Why Does It Seem That RN's Hate Us and Hospitals Don't Believe In Us?? - page 12

Im a new PN grad and have been a STNA (state tested nurse assistant) for 7 years; but as a graduate it seems that RN's are threatened by PN's or feel that we don't know anything and hospitals dont... Read More

  1. by   tammy10221961
    I'm a CNA, CST, EMT-B, Certified for CPR, LPN student. I have worked in long term and hospital environments. I understand the RN's have more education, have paid more for education, makes more than LPN's, CNA's etc.. But they have more responsibilitiy on their shoulders.
    A situtation I found myself in, as a CNT, EMT-B, Tech, whatever you want to call me, was that in the ER when an ambulance was brought in the Paramedics wanted to give me report. They thought that I was an RN even though they could see my name badge if they looked. I had to tell them over and over again that I could not take report, they had to wait for an RN.
    I have years experience as a tech, paid attention to my fellow co-workers, was trained for DC IV, DC cardiac caths, mini-catherization, foley insertion on male and females, l know sterile techniques, etc...The way I look at is this experience will help me with nursing school and once I have those "initials" behind my name I will be paid what I'm worth. Until that time comes I am happy to assist and expand my knowledge base.
    All nurses should work together for the benefit of the patient.
  2. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from lnalbc
    It has been my experience of 8 plus years that it is not a LPN vs. RN problem but rather a state to state problem. If you logically think about this paramedics can intubate, do IV push and other critical measures. However, the nurse because we all nurses are held down with what I feel is lack of continuity. There was a time that LPN's could do IV push and various other duties but now the educated push has been to limit one group of nurses. Why is this I have asked myself where the state allows paramedics to do many of the things that nurses should do with a very limited knowledge base. That is why I feel there is a such a nursing shortage. It has been my pleasure to work with many RN's who have only enhanced my knowledge base in so many ways as well as those experienced LPN's who have shared their knowledge as well. My belief has always been in nurses supporting nurses as one entity. It is only then can the LPN truely transition in the work force and enhance the quality of care. No one unit is an entity by itself. RN's learn from LPN and vice/versa, it is an ongoing exchange between two qualified persons that only serves to provide quality care.
    Paramedics certainly do not have a limited knowledge base. Have you actually worked with paramedics, e.g. in an ED setting? Please don't denigrate another profession to try to elevate yours.

    If you or someone you love has a life-threatening emergency, it's going to be those paramedics with their "limited knowledge" who respond to your 911 call.
  3. by   Avelinne
    I work alongside RN's as an LPN in AZ and I have never felt inferior working alongside them. I have felt empowered when an RN has asked me to collaborate on a particular patients care, Iv start, cath a hard patient, etc. You have to feel secure in the knowledge that you have and fill your LPN/LVN shoes by standing tall. The mutual respect will come when you are able to demonstrate what you know. You won't be able to please every RN all of the time, they are just human like you and I. They have the added stress of having to oversee the LPN/LVN according to the state board of nursing. This can be annoying to some. Know that you are an important part of the nursing team and whoever does not respect that is probably someone to avoid anyway.
  4. by   ns lpn
    I do not live in the USA but i am an LPN. I know here in Canada you run in to some RN's who do not like or appreciate their LPN/LVN's. Sometimes its because of past experience, sometimes it's a personal issue but as a professional you need to deal with it as best as you can and sometimes you can change another persons attitude just by being the best you can be....and then sometimes not, but try not to take it personally.
    The pay rate you have sucks as does the RN's you work with typically the RN will make 5-10$ more that an LPN and I think that is fair. I have CCA's who work under my supervision that go to school for almost a year and they make almost 1/2 what I do and I see LPN's treat some of them terribly b/c ??? **** goes downhill I quess.
    Our hospitals hire LPN's and give po meds, chart , admit, assess...everything but start an IV and for the most part are treated well. The RN has the added responsibility of being responsible for the LPN's and the unit.

