Is LPN school less stressful and easier than RN school?

  1. 0
    Someone told me that all of the dropouts from RN school went to LPN because the work was a bit easier..is this true?

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  2. 16 Comments...

  3. 3
    It may be easier for an RN student to take an LPN course, but that is probably because they have learned part of it in even more detail. But, do not let LPN school fool you. Most programs are very intense...usually an 8 hour a day, 4-5 days per week, including clinicals. They are piling within a year a great deal of what RNs learn in two years (RNs have more theory and their classes are more intense) with no real break in between. You may get a holiday off, or maybe a week break at best, but it is crammed with pop quizzes, exams, clinical rotations with their own seperate assignments, performance of clinical skills, studying and cramming all the way. At least the RN program may sit out a semester, or have a summer break. LPN programs usually have no breaks.

    Bottom line is that if you wish to be a nurse on any level, you have to work REALLY HARD at it AND pass NCLEX. And, I'll tell you something-whether you believe it or not, the mental as well as the physical work a nurse does is even more stressful, because of the accountability and liability. You will begin to see why a nurse counts on good aides and ancillary staff, because ultimately, the nurse (especially the RN) is responsible for the outcomes of ALL of it.
  4. 0
    What are some tips to passing nursing school?
  5. 1
    Quote from Ms. Nurse Assistant
    What are some tips to passing nursing school?
    Study your buns off, time management and not being distracted by friends, family and social situations. Also, do not argue with the professors, because you have to look at it like they are right, whether you really disagree or not.
    Jules A likes this.
  6. 1
    Quote from Ms. Nurse Assistant
    What are some tips to passing nursing school?
    I think they are equal when it comes to stress and difficulty with the main difference being the depth at which you cover any subject. I really found that in LPN school I was simply taught to do a thing, and anything past that (e.g., "Why am I doing this?") was only minimally covered if at all. In RN school though, you really dig into what you are doing and more specifically WHY! A lot more disease process teaching going on in RN school too. I have been an LPN for almost 7 years. I started BSN school here in Seattle, but I found that I didn't want to pursue a second bachelor's and then my master's in nursing because it would take 4 years to do that when I am eligible to pursue a master's as a physcian's assistant and it will only take 2 years. I always encourage someone thinking about pursuing nursing as a career to really go for it and aim for their BSN. I realize there are many reasons a person may not be able to devote themselves to the four year committment ... but, really, so many more doors are open to you if you go that far ... even more if you go for an advanced degreee. I think the most important part of being successful in any degree program is FOCUS & TIME MANAGEMENT! If i failed at either something always suffered (grades, lack of sleep, etc.). It is really important to be able to say, "NO!" ... when it comes to family and friend or what have you because you have something to get done for school. If you can stay focused and manage your time well then you'll have half the battle won!

    Best of Luck,
    c.
    amjowens likes this.
  7. 1
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    It may be easier for an RN student to take an LPN course, but that is probably because they have learned part of it in even more detail. But, do not let LPN school fool you. Most programs are very intense...usually an 8 hour a day, 4-5 days per week, including clinicals. They are piling within a year a great deal of what RNs learn in two years (RNs have more theory and their classes are more intense) with no real break in between. You may get a holiday off, or maybe a week break at best, but it is crammed with pop quizzes, exams, clinical rotations with their own seperate assignments, performance of clinical skills, studying and cramming all the way. At least the RN program may sit out a semester, or have a summer break. LPN programs usually have no breaks.

    Bottom line is that if you wish to be a nurse on any level, you have to work REALLY HARD at it AND pass NCLEX. And, I'll tell you something-whether you believe it or not, the mental as well as the physical work a nurse does is even more stressful, because of the accountability and liability. You will begin to see why a nurse counts on good aides and ancillary staff, because ultimately, the nurse (especially the RN) is responsible for the outcomes of ALL of it.
    proud2blpn is totally right. I have been LPN for almost ten years and was a cna for 4 years before that, and that is one very good description the job of a licensed nurse. I wish I had known all of that coming into nursing, it can be tough to learn along the way, and schools should stress that more I think :")
    pagandeva2000 likes this.
  8. 0
    People flunk out of LPN school too. It can't be because they are stupid, because LPN school has an entrance test identical to the RN school.

    In our particular school, the schooling itself wasn't easier, however we had much better faculty than the RN school. Our LPN faculty was/is dedicated to the students and if you struggled, help was available. That was/is not the case in the RN school. The RN school is based in a college that will continue to exist even if all of the the RN students drop out or flunk out. The LPN school exists as a single entity and the continued existence of the school depends on its ability to adequately prepare people to pass the boards. Our school has the highest pass rates in the state.

    No matter where you go to school you need to put aside the partying and have a good support system at home, especially if you have families to take care of. While some people need to study more than others, studying is essential to passing.

    Our LPN school was nearly identical to the RN school, but crammed into less than 1/2 of the time. With 1600 applicants to the RN school per year, it was much easier to secure a spot in the LPN school. I completed the LPN, got my license, and enrolled in the LPN to RN hybrid program and will have the RN in less time than if I would have just gone there from the start. I don't regret going to LPN school and wouldn't change it if I could.
  9. 0
    hybrid program? cool. you must save a lot of gas.
  10. 0
    Ya Kev, they just started it a year ago. The existing ASRN program started it since so many LPNs were returning to school. You test out of NSG 101, 102, OB and peds and pass a series of practicums and then do a 2 semester LPN to RN program in a hybrid format... testing, lectures and discussion groups online and then two full days per month clinical rotations in the hospital. I'll have paid less and gotten the RN in one year versus almost three. Coupled with the 45 bachelor credits I already had, I'll have the BSN in one additional year, for a total of three years LPN to BSN with less than $15,000 in student loans.
  11. 0
    The school I went to, which is the same at all tech schools in wi, the 1st year of the RN program is the LPN program. So in order to get to the 2nd year of the RN program you must complete the LPN program. When you complete the 1st year you are able to take the PN nclex. I personally think to 1st year (the LPN program) was more difficult and stressful you don't know what to expect and what the instructor expect from you.
    Last edit by justrissy on Jul 28, '08 : Reason: add to post


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