LPN to RN...questions

  1. [font=book antiqua]hello! i am currently an lpn student, but will be graduating in june 07. i keeping going back and forth on making the decision to go right on for my rn. another 2-3 yrs of school just doesnt sound to apealing to me at the moment, but i know that i should just do it so i can get it over with while my children are small, and my husband can support us on his income. for those of you that were lpns before you got your rn....what was it like? what is the difference between the lpn and the rn school? does it go way more in depth? is it a lot harder? do i have an advantage going thru lpn school...is it any easier than people that have no experience? just some things that i have been wondering about. any feedback would be greatly appreciated. thanks!!!! btw...happy holidays everyone!!!!!!!!:spin:
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   dmarie (GA)
    Are there LPN-RN bridge programs near you? It's only an additional year (not 2-3 yrs.) of school. There are also LPN-RN bridge programs online. Indiana State and Excelsior are a couple that come to mind.
  4. by   traumaRUs
    I would definitely just stay in school. I was an LPN before I did the RN bridge program (3 semesters) and I am very glad that I did. I knew I wanted to work in a hospital and where I was living (NV, then IN, then IL), I knew that as an RN I would have more opportunities.

    I did go back to school later for more education, but I don't regret in the slightest staying in school for my RN - many more opportunities.
  5. by   Tweety
    Quote from dmarie (GA)
    Are there LPN-RN bridge programs near you? It's only an additional year (not 2-3 yrs.) of school. There are also LPN-RN bridge programs online. Indiana State and Excelsior are a couple that come to mind.
    Depends on the co-req courses the person has to take like Micro., Englishes, Psych., etc. that could be adding time on.

    To the OP: Just keep on keeping on. You won't regret it. Good luck!
  6. by   luv4nursing
    You could complete the pre reqs for the LPN to RN bridge program within 2 semesters, and Ive known ppl who did them during the summer (6 week courses)...its usually only a handful of classes. But it may come down to taking two sciences at the same time. Dont take Micro and A&P II at the same time. If u have to, take Micro and A&P I together since A&P I isnt too hard. Micro was the mother of all classes to me lol. Most of the non science classes can be taken online these days thru ur college. Then the transition program is normally a year long. Mine comes out to be 11 months.

    I would recommend if possible, that u try to get a couple of pre reqs out of the way before u even graduate LPN school....that is if u dont work already. Classes like English,Nutrition, Dev Psych, etc arent very hard and if u take them online u would only have to go on campus for exams(usually only a midterm and final). They dont require a lot of work from my experience. I would normally cram for the exams and did fine....they didnt require constant studying. I wish I had taken some classes while I was in LPN school so I could have gotten in the bridge program sooner. At least go ahead and sign up for a few summer classes....summer school is a lot of material in a short time, but I prefer to suffer for a short period of time and get it over with than drag it out for 3 or 4 months during the regular semester.

    Also, one of the best things to me about being an LPN while in RN school is u can work and make a decent living while u finish so it isnt that stressful. You could get a job in home health and get a lot of school work done while u are at work. Thats what I have done during my pre reqs Ill be doing it while I finish the RN bridge as well. Kills 2 birds with one stone!

    Good Luck! I would say if u want to go back do it as soon as possible....Ive met too many LPNs who kick themselves 10 or 15 years down the road for not getting their RN's sooner since they are mostly doing an RNs job for less pay. I know if I werent going back now (1 yr after I finished LPN school)....I may get complacent and not do it either. Once u get used to being out of school its hard to get motivated to go back.
  7. by   LadyNASDAQ
    Quote from djkmc1998
    [font=book antiqua]hello! i am currently an lpn student, but will be graduating in june 07. i keeping going back and forth on making the decision to go right on for my rn. another 2-3 yrs of school just doesnt sound to apealing to me at the moment, but i know that i should just do it so i can get it over with while my children are small, and my husband can support us on his income. for those of you that were lpns before you got your rn....what was it like? what is the difference between the lpn and the rn school? does it go way more in depth? is it a lot harder? do i have an advantage going thru lpn school...is it any easier than people that have no experience? just some things that i have been wondering about. any feedback would be greatly appreciated. thanks!!!! btw...happy holidays everyone!!!!!!!!:spin:
    i hear ya!!!

    years ago, there were tons of lpn jobs everywhere and especially in icu. yeppers, there as well!!! we were cheap and we just had the rn's push our meds and that was it lol.

    the hospitals started to phase out lpn's. i was told there was a planned layoff in time but i was privileged to be shown info about the university of ny at albany's program which later became regent's and now is called excelsior. i became a practical nurse in 1979 and a rn in 1984 so you see i was using my lpn in icu and telemetry but did have 1 year in med-surg first.

    in retrospect, you must, must,must not stop. you will see that as time prevails you will be a glorified nursing attendant. you were trained for more than that and yes, it is harder than lpn school but i found the boards a cinch because i knew most of the answers from my practical nursing program believe it or not!!!

    go back and do it now. you have internet access and we all can help you anytime you need it.

    all the best and remember, you can do it!!!!

    stacy
  8. by   djkmc1998
    wow...thank you for all of the responses....!!!!!!!!!! and such nice ones too! i think i will look more into a bridge program, that sounds so much better than going another 2-3 yrs. i love this website! i have found so much info and such nice helping people. thanks everyone!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :spin:
  9. by   AfloydRN
    I would absolutely recommend doing the RN program while your children are small. You will be able to provide for them better as they become " more expensive". There is a huge difference from LPN to RN wages where I work. The time will pass irregardless of what you do. Might as well better yourself.
  10. by   Teleflurry
    Quote from djkmc1998
    [font=book antiqua]hello! i am currently an lpn student, but will be graduating in june 07. i keeping going back and forth on making the decision to go right on for my rn. another 2-3 yrs of school just doesnt sound to apealing to me at the moment, but i know that i should just do it so i can get it over with while my children are small, and my husband can support us on his income. for those of you that were lpns before you got your rn....what was it like? what is the difference between the lpn and the rn school? does it go way more in depth? is it a lot harder? do i have an advantage going thru lpn school...is it any easier than people that have no experience? just some things that i have been wondering about. any feedback would be greatly appreciated. thanks!!!! btw...happy holidays everyone!!!!!!!!:spin:
    i am an lpn who is in an lpn to rn transition right now. it takes a year to complete. i know what you mean, with the idea of should i do it? yes! its not fair to do the same work as an rn minus a handful of things that we know and commonly do know how to do, and the pay difference. i asked myself...how different can it be. listen here...there is a difference. you get more involved in the care plan, nursing interventions, and deep into the physiology behind problems a patient can experience. dont stop o.k. keep going! i work on a telemetry unit, but had to fight and claw to be an lpn in the hospital. we're being phased out there. if you ever have dreams of working in acute care settings (ie hospitals, same day surgery, outpt services) do your rn. it won't hurt. i started my lpn when i was 15, graduated at 17, lpn at 18, and now im about to become an rn at 20-21ish depending on my graduation date. good luck!
    -teleflurry

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