LPN to ADN? 6 months, 6,000 bucks, all you gotta do is move to Alaska :)

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    I see a lot of people looking to get their R.N. quickly and asking if anyone knows of programs. So here ya go There are some pre-reqs (24 credits) including: Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II with labMicrobiology with lab Nutrition (for Health Sciences)Human Lifespan DevelopmentEnglishWritten CommunicationCollege Algebra current LPN license in the state of Alaska is also required. I don't know if there are waivers for other states. When I moved back here in June, it cost me just over 400 bucks to transfer my Texas LVN license to an Alaska LPN license. The total cost of the program is 6200.00 and the program is roughly 6 months. I don't know what the waiting list looks like, or even if there is one. The program is farly new- I am hoping to attend in the spring of 2014.Cost of living in Anchorage can be expensive and the weather is not for everyone. But I hear that job prospects for new grad R.N.s are better than in other parts of the country if you like it and want to stay here. If you are dedicated to getting that RN as quick and cheap as possible, it would be worth looking into. If anyone is interested, I know lots about Alaska and would be happy to share what I know. Good luck!!!http://www.avtec.edu/RN.htm
    Last edit by JustBeachyNurse on Jan 17, '13 : Reason: Formatting

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  2. 11 Comments...

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    Also, when I typed this, it had paragraphs and looked much better than it does now. Can anyone give me tips on how to make the actual post look the same way it does when I type it?
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    Quote from nurseitout
    I see a lot of people looking to get their R.N. quickly and asking if anyone knows of programs. So here ya go There are some pre-reqs (24 credits) including: Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II with labMicrobiology with lab Nutrition (for Health Sciences)Human Lifespan DevelopmentEnglish, Written CommunicationCollege AlgebraA current LPN license in the state of Alaska is also required. I don't know if there are waivers for other states. When I moved back here in June, it cost me just over 400 bucks to transfer my Texas LVN license to an Alaska LPN licenseThe total cost of the program is 6200.00 and the program is roughly 6 months. I don't know what the waiting list looks like, or even if there is one. The program is farly new- I am hoping to attend in the spring of 2014.Cost of living in Anchorage can be expensive and the weather is not for everyone. But I hear that job prospects for new grad R.N.s are better than in other parts of the country if you like it and want to stay here. If you are dedicated to getting that RN as quick and cheap as possible, it would be worth looking into. If anyone is interested, I know lots about Alaska and would be happy to share what I know. Good luck!!!http://www.avtec.edu/RN.htm
    Hello, the information you posted is really helpful; however, I would like to ask you if one takes the program in Alaska can one have the option to take the Nclex in a different state or it have to be in Alaska; if so can someone be able to endorse the RN license in other state such ad Nevada Per say? Thank you in advance!
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    You can take your NCLEX in any State you chose. where you have your license paperwork sent prior to taking the NCLEX is where you'll be licensed. I live in CT, my school was in CT, a fellow classmate wanted to be licensed in CT and had the school send her paperwork to CT BON. However, my classmate lived closed to the NY/CT border and she lived closer to the NY NCLEX testing facility than she did to the CT one. she registered for the NCLEX to be tested at the NY site.
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    Hi and thank you for replaying.:. I just wonder if the program is accredited by the National league of nursing or CCNE
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    I really don't see that the program is any faster than any of the LPN to RN programs around here.

    Techinally yes my LPN to RN program runs over a calander year from Sept to May, but my program for the LPN to RN is 6 months in terms of time (Fall semester and Spring semester which is really only early September to early December for Fall..3 months and then late January to the 1st week of May for Spring..3 months). The program mentioned above is 6 months but you have to do the pre-reqs first and there alone with that list you're looking 2 semesters if you do 4 classes each semester and have no college credits to transfer to the pre-reqs. So you really aren't doing just 6 months total, you're doing 6 months of nursing classes and additional time for the pre-reqs.
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    Quote from CT Pixie
    I really don't see that the program is any faster than any of the LPN to RN programs around here.

    Techinally yes my LPN to RN program runs over a calander year from Sept to May, but my program for the LPN to RN is 6 months in terms of time (Fall semester and Spring semester which is really only early September to early December for Fall..3 months and then late January to the 1st week of May for Spring..3 months). The program mentioned above is 6 months but you have to do the pre-reqs first and there alone with that list you're looking 2 semesters if you do 4 classes each semester and have no college credits to transfer to the pre-reqs. So you really aren't doing just 6 months total, you're doing 6 months of nursing classes and additional time for the pre-reqs.
    Since most programs (the ones I looked into, anyway) have pre-reqs, I don't really factor that into my time to complete the course- I look at the pre-reqs as time you will have to put in mostly regardless of what program you choose. For me, a lot of the pre-reqs were required classes for my LPN school as well- so that means I don't have to put in the time to do them now as I have already done them. I am thinking this holds true for many others as well. Last, many of the pre-reqs can be earned via CLEP testing. Takes a lot of dedication, but it is a quick way to get credits. I have CLEPed several subjects and usually allot 3-4 weeks of studying for each.

    Last, yeah, the time actually in class is 6 months, which could almost be equal to a two semester program (8 months). But when you factor in summer break, the time to actually being able to sit for the NCLEX-RN in my program is 6 months, compared to a year in a two semester program with a summer break. I know for me, that is pretty huge- that I could potentially get my RN license 6 months earlier and start working in that capacity sooner.

    Just food for thought, putting it out there as an option for those in the same boat as me and looking for a quick way to get to that RN. Good luck to all of us, no matter what path we are on!
    Last edit by nurseitout on Jan 17, '13 : Reason: edit typos
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    do you know if they are accrediated??
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    They are only in the second year of their program so don't have the graduation statistics to become accredited yet. They have applied and are on course to become accredited. They have not had any negative marks from the accrediting agency.
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    I looked it up online. I'm so worried about getting into transition class I'm stressed to max! I don't want to do excelsior period.


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