Any RN Bridge Plans?

  1. How many of the LVNs/LPNs plan to enroll in an LVN-to-RN bridge program if they are not already enrolled in one?

    I completed a one-year long LVN program in October and my NCLEX-PN exam is scheduled for the end of December. I am not the type of person who likes to make too many elaborate future plans because it might 'blind' me in the present. However, I definitely plan to enroll in an LVN-to-RN bridge program once I know with certainty that I've passed the NCLEX. First and foremost, I need to concentrate on passing the NCLEX because that will determine whether I'll ever work as a nurse.
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  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   zo2fan4ever
    I am enrolled to start pre-nursing classes for a RN bridge program at my local community college in Jan.'06. And looking forward to it.
  4. by   luv4nursing
    I just graduated in September and took boards in October. I wanted to go to the LPN-RN bridge at either of the local communty colleges in January but the time of year we graduated was off so I missed the application period. Since I dont want to wait a year until next January, Im enrolling in Excelsior (distance learning). God willing I will make it thru the CPNE and I hope to be finished (as in done with CPNE and possible even boards) by next January. That woud be a whole year sooner I could work as an RN.
  5. by   meownsmile
    Just make sure you state recognizes Excelsior. I dont think my state does. However, whats wrong with working in the LPN role for a year,, waiting for your next open application period at your CC?
    There is nothing like experience to engrain your knowledge base and make you better at what you do.
  6. by   suebird3
    i agree w/ meown. experience is good...and gives you confidence.


    suebird
  7. by   luv4nursing
    Quote from meownsmile
    Just make sure you state recognizes Excelsior. I dont think my state does. However, whats wrong with working in the LPN role for a year,, waiting for your next open application period at your CC?
    There is nothing like experience to engrain your knowledge base and make you better at what you do.

    Yes, FL accepts EC as long as u are an LPN (no RTs or paramedics). I guess Im just "over it" as far as waiting. I feel like Ive been waiting my life away to be a nurse. Ive been trying to go to either LPN or RN school since I was 21-22, Im now 25 and finally went to LPN school last year. Im also ready to start a family but I would prefer to get my RN first. So I kinda feel like why put off till tomorrow what u can do today. Who knows what may happen in the next year that could keep me from going back, or I could just get in a comfort zone and put it off till "later" then later will be 10 years. All the LPNs and RNs I know tell me go back to school NOW while I still can and while Im still motivated to do it and dont put it off. Besides, by the time Im finished Ill have a year or so under my belt. I will still have more experience than new grad RNs who are just entering the field. I plan to also ease my way into it by getting an exernship or residency that will help me to develop any skills Im lacking, instead of jumping in and being thrown to the wolves. Most of my teachers say RN school is just like LPN school except you go into more detail as far as theory.
  8. by   anbreen
    CA USED to accept EC, but not since 2003.
  9. by   BennyFan
    I am an LPN who after many years is in a bridge program LPN-BSN. By the time I'm finished it will have taken me 14 years to finish. I do think getting some experience is good, I am in a program with new grad LPN's and it is easier for me with the years of experience that I have - age also helps. There is less "people pleasing" when you are working with prof's who are in your age group. Good luck in whatever you decide - my advise - def. get it done before kids, that is why it took me so long.
  10. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from BennyFan
    Good luck in whatever you decide - my advise - def. get it done before kids, that is why it took me so long.
    But better late than never.

    BTW welcome to the site!
  11. by   kathyann
    Actually, California accepts an Excelsior degree. I have an Excelsior degree, and a California license.
    Fact is, I worked as a travel nurse, and had no problems with any state accepting my excelsior degree, although I did not practice in Illinois, had no desire to!
    Kathy
  12. by   iheartnursing_cali
    I guess my situations kinda weird....

    I actually finished all my G.E. as well as pre-reqs for the ADN program at my CC. and will be applying this fall, however, I will also be applying to a LVN/LPN program this August also, so if the CC I applied to has not accepted me into the RN program yet, I will finish the LVN program. And after graduating and passing the NCLEX, I can enroll into the LVN-RN Bridge at a local vocational nursing school (after working for 6 months, which is required) and receive my ADN there instead... but only if the CC I applied to has not accepted me into their RN program.

