LVN School Accreditations QUESTION

  1. i am in the process of enrolling for an lvn program beginning in feb 2007 however i have a dilemma that i thought someone here could help me with. i'm deciding between two schools and i do not know which is better.
    how important is national accreditation?


    any feedback would be appreciated. thank you!
    Last edit by InsightfulNurse2B on Dec 30, '06
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   VickyRN
    Moving thread to more appropriate forum
  4. by   InsightfulNurse2B
    Which school did you attend and how was the program?
    Last edit by InsightfulNurse2B on Dec 30, '06
  5. by   GoldenFire5
    The one that matters is accreditation by the CA BON so you can sit for the NCLEX: the Board of Vocational Nurses & Psychiatric Technicians.

    Usually, when a school that offers an LVN to RN bridge program says they accept graduates from accredited LVN programs, they mean accredited by the CA BON. If you are very concerned about this issue, you could call a school where you would plan to do the LVN-RN program and ask them about it directly.

    Other good questions to ask are: where are your clinical sites? How many students are in each clinical group when we go to clinical sites? Smaller groups are better.

    What kind of feeling or vibe do you get from each school? That's important as well.
  6. by   TheCommuter
    Last year I attended a private, expensive LVN program in Southern California that was not accredited. It was only approved by the state. However, my LVN license is accepted by all schools and enables me to skip the first year of RN school when I enroll in an LVN-to-RN program.

    Many people have taken the private LVN school route and have successfully become RNs. Much of your coursework will not transfer since the schools are not accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, but the most important thing is that your LVN license will transfer.
  7. by   InsightfulNurse2B
    Thank you all so much for the helpful advice.
    Last edit by InsightfulNurse2B on Dec 30, '06
  8. by   Hoping LVN2BSN
    Where accreditation matters is if you decide to complete your RN and wish to TRANSFER the credits from classes that you took in LVN training. Classes such as A&P, Nutrition, Math will rarely transfer from a NATIONALLY accredited LVN school to community or four year colleges. If these course are a prerequisite or otherwise required, you will have to repeat the course.

    This is where many people get caught off guard, your LVN license will be accepted anywhere, but what surprises people is when their classes don't transfer and they have to go through the process of taking A&P, Micro, and things like that which have prerequisites of Biology and Chemistry. This can possibly set you back a year or more in your plan. I personally believe that there is no difference in the education between a private and public school, just be sure to have a plan in advance if you wish to go on to RN so there are no surprises or hiccups along the way.

    Good luck!
  9. by   Jules A
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Last year I attended a private, expensive LVN program in Southern California that was not accredited. It was only approved by the state. However, my LVN license is accepted by all schools and enables me to skip the first year of RN school when I enroll in an LVN-to-RN program.

    Many people have taken the private LVN school route and have successfully become RNs. Much of your coursework will not transfer since the schools are not accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, but the most important thing is that your LVN license will transfer.
    If your coursework doesn't transfer, how does that translate into actual class time or semesters to get your RN?

    One of the things that I liked about the CC where I went to LPN school is that we had most of the pre-reqs that are required and excepted by both the ADN bridge programs and then also BSN programs at local universities. If I can pass a written theory, math and demonstration skills test I will be able to get my RN in only two semesters, (fingers crossed, anti-jinx). If I had to take all the pre-reqs it would take at least another year.
    Last edit by Jules A on Dec 21, '06
  10. by   luv4nursing
    My LPN program was regionally but not nationally accredited and its approved by the FL board of nursing. I believe what is being spoken of above refers to the science courses taught in LPN school transferrring to RN school. Normally the A&P, nutrition, etc, taught in an LPN program is very brief and not nearly as in depth as a college course, thus it doesnt offer college credit so it will not transfer.

    I know this because I had already completed most of my RN pre reqs before I went to LPN school (I was sick of the waiting list so decided to get my LPN then bridge over). The material we went over in the LPN program barely scratched the surface compared to what was covered in a semester long college course. Also, u have to keep in mind that college level science classes(A&P and micro) include labs so even if u cover the same material, there is no lab so it isnt going to transfer. I didnt look at it as repeating the same classes over again because it wasnt a whole class....it was a matter of covering a moderate amound of material on the subject, being tested on it, and moving on to the next topic. The entire program is only 1 year long, so there is no way they can spend a long period of time on any one topic.

