Five courses?

  1. The LPN program that I am getting ready to attend in December has three semesters. The first two semesters have five courses and the last one has three. Isn't that a huge course load for someone? I also have two kids and it seems like the homework, tests etc. are going to be overwhelming.... In the first semester you have Nutrition 101, Intro to A & P, Intravenous Therapy and two other classes that I can't remember....
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   november17
    No worse than working a full time job, really. At least once you graduate you'll be able to leave work at work though. Nursing school isn't easy, and yes the courseloads can be pretty heavy.
  4. by   LPN4U
    I took my pre-req's before I applied to nursing program in the hopes of getting into the ADN-RN program and when I didnt I only had to focus on my nursing courses for the LPN. So now that I graduated I'm trying to bridge over to the RN program this Jan., I am taking my last pre-req's this semester to lessen the load. I also have 2 kids and a husband. It is dueable, just stay focus and motivated
  5. by   peridotgirl
    Quote from nurseontheway
    The LPN program that I am getting ready to attend in December has three semesters. The first two semesters have five courses and the last one has three. Isn't that a huge course load for someone? I also have two kids and it seems like the homework, tests etc. are going to be overwhelming.... In the first semester you have Nutrition 101, Intro to A & P, Intravenous Therapy and two other classes that I can't remember....
    hello, NURSEONTHEWAY. Yes, the LPN program that you have described does sound overwhleming, but it's manageable. Also, I would suggest try not to let the course work imtimdate you. I am in a similar boat you're in. I also am in an LPN program at Robert Morgan Educational Center. By so far, it's a lot of work and with my other classes, I sometimes feel stressed out. However, I work on a little nursing every night and when I have time. Also, I review my notes whenever I have time or try to learn new things to stay ahead and more focused. One tip that I always keep in mind is that : "I'm learning this for the patients." This helps me feel less stressed out when I say it. It give me a sense of purpose in what I'm studying in nursing. I hope this helps and I wish you all the best of luck in your LPN program.
  6. by   jean333
    Hi,

    My sister and I graduated in July and our school was 3 semesters. We only got 4 days off for Christmas break. My sister had 2 children under age 5. I am 18 and don't have any children. I watched my sister work her butt off(and so did I but I still live at home) but my sister had to take care of the kids plus house. There were many days she just felt like she would not make it. She use to say, what did I get myself in to? The work was HARD, the tests were constant and clinicals...STRESS....But we made it!!!! And yes there were days we LOVED school and days we HATED it. But my sister and I never quit. It was sooooo worth it. When you walk that graduation stage and you hear your name called, you will feel pure joy. You just have to learn to take one day at a time. My sister has a great job now in a doctors office. She loves it and makes very good money. GO FOR IT!!!! You will not be sorry

    Jean
    Last edit by jean333 on Oct 21, '07
  7. by   agldragonRN
    Quote from nurseontheway
    the lpn program that i am getting ready to attend in december has three semesters. the first two semesters have five courses and the last one has three. isn't that a huge course load for someone? i also have two kids and it seems like the homework, tests etc. are going to be overwhelming.... in the first semester you have nutrition 101, intro to a & p, intravenous therapy and two other classes that i can't remember....
    hi nurseontheway,

    i am a senior now in my 15-month program (just like yours). my first semester was kinda like what you describe. i took a&p, micro, nutrition, and funds in my 1st semester and boy was it overwhelming! but it was manageable as long as you keep reminding yourself that you want this and you can do it because you want to be a nurse. i almost had tests everyday and i had to "study" (or should i say cram the night before? ) constantly. but you will get use to it and soon enough you will get the hang of it. oh and my second semester, i took med-surg i, pharmacology, ob, and psych. and now i am taking med-surg ii, behavior & social science(sociology & psychology combined), and i will take peds last. so i guess my classes are divided evenly. well, good luck in nursing school and i'm sure you can make it if you give your 110 percent.

    angel
  8. by   michelle9655
    I go to school full-time AND work full-time and yes it can be very stressful! plus i lose a lot of my social life hahaha but just think about it, only a couple of years of stress for a great job for a lifetime. plus i am SUCH a procrastinator so that always gets me into trouble. at least i am on winter break now! and i always vow now to procrastinate next semester, but that never happens
  9. by   linzz
    Our LPN program is now two and a half years and five courses is a normal first year load. I found that the work load was managable though if you stay on top of your reading and start assignments as soon as you get them. I think that the number of courses isn't so much a concern as one course can be a lot of work and two elective type courses may not be that much work. I found that preparing for clinicals took the most time as we had to write a care plan and know each and every med that we were giving that day.
  10. by   pagandeva2000
    I didn't have that many classes when I started the LPN program, because we had to take the pre-requisite classes such as anatomy, psychology, etc before we entered. I had three when I started: Fundamentals, Pharmacology/Nutrition and Science & Art of Nursing I. This also included labs and clinicals. It was hard, but managable. It will be the same for you if you do as the others have suggested and keep up with the reading and assignments as soon as you receive them. Time management is of essence in nursing school (or any school for that matter). You have to look at all that you have in your life, eliminate what will distract you and adhere to a strict schedule in order to make it. It is worth it in the end. Good luck!
  11. by   mrsraisinkain
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    I didn't have that many classes when I started the LPN program, because we had to take the pre-requisite classes such as anatomy, psychology, etc before we entered.
    This is a good idea. I wonder why more schools don't do that (at least around here they don't) I've heard that so many students get weeded out of their LPN program when they A&P the first semester. It would make more sense to me to have that as a pre-req so if you don't pass the course before-hand you won't waste time and money starting the whole LPN program.
  12. by   nurseontheway
    I am the one that posted the original question. I started school on December 3rd. We have Intro to A & P, Nursing and Universal Needs, Nursing Concepts, Nutrition and Psychology. We had four tests last week and four next week . I get very discouraged at times. The teachers are trying to get us used to the NCLEX questions and it is hard to get used to thinking in that style. Sometimes I feel like throwing in the towel because it is very hectic with two little ones. In order to pass you have to have a 78% in each class. There are three semesters and you graduate in 11 months. Hang in there everyone and I will try to do the same. I heard that the LPN classes in Kentucky are a breeze....
  13. by   caliotter3
    The key to succeeding in any program is to keep up on a daily basis and to develop and utilize a surefire way to keep organized. It would have been to your advantage to have been able to take the prerequisite courses, like A&P, prior to the nursing component, but you have to work the program the way they have it set up. When you get ready to bridge over to RN (if you do), make certain that you have as many required courses completed before you start the nursing part. It really lightens the load. Hang in there and good luck.

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