Where are compassionate caring educators

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    I am a LPN Nursing Student. I work hard and get good grades at a community college. I just had Surgery to remove a sigmoid tumor. It could not be done Laproscopic so recovery is 6 weeks. I thought from all the preaching and endless lectures about providing holistic care and compassion that at least a little leeway would be given to me during this time.

    All my professors talked a good game about if there was anything they could do but when the time comes they do not follow through once again a principle taught in nursing school. what a sham.

    I called a week ago to see what I needed to do to continue on with the program never heard back. I called the head today and she tells me I don't know how you are going to go on with the program since you are not registered. I am currently leaking fluid out my incision but I will risk driving to register in person. Makes no sense. and really make me think that what I was taught in fundamentals is a bunch of Nonsense. I see the next ordeal is they will want to flunk me for chemo. I don't get it.
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    I am also an LPN student. I had an MI on a Saturday night, missed clinicals that Sunday. Returned to class that Tuesday & received a warning for lost clinical hours (ie; if I missed another clinical day I'd be out of the program ). No wiggle room, no up to the Don's judgement. Nope these are the laws given to us from Moses, so it is written so shall it be done. Hopefully you have a good support system, I know I needed mine
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    It's not a matter of instructors not being "compassionate" or "caring." State BONs mandate a minimum number of classroom and supervised clinical hours required in order for graduates of nursing programs to be eligible to sit the NCLEX. Most programs have a pretty tight schedule to begin with, with not a lot of "wiggle room" built into the curriculum. And most programs these days have little or no opportunity for students to make up missed clinicals. So, you either make the scheduled clinicals without missing more hours than allowed, or you're at risk of not being eligible for licensure. Would you rather the school let you go ahead and finish the program and then find out you're not eligible for licensure? Yes, attendance requirements for nursing programs are strict. Yes, students have to drop out all the time because they missed too much time because of a legitimate medical situation. No, there isn't really anything that can be done about it, because it is a licensure requirement.
    HouTx, psu_213, Pepper The Cat, and 2 others like this.
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    I think there is always wiggle room. At the end of the day it is someone sitting behind a desk with a pen in hand checking off student hours. Depending on how far into clinicals your class was, they honestly could have just had you make it up in one volunteer day or shadowing or something. In some first year clinicals a student is lucky to even give an injection. Honestly it sounds like the people in your program just didn't care enough.
  7. 0
    Quote from arob1489
    I think there is always wiggle room. At the end of the day it is someone sitting behind a desk with a pen in hand checking off student hours. Depending on how far into clinicals your class was, they honestly could have just had you make it up in one volunteer day or shadowing or something. In some first year clinicals a student is lucky to even give an injection. Honestly it sounds like the people in your program just didn't care enough.
    How many nursing programs have you taught in? I'm certainly no expert, but I've taught in a few over the years, both ADN and BSN programs. Facilities won't allow students to be present outside of the already-agreed upon clinical rotation hours, or without a school instructor present to supervise. Someone can't just be sent to a hospital to "shadow" someone and call that a clinical day. Also, it's not cost-effective for schools to have a clinical instructor do a make-up day for one student, so they're not willing to do it (and, speaking as an instructor, I and most of the other faculty I've known over the years would not be personally willing to do that, regardles of the cost factors). Most hospitals nowadays are juggling groups of students from multiple schools and the clinical rotation schedules are v. tight. There just isn't a realistic mechanism for making up missed clinical days. If you miss more than the specified number of hours, you fail the rotation, however valid your excuse (and that typically means you're out of the program). The last psych clinical rotation I taught was an accelerated/compacted summer term -- we had 12-hour clinical days, but the max number of hours a student could miss was 8 hours (one "normal" clinical day). So, if any of the students had missed a full day of clinical, s/he would have been out of the program. If anyone had been sick, s/he would have had to at least come in for four hours of the day, or fail out of the nursing program (needless to say, I had some "under the weather" students during the term, but no one called in sick).

    Also, we rarely get the full story here. When a decision made by a school seems harsh or arbitrary, sometimes it's because there have been previous issues with a student and the current situation is simply "the final straw" and the school is glad to get rid of the person. I'm not suggesting that is the situation here, because we don't have any information about anything like that -- but it does happen.
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    Quote from arob1489
    I think there is always wiggle room.

    they honestly could have just had you make it up in one volunteer day or shadowing or something.

    Honestly it sounds like the people in your program just didn't care enough.
    I went to nursing school in a city with a population of approx. 100,000. The city had two medium sized hospital (around 300 beds in each hospital). There were 4 RN programs and at least 5 LPN programs in town. The hospitals sat down with the schools and divided clinical slots between them. As such, each school did not get very much more time that the bare minimum that required to remain certified.

    As for volunteering/shadowing--this is not clinical time. How can the school send a student in to follow a nurse for 8 hours and say that this takes the place of an actual clinical rotation?

    Finally, i find it difficulty to say that the program "just didn't care enough" based on a 3 paragraph account given by the OP. Yes, the program staff could have done more knowing the student was going to be out. They could have done more to make sure the student was properly registered. However, we don't know the entire story. We don't know what else the staff did or did not do for the OP. We will never know what they did behind the scenes to try and make it happen for the OP.
    elkpark likes this.


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