LPN to RN vs LPN to BSN

  1. 0
    I have about a year experience working with my LPN license and now I'm ready to further my education since my end goal is a masters.
    I'm stuck on whether to go for my RN first before my BSN or just go straight for my BSN.
    Any input would be greatly appreciated
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  3. 13 Comments so far...

  4. 2
    I always believe that stepping on the next step of the ladder doesn't hurt that stepping few steps then you'd tip over. That's what I did when I decided to go first for my LPN than going straight to RN program. At least, if I have my LPN under my belt and I decided to go for my RN, then something happens.. at least I have something to fall back on. Same as like you, I'd suggest get the ADN then move up to BSN, but if you think you got it all planned, hey now..go for BSN! Good luck!
    SE_BSN_RN and student forever like this.
  5. 0
    Hey! Sounds like our plans are similar in nature. I don't know where you are from but here we have a school that offers a BSN/MSN track. Because of this, I have decided to get my ADN first so that I can work on my BSN and MSN at the same time and possibly have the facility I work for pay for it. Best wishes.
  6. 0
    I'm just a pre-nursing student, so my opinion probably isn't helpful, but I've read a lot about this and am asking myself the same questions. All in all, I think it just depends on your location. What is the pay advantage to being an ADN to an LPN in your area? Where I'm at, there isn't any. I can actually make more as an LPN in LTC than as an ADN RN in a hospital. On the other hand, if I could make much more as an RN, I would get there as quickly as possible.

    The nursing programs in your area are the other major factor. Where I live, I can go to the University of Oklahoma's LPN to BSN program once I get an LPN license. It will take me a year to do the pre-requisites and 9 months to do the program. So all in all, it will take about 2 years to get a BSN. All the ADN programs in my area take about 2 years as well, so I might as well just go for my BSN. However, if I could go to a program locally and get my ADN a year sooner than my BSN, I might consider getting the ADN first and then continue on to BSN. Again, it just depends on the pay issue and what programs are at your disposal.

    Good luck to you, whatever you do!
    Last edit by alotusforyou on Jan 6, '13
  7. 0
    I'm debating the same thing. I have my LPN and am working as a nurse. I've been accepted to a RN program and a LPN-BSN program. It seems like the step by step way is the "safest". I'll get my RN license withing one year and then after that continue to my Bachelors. Seems simple BUT, if I do a RN to BSN program that means I have to do the clinicals and take my boards a third time! So, am I just making more work for myself? I don't want to repeat clinicals and boards for a third time, but is that worse than putting of my RN until I'm complete the Bachelors program? Any adivce would help.
  8. 0
    I'm currently an LPN and I had this same dilemma. Go straight for the BSN, since it is one of my goals, or go for my ADN. I ended up taking the ADN route essentially because of time and convenience. Once I get my ADN, I can take the boards and get RN licensure. Then I can take an online RN to BSN program. The ADN first is just a better fit for me. Plus, I also like the idea of taking things in steps.

    Jessika-I'm pretty sure you would not need to take the NCLEX-RN over once you've passed it. An RN is an RN. ADN or BSN you won't need to retake the NCLEX.
  9. 0
    Do whatever gets you your license fastest. I did LPN to RN in 9 months, then RN to BSN in a year (was a few years in between spent working as an RN).
  10. 0
    Quote from jessika12gold
    I'm debating the same thing. I have my LPN and am working as a nurse. I've been accepted to a RN program and a LPN-BSN program. It seems like the step by step way is the "safest". I'll get my RN license withing one year and then after that continue to my Bachelors. Seems simple BUT, if I do a RN to BSN program that means I have to do the clinicals and take my boards a third time! So, am I just making more work for myself? I don't want to repeat clinicals and boards for a third time.
    FYI Once you take and pass the NCLEX-RN you never have to retake them again reguardless of what further education you earn. An RN is an RN reguarless if they have no degree or a PhD.
  11. 1
    Quote from jessika12gold
    I'm debating the same thing. I have my LPN and am working as a nurse. I've been accepted to a RN program and a LPN-BSN program. It seems like the step by step way is the "safest". I'll get my RN license withing one year and then after that continue to my Bachelors. Seems simple BUT, if I do a RN to BSN program that means I have to do the clinicals and take my boards a third time! So, am I just making more work for myself? I don't want to repeat clinicals and boards for a third time, but is that worse than putting of my RN until I'm complete the Bachelors program? Any adivce would help.
    You will not need to take your boards over again once you complete a RN program.

    I'm LPN-BSN through a university, so I'm partial to completing a BSN program. I thought about the step by step method, but it seems that, for me, to go for the gold...and there are LPN-BSN programs that may be tailored for that transition.

    You may also have the option to challenge some courses as well...I had an option to, but declined. I also went part time and was in a class with second degree and traditional students. It was two years straight, and was glad I went the "traditional" route in a BSN program.

    Go for the BSN program. I didn't regret it...passed boards the first time and landed a job in 8 months. Great position in a PICU. Survived my first two weeks and am surrounded by a great supportive staff.
    jessika12gold likes this.
  12. 0
    Any thoughts on RN to MSN and skipping BSN altogether?


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