Is it easier? - page 2

Do you think it is an easier adjustment to go from LPN to RN than it would have been having no previous knowledge of nursing? Or does it make it more difficult because you have preconceived ideas... Read More

  1. by   SFCardiacRN
    Meo is right IMHO. Critical thinking is the core of being an RN (though I have worked with experienced LVN's that are quite adept at it). Love that kitty Meo!
  2. by   meownsmile
    Quote from SFCardiacRN
    Meo is right IMHO. Critical thinking is the core of being an RN (though I have worked with experienced LVN's that are quite adept at it). Love that kitty Meo!
    thanks,,
  3. by   luv4nursing
    I think I have good clinical thinking skills so I hope the RN program wont be too difficult. My challenge is I am good at being able to choose the right thing to do, but what about when you have to think it up all on your own? lol
  4. by   meownsmile
    Quote from luv4nursing
    I think I have good clinical thinking skills so I hope the RN program wont be too difficult. My challenge is I am good at being able to choose the right thing to do, but what about when you have to think it up all on your own? lol

    You mean when you have to improvise? That goes with critical thinking skills, and those are the things you will learn to integrate into the critical thinking skills you already have.
  5. by   luv4nursing
    Quote from meownsmile
    You mean when you have to improvise? That goes with critical thinking skills, and those are the things you will learn to integrate into the critical thinking skills you already have.
    yep thats what I mean
  6. by   IdahoGirl
    I think that being an LPN first can most certainly help with your clinicals. It has given me alot of confidence that way. Just be prepared to just become another student and be treated as though you have never been a nurse before. I never tell my preceptors on the clinical floor that I am an LPN, I just listen quietly and do as they say. When I go to perform a task they say oh my you learn fast. I just say well your a wonderfull preceptor at your young age of 23. I am 34 years old with a family, sometimes life teaches those of us whom are older a few things you just can't learn in a book. I watched as a young nurse was trying to help a new mom with breastfeading techniques, what a mess, I said I could share a few tips if she would like. I showed the new mom what I thought would work and it did. The nurse said how did you know that, you just started Maternal Child classes in school, I said I have 2 children, I felt like saying it's a no brainer but held my tongue. Also comparing my LPN clinicals to my RN clinicals, I would say most certainly that my LPN clinicals were much stronger. When we became IV certified in LPN school we practiced on each other, now they practice on dumies, big difference. We had to have 20 good sticks before we could do it clinically. There are students in my Rn class who have never stuck a human, only a dummie. No wonder they get out of RN school and require so much help from us little LPNs on the floor. I got long winded here, but I would say for sure my LPN schooling is an awesome foundation. I am glad I did it this way.
  7. by   NurseMatt
    Well I am starting my LPN Program next year sometime and it's the only way I cant think to do it to be prepare myself for it. 28 yrs old and going back to school from a long break. Plus think of all the experience you'll get.
  8. by   suebird3
    Quote from gooeyrn
    i was an lpn before becoming an rn. i found it much easier this way. you don't have to learn all of the terminology, you have the basics, and already have practice w/ a lot of the skills, so you aren't as nervous in clinical. its just difficult to remember to do things "by the book" in clinicals sometimes if you have developed any bad habits. i prefered not to let teachers know that i was an lpn. this way i wasn't expected to know everything, or though of as "the class know it all".
    geez...i hear this! after 26 years as an lpn, i would say i had quite a few "bad habits". yet, sometimes going "by the book" didn't always work; my one clinical instructor said that right off.

    meown was sooo correct in mentioning the critical thinking; it is knowing when to not "go by the book". i am in no way saying to do this all the time, of course. just think it through.

    suebird
  9. by   KacyLynnRN
    I did think it was easier going through school, already having my LPN knowledge. It sure made clinicals much easier, and a lot less nerve-wracking! Also, my orientation wasnt as difficult the second time around, but a lot of that had to do with the fact that I remained on the same med/surg floor I worked on as an LPN. I will say, though, I have been surprised as I have been working as an RN, you realize more and more that they are VERY different roles. And you don't really realize the how or why until you are working as an RN. Much different responsibilities!! Good luck to you,
    -Kacy
  10. by   1BlessedRN
    Quote from meownsmile
    I think technically, it made things a bit easier because most of the things your getting are familiar, however, learning how to think like an RN is the biggest change.

    Critical thinking is the key....

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