    If u have to take pre reqs to get into the LPN to RN bridge, u have to look at it as Generic RN students have to take the same pre reqs and spend 2 years in school after that. As an LPN, u need the pre reqs too, but u are given advanced standing so it only takes one year to complete your RN. So its the same 2 years of school after pre reqs all in all.

    That being said, I think I could pass any college level nursing class based on my LPN training without having taken the college A&P and Micro courses. They go more into depth than is needed, and it is hard to retain that much information over a long period of time. I say if u know your basic A&P, u are good to go.

    So basically it is my understanding that as long as the program is approved by your state board of nursing you shouldnt face any problems furthering your education or transferring your license to another state.
  11. by   Hoping LVN2BSN
    Quote from Jules A
    If your coursework doesn't transfer, how does that translate into actual class time or semesters to get your RN?

    One of the things that I liked about the CC where I went to LPN school is that we had most of the pre-reqs that are required and excepted by both the ADN bridge programs and then also BSN programs at local universities. If I can pass a written theory, math and demonstration skills test I will be able to get my RN in only two semesters, (fingers crossed, anti-jinx). If I had to take all the pre-reqs it would take at least another year.
    By earning your LVN license, this allows the first year of an ADN and some portion of the BSN programs to be skipped because the first year of nursing courses at the ADN level are similar to that of the LVN program. Not because your GE credits transfered, but because your license earned you advanced standing. Now that being said if you go to a Nationally accredited school, you would still have to complete any prerequisites your school requires before you're even able to apply for advanced standing to a step up program.

    So I think that matters more than a little bit to those of us who hope to be on a fast track to RN instead of taking 2 or 3 more semesters of classes between LVN-RN/BSN making us wish we had just waited for the full RN program in the first place.
  12. by   Jules A
    Quote from Hoping2/19/07
    Now that being said if you go to a Nationally accredited school, you would still have to complete any prerequisites your school requires before you're even able to apply for advanced standing to a step up program.

    So I think that matters more than a little bit to those of us who hope to be on a fast track to RN instead of taking 2 or 3 more semesters of classes between LVN-RN/BSN making us wish we had just waited for the full RN program in the first place.

    Maybe I'm missing something. It is my understanding that some of the tech schools don't have any pre-reqs but if you've gone to an accredited LPN program you should have needed most of the ADN pre-reqs to get into the LPN program in the first place, right? At least our LPN prgram required Psych, English, Math, A&P I & II and Micro so thats a decent chunk of what is needed for the bridge to RN. Really I don't feel like I'm back tracking too much especially with a couple of CLEPs that I've done.
  13. by   Hoping LVN2BSN
    Quote from Jules A
    Maybe I'm missing something. It is my understanding that some of the tech schools don't have any pre-reqs but if you've gone to an accredited LPN program you should have needed most of the ADN pre-reqs to get into the LPN program in the first place, right? At least our LPN prgram required Psych, English, Math, A&P I & II and Micro so thats a decent chunk of what is needed for the bridge to RN. Really I don't feel like I'm back tracking too much especially with a couple of CLEPs that I've done.
    You're right, I was attempting to answer your initial question of how does a PN/VN get advanced standing if their credits don't transfer. With the classes you have, you're in excellent shape, no back tracking for you. I currently go to a Nationally accredited program and am going on to an LVN-BSN hopefully after graduating in a few months. The program I have chosen allows entrance into the nursing program with advanced standing without the prereq's because they can be rolled into the nursing program. Good for me because my credits don't transfer and the classes I need, A&P I&II & Micro don't have prereq's only extending the program 3 months.
  14. by   Jules A
    Quote from Hoping2/19/07
    You're right, I was attempting to answer your initial question of how does a PN/VN get advanced standing if their credits don't transfer. With the classes you have, you're in excellent shape, no back tracking for you. I currently go to a Nationally accredited program and am going on to an LVN-BSN hopefully after graduating in a few months. The program I have chosen allows entrance into the nursing program with advanced standing without the prereq's because they can be rolled into the nursing program. Good for me because my credits don't transfer and the classes I need, A&P I&II & Micro don't have prereq's only extending the program 3 months.
    Gottcha, thanks for taking the time to remind me that I asked that in the first place! Either way sounds good and congratulations on heading right to your BSN.

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