    I think if I went back to school for another 2-4yrs to get my BS in nursing I would expect to be paid a lot more than a person who went to school for 1-2 years. I think a nursing degree gives you more knowledge to base pratical experience on, where the LPN program gives you a lot of practical experience based on a limited amount of knowledge (this is just a thought I have -it may not be accurate and is not ment to offend).
  5. by   RN34TX
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    Im not sure why your LMAO cause Texas nurses have the ability to make this hourly range. I have no clue where the tri state area is but I am willing to bet that your cost of living is much higher than here where I am from... so it just about evens out.
    The tri-state area refers to the NYC metro area because the city and all of its suburbs are located in three states (NY,NJ, and CT).
    And now that you know the area that was being referred to, I'm sure you've figured out that your guess about it having a high cost of living is correct.

    People in expensive areas sometimes like to brag about their high wages but those wages will often buy little more than a tiny apartment in Manhattan or a small home 50+ miles out of a big city in CA.
  6. by   Coloradogrl
    Quote from RN34TX
    The tri-state area refers to the NYC metro area because the city and all of its suburbs are located in three states (NY,NJ, and CT).
    And now that you know the area that was being referred to, I'm sure you've figured out that your guess about it having a high cost of living is correct.

    People in expensive areas sometimes like to brag about their high wages but those wages will often buy little more than a tiny apartment in Manhattan or a small home 50+ miles out of a big city in CA.
    I think I will take a house in Fort Worth....or atleast that is the plan!
  7. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    People in expensive areas sometimes like to brag about their high wages but those wages will often buy little more than a tiny apartment in Manhattan or a small home 50+ miles out of a big city in CA.
    Yep, the higher the wager, the higher the cost of living usually.
  8. by   aka_steven
    I haven't read all the posts her (there's 15 pages), But I've just got to say...
    I've been an LPN in NY, & VA. Never worked in a hospital,.. 3 yrs in home care, 6 in Internal Med./ Family Practice.
    I guess I've been lucky, I've never had a problem w/ any RN's. They have all treated me & my fellow lpns great (ma's for that matter also).
    I guess I've been part of really good TEAMs.
  9. by   mixyplixy
    Hi..I am an RN in California and have no idea what a PN is...could you enlighten me?
  10. by   Nurse`Chief~Chickie
    Quote from mixyplixy
    hi..i am an rn in california and have no idea what a pn is...could you enlighten me?


    an lpn is a licensed practical nurse, the same as lvns in ca.
  11. by   Nurse`Chief~Chickie
    Quote from lnalbc
    it has been my experience of 8 plus years that it is not a lpn vs. rn problem but rather a state to state problem.

    this is along the lines of what i've been thinking. perhaps someone can enlighten me; do an rns duties vary from state to state like lpns do? here i can do everything involved in blood admin except for literally spiking the bag. i can monitor and adjust pcas with additional employers education. i can stop a chemo infusion if i see an adverse reaction. plus other things i've seen by lpns that they can't do, and i can't do some things that can be done in other states. why is it that these things vary so widely btwn states? anyone know?
  12. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from mixyplixy
    Hi..I am an RN in California and have no idea what a PN is...could you enlighten me?
    California and Texas refer to their basic nurses as LVNs (licensed practical nurses).

    The other 48 states refer to their basic nurses as LPNs (licensed practical nurses).

    LPN and LVN are exactly the same type of nurse, but with different names due to geographical reasons.
  13. by   brendamyheart
    [quote=nurse educate]you know, either i'm going crazy (which is highly likely ), or this thread is!! i'm getting e-mails with replies that are not showing up (very nasty ones, i might add). are they being deleted by the mods

    at any rate, this thread is turning insane why do people have to get so nasty about this subject? a friendly debate is one thing, but c'mon... some of you guys really need to grow up. some of these slanderous remarks (if anyone else can see them) are not based on anything. name-calling?? and based on some of these responses, i think we've answered the original question (but still haven't answered why).

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