Why are nursing instructors so intimidating? - page 2

by beeenieweeenie, RN 8,098 Views | 50 Comments

Why do nursing instructors feel the need to be so intimidating and humiliating? I am really struggling with this in my nursing class. Is there a good reason for this that I am just not getting yet? I was in a BSN program... Read More


  1. 0
    I'm sorry but I disagree with you. Everyone learns differently. Some people are motivated with intimidation tactics, some are not. We don't treat all of our patients the same, what works for one may not be effective for a different patient.

    There is a healthy level of anxiety that is good because it makes you study a little harder, read that procedure a few extra times, etc. Many nursing instructors take that way too far and it really just doesn't help at all and makes things way more stressful than they have to be.
  2. 1
    And I'm not disagreeing with you, but some students who are spoon fed and coddled will end up failing because they needed instructors who offered more control. You almost never hear anyone who fails complain that they weren't pushed harder to do better, do you? That's because this is all an emotional and judgmental issue. We are quick to dismiss the actions of someone we perceive as "nice" and condemn those who come across to us as tough or unfeeling.
    ElliShay likes this.
  3. 1
    i think we all have war stories about some of our instructors.

    in hindsight, i even appreciated the battleaxes.

    it was good prep/forewarning in what the real world was comprised of.


    leslie
    Angel@MyTable likes this.
  4. 0
    At my school the instructors are nice its the classmates that bring you to tears.
  5. 1
    I had an instructor that was very intimidating. At first, I easily got offended. Soon, though, I realized that, just as a child who has a parent who cares enough to scold a child to prepare it for the world, I was lucky to have an instructor who cared enough to teach me. I mean, other nurses, patients, physicians, patient's family members, etc., are all going to expect us to know our stuff, and if we don't or if we show weakness, it's not as though we'll likely be treated tenderly.

    If the instructor is just purely mean, that's a different topic. It's hard to tell until you're done with school, or faced with a stressful situation, so as students I guess we should try not to take things so personally, and see we might be getting a lesson even if it feels bad.

    My "nicest" clinical instructor-the one we all liked so much-didn't prepare my group for the rigors of the next semester. I thought she was awesome until I moved on, and now realize she wasn't doing me or our group any favors-but actually hurting us toward trying to become capable nurses.
    ElliShay likes this.
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    Well, I guess you could look at it this way- it will be good practice for when the docs yell at you (and it will happen).

    You really haven't been yelled at until a doc screams at you (for something that wasn't your fault in the first place) at the nurses desk at shift change while your patient is walking in the hall with their family. AND the student nurses and their instructor are there getting report along with the eve shift.

    Seriously, though, I feel for you. You have a good head on your shoulders. Grit your teeth through it and you'll be brilliant.
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    Quote from daisybaby
    Well, I guess you could look at it this way- it will be good practice for when the docs yell at you (and it will happen).

    You really haven't been yelled at until a doc screams at you (for something that wasn't your fault in the first place) at the nurses desk at shift change while your patient is walking in the hall with their family. AND the student nurses and their instructor are there getting report along with the eve shift.

    Seriously, though, I feel for you. You have a good head on your shoulders. Grit your teeth through it and you'll be brilliant.
    Seriously???? Because while I understand suck it up and deal when it comes to getting through school any way possible, because the end justifies the means, there is NO way I would let someone yell at me like I am a child in my place of business. none...zip...zilch.... If that means I leave my job and find some place where my coworkers are held to a higher standard, so be it. If it means there is no place for me in nursing, well thats fine too (although highly unlikely IMO) because no adult should be treated like they are a disobedient child.

    Thankfully there are 5 hospitals and about a thousand doctors offices, outpatient surgeries, LTCs, psych hospitals within driving distance for me, so I don't think it will be a problem, but I don't think ANYONE should tolerate being yelled at by a doctor or anyone else who is being paid to work together. Patients I understand because they are sick, scared, frustrated with their illness, etc and we are there to take care of them, but there's a big difference between a sick and scared and miserable patient possibly looking their mortality in the face for the first time and the doctor with the $100,000 sports car and salary to match.
    Terika9 likes this.
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    Quote from scorpiostudent
    Seriously????
    Believe me, once the dust settled I had a word with the unit director, and then the doc, in private. He apologized profusely, and we had a pretty congenial working relationship from there on in.

    You are right, nurses don't have to tolerate bad behavior of docs. If you are able to deal with it calmly and professionally the first time it happens, (thus one-upping the doc), you can nip it in the bud. Just about every facility has at least one of "those docs", unfortunately- but if you handle it the right way, the nurse always comes out on top.
    missjennmb likes this.
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    Quote from tothepointe
    At my school the instructors are nice its the classmates that bring you to tears.

    How true! Its almost like being thrown into a den of hungry lions.
  10. 0
    Yeah I don't know what it is. Maybe the stress but geez...


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