To BSN or not to BSN - page 2

by J.D. 3,320 Views | 24 Comments

Hello everyone! I am currently an LVN ( In california ) recently graduated, I have been mostly volunteering and keeping my old job in retail so I can continue school ( at a JC at the moment). My question is, whether to become... Read More


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    There is a big push in the Medical Center in Houston for BSN because of hospital certification. Admin is pushing 20 yr ADN to get their BSN and that's not going to happen. University of Indiana has a LPN to BSN online program u might look at. Make sure Ca. accepts that program. I wish you the best of Luck. Just take a minute and see where the Nursing Industry is go to be in 5-7 years. Don't base ur decision on today's requirements.
    SE_BSN_RN likes this.
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    I'm in upstate NY, and though my employer is a magnet hospital, they accept ADN nurses- I'm one of them.

    That being said, I'm not sure why you couldn't get your ADN then start working as a registered nurse while you get your BSN. That way you are getting nursing experience and getting paid while you finish your degree, and if you want to get into an MSN program, you'll have at least two years worth of RN experience under your belt as soon as you are done with your BSN, which some programs require. That is what I am doing. I worked full time and homeschooled my child while I was going to nursing school full time, so it it doable.
    Last edit by dandk1997RN on Aug 26, '12 : Reason: missing word added
    Red35, annlewis, and SE_BSN_RN like this.
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    Hey DMCRNC,
    When i said " Just an RN", i didnt mean to down talk on the title of a Registered Nurse, I merely spoke on the difference to RN-->BSN.I have the up most respect for any dedicated nurse.

    During my LPN-NCLEX examination reviews, the most knowledgeable and helpful nurse was "JUST" an LVN, and by no means just i down talk about her, but i elevate here status. Her knowledge was inspiring and for such a young age to work a city hospital too. It was amazing. sadly the titles are now a medical/political thing now. Any nurse whether, LPN/RN/MSN/NP is a nurse and something to be proud of.
    klace84, annlewis, SE_BSN_RN, and 1 other like this.
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    Thanks to everyone for the helpful comments thus far and sharing your wisdom. And thanks for that link "Nursewithskills"!!
    It seems acquiring any higher education is a great idea and something to strive for, then again bettering ourselves is a part of the nightengale pledge we took.
    SE_BSN_RN and Pleased2piecesLPN like this.
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    Quote from Kimberlina
    I'm in upstate NY, and though my employer is a magnet hospital, they accept ADN nurses- I'm one of them.

    That being said, I'm not sure why you couldn't get your ADN then start working as a registered nurse while you get your BSN. That way you are getting nursing experience and getting paid while you finish your degree, and if you want to get into an MSN program, you'll have at least two years worth of RN experience under your belt as soon as you are done with your BSN, which some programs require. That is what I am doing. I worked full time and homeschooled my child while I was going to nursing school full time, so it it doable.
    Thanks for the post Kimberlina, i really like your idea to get ADN, then BSN while employed and so on. Wow, i am always amazed by the perseverance of many people. Your story is great to hear. Congrats to you!
    klace84 and SE_BSN_RN like this.
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    Quote from J.D.
    Hello everyone! I am currently an LVN ( In california ) recently graduated, I have been mostly volunteering and keeping my old job in retail so I can continue school ( at a JC at the moment). My question is, whether to become simply an RN or BSN. There are several programs near my to become both. From what I have research, most hospitals or any acute care center for that matter prefers or wants BSN's. Is that mostly true in California? How is it out of state? or out of the Bay area from Cali?

    My question is basically If i become just an RN is it going to be that impossible to get employment? I don't really want to spend another 2-3 years on prereqs and then the 2 more years of nursing. Where as I could just take the 2-2.5 years to become an RN. I know they say, "oh but for BSN you can get into management"...eh thats not really my interest. I want to be there helping people or teach after i have experience. I am more of a holistic nurse at heart anyway. "PREVENTION IS KEY" I always say. haha

    Well let me know what you all think. Advise or comments are welcome. Even your own experiences if you do not mind sharing! Thanks and take care!
    Where in Cali are you? Do your BSN, and don't wait. I didn't want a BSN, either, because I didn't want to go into management....now here I am, 7 years later, finally almost done with my BSN program, and I regret my decision to wait so long. Times are changing, and things are going to get much tougher (IMHO). If you are in the bay area (San Jose, Santa CLara, that area), call HR at area hospitals. Check with Valley Med, or Kaiser. Call SJSU and go in and meet with an advisor, and go over your options.
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    Quote from J.D.
    Hello everyone! I am currently an LVN ( In california ) recently graduated, I have been mostly volunteering and keeping my old job in retail so I can continue school ( at a JC at the moment). My question is, whether to become simply an RN or BSN. There are several programs near my to become both. From what I have research, most hospitals or any acute care center for that matter prefers or wants BSN's. Is that mostly true in California? How is it out of state? or out of the Bay area from Cali?

    My question is basically If i become just an RN is it going to be that impossible to get employment? I don't really want to spend another 2-3 years on prereqs and then the 2 more years of nursing. Where as I could just take the 2-2.5 years to become an RN. I know they say, "oh but for BSN you can get into management"...eh thats not really my interest. I want to be there helping people or teach after i have experience. I am more of a holistic nurse at heart anyway. "PREVENTION IS KEY" I always say. haha

    Well let me know what you all think. Advise or comments are welcome. Even your own experiences if you do not mind sharing! Thanks and take care!
    And in order to teach you need a master's degree. In order to get a MSN, you need the RN.
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    Quote from J.D.
    Well I went to a vocational school for my LVN. I didn't stop to consider if my coursework would be able to transfer then. Most schools that I have talked to won't accept anything from them, so it's like basically restarting my GE. Thats why i would have another 2 years or so of GE. Especially since the JC i attend has a huge student population, wait lists and few classes area big problem.
    Staying in Cali is not a concern for me, I would move. However I would like to stay but its not really a huge deal. Isn't so crazy, people want to be nurses to help out, and even with a BSN as a new grad you may not get a 100% chance of hire. Always amazes me.

    For now I'm talking GE to be on track for a BSN program but how long it takes is so discouraging. =/
    If you are at a JC, you won't have problems with credits transfering. What school did you go to where your credits won't transfer? You can also CLEP out of a lot of your GE. Might be worth looking into. That will save you a lot of time (and money!)
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    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Where do you want to work? Most LTC facilities don't require a BSN for any position, all the way up to DON. And LTC nursing is more holistic than acute care. Hospitals focus on medical dx, for obvious reasons. If you want to be an actual nursing educator, you will need a BSN, of course. But there's plenty of jobs for ADNs.
    To be a DON you HAVE to have an RN, no exceptions. To be an educator you have to have a MSN, not a BSN. Some BSN's can teach clinicals, but you have to have experience in a field to do that.
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    Quote from DMCRNC
    I am really sad about the comment of just an RN. I worked with my ADN for 34 years and I flll like I was an RN not just an RN. Since then I got my BSN and will starting school in Sept for my MSN. I believe that you should go for your BSN. Please don't think that a nurse with her ADN is "just a nurse". Many great RN's out their work with a ADN.
    The same can be said for LPN's. I can't tell you how many times I, being an LPN, have said something along those lines about myself, to an RN. And they tell me, "You are a lot more than JUST and LPN." You are also a lot MORE than JUST an RN. and you are also a lot MORE than JUST a NURSE.
    klace84 likes this.


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