Which one would you choose?

  1. I have a choice between two schools to attend for my LPN.

    School #1 is known for their great LPN program, and it's only about 10 minutes away from me. Their NCLEX pass rate is 100%, and they just added an RN program a year ago, so I could hopefully do the LPN-RN bridge program there after completing the LPN program. The downside is, it's about $16,000, and it's 2 years long (4 semesters) as opposed to 1 year.

    School #2 has a very good reputation, and is also known for having a great program. It only costs $6,000 for the whole program, and it's only 11 months long. No RN program there, though. It's about 25 minutes from me, but it's in Mass (I live in NH, right on the border....the good thing is, I'd be making a lot more in Mass).

    So, my question is....which would YOU choose and why?
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   TheCommuter
    When deciding on an LPN program, always select the significantly cheaper option. Both educations will result in the exact same LPN licensure in the long run anyway, so why spend $10,000 extra on the pricier program when it is utterly unnecessary?

    Here's some more food for thought: in the real world, nobody really cares where you attended school for practical nursing. The only concerns of the hiring manager are that you're a warm body with a license, a pulse, and a willingness to fill their empty shifts.
  4. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from TheCommuter
    When deciding on an LPN program, always select the significantly cheaper option. Both educations will result in the exact same LPN licensure in the long run anyway, so why spend $10,000 extra on the pricier program when it is utterly unnecessary?

    Here's some more food for thought: in the real world, nobody really cares where you attended school for practical nursing. The only concerns of the hiring manager are that you're a warm body with a license, a pulse, and a willingness to fill their empty shifts.
    :yeahthat:
  5. by   Hospice Nurse LPN
    TheCommuter
    Here's some more food for thought: in the real world, nobody really cares where you attended school for practical nursing. The only concerns of the hiring manager are that you're a warm body with a license, a pulse, and a willingness to fill their empty shifts.

    Ditto to The Cummuter!
  6. by   kat7ap
    I would choose #2 because it's less expensive and a shorter program. It sounds like #1 is a part time program, so I would only attend that one if it was needed for me to continue working while I was in school.
  7. by   DreamyEyes
    Thanks for your replies, it sounds like I should go for #2.

    KAT7AP- It's actually full time! I don't know why it's 4 semesters, just the way the classes are broken down, I guess. But I don't really want to spend 2 years for my LPN, when I plan on going another 2 years for my RN shortly after.
  8. by   traumaRUs
    When I did the LPN program, I ended up in a one plus one program. It too was two years in length - the first year was pre-reqs for BOTH the LPN and RN program and then the second year was the LPN year. If you wanted the ADN (RN) then you went one more year.

    So...my idea is to find out if you are taking the prereqs for both LPN and RN in the first program. If you are, its cheaper and faster to just go there.

    This is especially true if you plan to go on to the RN program. It is possible to get the pre-reqs for BOTH programs at the same time -t hen you aren't repeating anything.

    Good luck.
  9. by   Jules A
    Quote from DreamyEyes
    Thanks for your replies, it sounds like I should go for #2.

    KAT7AP- It's actually full time! I don't know why it's 4 semesters, just the way the classes are broken down, I guess. But I don't really want to spend 2 years for my LPN, when I plan on going another 2 years for my RN shortly after.
    One thing I would check is that the cheaper school's gen-ed classes will be accepted toward the LPN to RN bridge program. Unless you are going for a BSN getting my RN after I had my LPN was only 3 semesters, not 2 years!

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