Summer LPN Course?

  1. I need some advice! I am a first year nursing student at a Community College (quarter system). The college offers a summer LPN course as "optional" for students continuing on to become RN's. The course is 7 weeks and instructors "encourage" students to take the course. I haven't gotten a straight answer as to why it is "encouraged" other than: 1.) it will give us prep. for taking the NCLEX boards - because we will be taking the LPN boards 2.) we can work as an LPN while obtaining our ADN degree 3.) it is a "back-up" plan in case we don't finish the second year of the two year nursing program (? ).

    My dilema:
    1.) I don't have financial aid, and would have to pay for the summer quarter out-of-pocket. 2.) I have another course that I need to take before I can apply to a BSN program that I planned on taking the same summer quarter (can't take concurrently with the LPN course due to the workload).

    For those of you that may have completed a LPN course while working towards your RN, has it been very helpful to you? Will I be behind if I don't take the course? Please help!!
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   luv4nursing
    Are you sure its not a CNA class? LPN schooling is normally at least 12 months.
    But I wanted to say I did get my LPN and I worked as an LPN for a year while I completed my pre reqs for RN school. I will start the bridge program in January to become an RN and it will take me an a year to finish.

    Yes it was very helpful to me, because I was able to be financially self sufficient for the first time in my life. I am glad I did it. But no, you wont be behind bc they will teach u everything u need to know in school. good luck to ya!
  4. by   littlebitasunshine
    Quote from luv4nursing
    Are you sure its not a CNA class? LPN schooling is normally at least 12 months.
    But I wanted to say I did get my LPN and I worked as an LPN for a year while I completed my pre reqs for RN school. I will start the bridge program in January to become an RN and it will take me an a year to finish.

    Yes it was very helpful to me, because I was able to be financially self sufficient for the first time in my life. I am glad I did it. But no, you wont be behind bc they will teach u everything u need to know in school. good luck to ya!
    Luv4nursing,
    Actually the summer courseis not a CNA class, rather it is a summer course offered after completing 1 year of a RN program. This makes sense with what you are saying with the LPN schooling being 12 months in duration. Thank you very much for the feedback!

    Has anyone seen anything similar? I want to make sure I am not missing out on something before I start the 2nd year of the ADN program.
  5. by   luv4nursing
    Quote from littlebitasunshine
    Luv4nursing,
    Actually the summer courseis not a CNA class, rather it is a summer course offered after completing 1 year of a RN program. This makes sense with what you are saying with the LPN schooling being 12 months in duration. Thank you very much for the feedback!

    Has anyone seen anything similar? I want to make sure I am not missing out on something before I start the 2nd year of the ADN program.

    OHHHHHHH, I GET IT! lol
    That does make sense. I would say go ahead and do it if you need to work, that would be the main reason. Having my LPN definitely came in handy. You can always do home health shifts on the side, its super easy and you have so much down time you can study while at work. I would probably go ahead and do it so you have it to fall back on in case you need to. Plus its good practice for the NCLEX. The NCLEX PN and NLCEX RN are very similar, the only difference being the RN included delegation. Once again, good luck!
  6. by   hikernurse
    I did the summer LPN program after my first year and found the experience very helpful. The class wasn't all that hard--it just tied together a few loose ends from our first year. Since I was working as a CNA anyway, I figured I might as well get a raise in pay by working as an LPN, right?

    What I didn't realize is that working as a LPN is substantially different from working as a CNA and even from clinicals. It's been kind of a steep learning curve, learning to manage my time and several patients on my own. That said, it has also been an invaluable experience. I'm glad I did it. A lot of lectures I have at school tie in with what I see at work and vice versa.

    If you're going to work anyway, go for it! And let us know what you end up deciding.
  7. by   Jules A
    Since you mentioned your financial situation as a consideration it might be a good idea to get your LPN that way you could work a bit at a decent wage while you are finishing your second year. Also the other things you mentioned like actually having something under your belt just in case is a good idea, imo.

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