    So basically, I'm kinda going backwards, finishing my pre-reqs, then taking the LVN program to become a LVN, then taking the LVN-RN Bridge, then becoming a RN.

    I've just been stressing off what I'm going to do. I actually attended at vocational nursing school for LVN before going back to a CC about 3 yrs ago and doing all my G.E. and pre-reqs, but only finished the vocational school's pre-req requirements for their program then backed out to go back to a CC to become a RN instead (Now I keep thinking to myself, WAS I CRAZZZY?? I would've been working as a LVN already). Because now it seems like forever to become a RN, and I'm having doubts if I'm ever going to be accepted into any RN Prgoram, So I'm thinking... is this the fastest way to go. Plus, I know I will be ahead of the game once I am in the LVN-RN Bridge program, because I would have more knowledge and experience.

    Need your opinions..... PLEASE!!
  13. by   LanaBanana
    I already have all my gen eds completed, now am working on the sciences. I will start the LPN program in May and plan to take 1 science class each semester while doing that program to finish those up. I would love to have all my sciences completed by the time I finish LPN! The school I'm going to do LPN-BSN program requires 1 year of work experience for LPNs before starting and after so many years of school, it would be nice to take a year off! I've already sworn to myself though that I only get 1 year off and then I WILL do the bridge.
  14. by   anbreen
    Quote from Soon2bRN_Cali
    I guess my situations kinda weird....

    I actually finished all my G.E. as well as pre-reqs for the ADN program at my CC. and will be applying this fall, however, I will also be applying to a LVN/LPN program this August also, so if the CC I applied to has not accepted me into the RN program yet, I will finish the LVN program. And after graduating and passing the NCLEX, I can enroll into the LVN-RN Bridge at a local vocational nursing school (after working for 6 months, which is required) and receive my ADN there instead... but only if the CC I applied to has not accepted me into their RN program.

    So basically, I'm kinda going backwards, finishing my pre-reqs, then taking the LVN program to become a LVN, then taking the LVN-RN Bridge, then becoming a RN.

    I've just been stressing off what I'm going to do. I actually attended at vocational nursing school for LVN before going back to a CC about 3 yrs ago and doing all my G.E. and pre-reqs, but only finished the vocational school's pre-req requirements for their program then backed out to go back to a CC to become a RN instead (Now I keep thinking to myself, WAS I CRAZZZY?? I would've been working as a LVN already). Because now it seems like forever to become a RN, and I'm having doubts if I'm ever going to be accepted into any RN Prgoram, So I'm thinking... is this the fastest way to go. Plus, I know I will be ahead of the game once I am in the LVN-RN Bridge program, because I would have more knowledge and experience.

    Need your opinions..... PLEASE!!
    No, I don't think you are crazy. A problem is...There are SO many obstacles to entering RN programs... despite the much-lamented nurse shortages. One would think that if it's THAT bad, money could be made available to expand training programs, or establish more of them. And, maybe a few superfluous "hoops" could be removed from the applications process. It REALLY shouldn't take five years to get through an AA program.

    Give you an example. I have an MA degree in an allied health profession, and am a CCM. I have been doing medical case management and UR for a long time, and have managed a unit of UR nurses. I decided to become an RN.

    The local JC has the two-year waiting list. So, I approached Meric. I was told I would have to take a year of "fluff" GE classes, BEFORE I could take the prerequisites. This includes Speech 101 (though I was a college debater,and have been speaking before professional groups for a long time), English Comp. (c'mon... parsing sentences never changes... and I got a high score on that part of the entrance exam), and Psych 101 (which I am credentialled to TEACH at a JC level). They wanted to waste a year of my time, in short.

    They also had some other, I felt, unecessesary tasks to complete, before acceptance. When I asked them why, they said, "We make it difficult, so we can get only the very BEST." No...... that way you get the most PERSISTENT, who may not be the best. Getting into grad school was a lot easier and more straight-forward.

    So........I went to another voc school, took the entrance exam, and submitted my records. Boom! I'm in. They only have the LVN program, but they expect to have the bridge w/i a year or so. I will also apply to the JC.. and go with whichever program takes me first. In the meantime, I can work as an LVN. I will make a lot less money, but I was bored silly with my previous profession. When I become an RN, I will go back up to my previous income.

    So.. I think your are doing JUST fine! :-)

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