few instructors that look down on healthcare professionals that don't have degrees (like LPNs and M.A.s), and these instructors can make condescending remarks, and they make the classroom uncomfortable.
    jddm163 likes this.
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    We are supposed to put on the "student nurse" role when in school/clinicals anyway so it shouldn't matter much. I understand your worry about not knowing something that someone may think that you should. The thing is not all LPNs are practicing and they don't all do the same job. If you are not doing bedside nursing your skills are probably not going to be as sharp as someone who is. Not all LPNs work bedside and this should be known, especially by instructors. So it will hopefully not be so stressful.
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    Thanks for the replies all, I have been in clinicals for about three weeks and I have had a good experience so far. I was mainly nervous because I work in LTC and we got a short med/surg clinical in my LVN program so I was afraid I would look incompetent despite having a license as a nurse. However, I am actually bored at clinicals only having one patient and have requested to have two, even if the rest of the class isn't there yet. My teacher knows I am an LVN and so far has not expected more of me. Next week we check off on IVs and while we did this in my LVN program, we got very little experience doing them in clinicals and I have next to none at my job. I am slightly nervous about doing IVP meds, but I explained to my instructor and she was very understanding.
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    GREAT!!!! Thanks for the update....see??? It's not bad at all...
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    I was an LPN while in my RN program back in *gulp 1978.
    During our psych clinicals, held on day shift, we wore out uniforms (including caps!!), were not allowed to give meds or let the patients on and off the unit (it was a locked unit).
    At 3pm, clinicals ended - I changed into street clothes and became the 3-11p charge nurse. The poor patients were beyond confused.

    Good times!


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