Confused Mom, (RN or LPN Wannabe)

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    Hi, all, I am a bit confused, I should say undecided. I am a 29 yr. old mother of a 3yr old and a wife. I have been debating with myself for the last 2 years on whether or not I should a LPN or a RN designation. All this time I spent debating, I could have been done with an associates program by now. I am a bit unsure as to what is the scope of practice for LPN's in New York State and is it something that I should pursue first then pursue the RN. I have a degree in Business and going back to school for nursing has been in the back of my mind. I know I will truly hate myself if I do not make an attempt to pursue this dream. My question is what would suggest since I have family obligations, and I would like to get to work as quickly as possible. My goal however is work in labor and delivery. Any input would be greatly appreciated.And what is this Cnet that I am told that I will have to take to be accepted into the LPN program also what is the job market like for LPN.
  2. 6 Comments so far...

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    While I do not know the scope of practice for an LPN in NY, I know that where I work (level one trauma center, and a NICU resource- we fly in the moms and babies from all over the state) we do not hire LPN's. There is no if and or but about it. They aren't used anymore. I know they are used at some hospitals but not ours. I am sure they will continue to be used in some places as the shortage gets larger. If you really want L and D, get an associates degree- many of them will alow you to take LPN boards after your first year- you can start working as an LPN then and also finish off your RN, So you can get a position a L and D and not have to have the RN sign off everything you do! I want to say immediately, I have nothing against LPN's. Worked with some great ones at another hospital. But if your ultimate goal is to be fully active in L and D the RN is probably the better route- so you can give all the meds IV push etc. Best of luck to you!
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    Hi there, My name is Mark, im a 37 yr old 2nd semester nursing student also from NY. Im also a full time NYC Police Officer. First of all, good luck!!! You will do fine, im sure. The main difference between an RN & an LPN is that LPN's do make assessments and must work and report directly to an RN. Other than that there is no difference. I suggest you get your RN, it affords more oppurtunity. If you ever want to chat, drop me a line (bnbh623@aol.com) Us NYers have to stick together!!!! Mark
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    Hi, my name is Angela! I am 23 however married with 3 kids. I am in my sophmore year in the ADN program for RN and enjoying it, now that I am getting the jist of things! lol! Anyways the LPN's in the South are used alot in the hospital, home health, etc. so I disagree with the other who said that eventually there will not be any. In our hospital the LPN's give out meds, the RNs job is to delegate them to what they can do. IV's, and tube feedings I know they can't do for sure and there are some medications they can't give too. I think you should get your RN first. 2 years isn't really that long. I say that now that I only have 1 year left. lol! It's hard and requires alot of studying! Pay is better than an LPN though! Good luck!
    Angela www.geocities.com/ajax_clean/StudentNurse.html
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    I went back to school at age 40, and I finally finished last May as an ADN. My oldest sister has been an LPN for 15 years, and I STARTED out making more money than she does now. We use LPN's a great deal, and some of the best preceptors that I had were LPN's. However, they can't hang blood, do pushes, assessments, etc....My assessment skills were really honed to a fine edge in our local nursing program, and I have showed my LPN sister some things, and she has shown me easier ways to do some clinical work. In the South, many LPN's rise to Unit Manager positions in Nursing Homes, but I love acute care. Med-Surg has really taught me to have faith in my intuition and believe in myself. I am currently working in a Psyche Hopsital, where every day is an adventure, and I PRN for the local hospital. I can go anywhere and do most anything with my RN license. Go for the shorter title, it just takes a bit longer to get there. My sister wishes she had gone RN when she was in school, but at age 55, she is looking to retire soon.....Keep us posted! Good luck to you and all of the nursing students out there! You can do this! ONE DAY AT A TIME!Hugs! Jo
    Originally posted by Trinigirl:
    Hi, all, I am a bit confused, I should say undecided. I am a 29 yr. old mother of a 3yr old and a wife. I have been debating with myself for the last 2 years on whether or not I should a LPN or a RN designation. All this time I spent debating, I could have been done with an associates program by now. I am a bit unsure as to what is the scope of practice for LPN's in New York State and is it something that I should pursue first then pursue the RN. I have a degree in Business and going back to school for nursing has been in the back of my mind. I know I will truly hate myself if I do not make an attempt to pursue this dream. My question is what would suggest since I have family obligations, and I would like to get to work as quickly as possible. My goal however is work in labor and delivery. Any input would be greatly appreciated.And what is this Cnet that I am told that I will have to take to be accepted into the LPN program also what is the job market like for LPN.
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    Hi!

    I agree with much of the advice you've been given. It's all great advice, but what some doesn't take into account is your own personal situation. Only YOU know what that is!

    If you have the means (like time and ability to do without an extra year of income) then by all means go for your RN first. Why wouldn't you? If, however, it is not feasible to do all the prereqs and wait to get in a program and then finish it, then don't shut the door on the LPN option. I remember what it was like facing school with a hubby and little ones. It can be done, though!

    I just finished my LVN and can say with all honesty that I'm thilled. Like you, my dream is L&D, so that's why I'm finishing prereqs and will persue a bridge program. I was in a hurry to start bringing in an income so I chose this route.

    In California, we have a large scope which includes IVs (starting them and hanging fluids, once certified) and hanging blood. Any LPN program can tell you the scope for your state, as well as the board of nursing.
    No one signs anything off for me. But again, this could differ in another state.

    I have heard of hospitals that don't use LPNs, but have no witnessed such a facility here. In CA, the shortage is such that I was just offered $21 to pass meds in a conv. I may do it per diem, but I work acute right now for a little less and will probably stay for the experience. Of course I could make more with my RN (which I hope to attain someday), but for an 18 month investment, how can I complain!? As a supplement to hubby's salary, it takes care of the family quite nicely. So will your RN. Decisions, decisions..

    I'm not trying to talk you into one or the other. Attain the highest level of education as you can afford right now. But at the same time, keep your options open and you'll find the right thing for you and your family.

    Best of luck with school! Email me anytime,
    Julie
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    Go for it! I had a 3 yr old daughter when I went back to nursing school for my RN. In the course of the 2.5 yrs it took me to get my degree, I had a second daughter... on the first day of class no less. I now have 2 great kids and a wonderful nursing career that I am very proud to be in. Last semester, I started on my BSN. While I often wonder how I did it (and how I am going to do it) I am sure glad I did. Although, my original goal had been L&D too... I found out there were so many facets to nursing I loved... that I never worked L&D!


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