Which road to take? LPN or RN? - page 2

Hi, I'm a freshman at a local college in Colorado Springs going for my nursing degree. I've been working on getting my pre-reqs out of the way so I can get on the waiting list for nursing school.... Read More

  1. by   Fiona59
    If I were young, I'd do the RN.

    But in my late 40's I'm content in what I do. I don't want to do homework and go to school full time. I want to be able to go on vacation with the husband or my best friend when I want to.

    So, right now, I'm a content LPN, that travels, takes the odd university course (i've got enough credits to enter the bridge at any time but I think I'm going after a nice useless literature degree:chuckle ), and enjoys life. I never thought I'd admit that.

    I wanted to be a nurse out of high school but my mother talked me out of it. I've been many things since then, and many places. (Secretary, mother, volunteer, library aide)

    My provincial guidelines are more generous than others, no I can't work NICU but have never had the desire to. I work in womens health and LTC. I'm responsible for my own practice, report back to the charge, and no RN is responsible for my meds or assessments.

    The thing is find what is right for you. Its your life and you only get once chance at it.

    Good Luck
  2. by   Roozeyk
    Quote from kbean04
    Hi, I'm a freshman at a local college in Colorado Springs going for my nursing degree. I've been working on getting my pre-reqs out of the way so I can get on the waiting list for nursing school. Right now I'm in A&P 1 and not doing so hot! Originally I planned on becoming a RN, but since this class I've started to look at all my options. I've struggled with the Biology classes, but this one is killing me!
    Right now I'm leaning towards LPN - what's your view on that? I'm afraid I'm going to fail or not pass with a C in my A&P class. I've been advised that if I feel that way that I should withdraw. If I do withdraw I'm thinking about taking the basic A&P class which is required for the LPN program. Once I have that class done I would be put on the list. Since there is a waiting list and since I have to be a full time student - for insurance, I would then fill my time up with getting CNA certified and also would retake the A&P classes. Would taking that basic Anatomy help me in taking A&P the second time? I'm not sure if this is the right thing to do. It seems somewhat logical to me, except I know LPN's are not hired as much as an RN - in hospitals especially, which is what I want to work in. During my senior year of high school last year, I participated in a program at Memorial Hospital called Learning Link. From that experience I discovered a true passion for working in the neonatal unit. While doing a rotation I talked to a nurse who told me about the CNA program and how if I got certified and then went to work at Memorial they would guarantee me a job out of nursing school. With that in mind - if I did pursue the LPN program and after becoming a CNA, would I still have that job at Memorial? I do also understand that LPN's are a step under RN's so they can't be in charge like an RN would, but honestly I'm not concerned about that. I just want to be able to give the bedside care and procedures in a hospital. Please give me any advise! Thank
    RN...just do it! I doubt you will regret it.
  3. by   imn2nursing
    Go straight for your RN. My personal opinion is that the bridge program isn't all it's cracked up to be. All I have got to skip with the other students in the program is Fundamentals 1 and 2. I had to have all the same prerequisites and that took about a year and a half. My advice would be to get a tutor for anatomy. As an LPN for 8 years, my career choices is so limited. I would love to work in the ER or ICU but my hospital only has RN's in that area. There is just so many more opportunities.
  4. by   imn2nursing
    Quote from imn2nursing
    Go straight for your RN. My personal opinion is that the bridge program isn't all it's cracked up to be. All I have got to skip with the other students in the program is Fundamentals 1 and 2. I had to have all the same prerequisites and that took about a year and a half. My advice would be to get a tutor for anatomy. As an LPN for 8 years, my career choices is so limited. I would love to work in the ER or ICU but my hospital only has RN's in that area. There is just so many more opportunities.
    I'm sorry that is this time in school--- the prerequisites stuff. 14 years ago (before I got my LPN I started for my RN) and took almost 2 years of classes. Alot of those have been eliminated from the program now, so I have alot of useless classes. Anyway, I have four semesters in the BSN program. Good luck in all you do.
  5. by   mcorrao77
    I think you should go for the RN, BS in Nursing. I'm in an accelerated program in New York where I will have my BS in Nursing within one year. I don't know why anyone would not want to further their education especially while they're young!

    You can do it! I realized that I wouldn't have a life for a year while participating in my program and now looking back on it I'm glad I decided to do it. I only have 3 more months until I graduate with my second BS degree and I'm under 30 yr.

    GO FOR THE RN!!
  6. by   viking woman
    Hello Colorado Springs! I'm up here in Wyoming.....
    Can I assume that you are right out of HS? I only ask because if you were in your late 20's+ then I would also assume that you have had some time working under your belt. I hope that you're not like my 18 yr. old college student/daughter and YELL at me for discussing your age Anyway, allow me to share the benefit and wisdom of my old age and experience as an LPN for these last 13 yrs. I come from a 'nursing' family (and radiology techs) and became a CNA when I was newly married, hurt my back, quit. After having our daughter, I got the bug to change careers and went to our local LPN program. Mom is an RN and really encouraged that, but no program close by. You can a wonderful career and make decent money as an LPN, but do your homework and take into consideration your personality type and your career goals! LPNs, as a profession are task oriented, the 'doers'. In California LPN's do ALMOST everything the RN's do; what a shocker for me moving to Wyoming and going back to the dark ages! RN's are the ones doing the care plans and alot of administrative paperwork AND get the big pay too! After 13 yrs. I am getting off the proverbial pot and finishing my RN. I have dinked around with classes for too many years. I have worked MD offices, nursing homes, senior centers as a case manager and writing grants and some home health. My health and back are failing, I have more to offer than pushing nasty pills to old folks and my passion is holistic health. So, to achieve my personal goals I need to have an RN, so that I can get my BSN, so that I can join the American Holistic Nurses Assn. and begin my own business. So my dear, think down the road, look at career trends (what's hot in nursing) and your own passions...that one is the MOST important because you passion is what will keep you getting up each day when the world at work sucks!
    As for the A&P....get a tutor NOW! Trust me, DO IT NOW, do not put off the A&P and biology etc. It is so much easier now when you are young and unattached, no kids, no mortgage etc. I KNOW WHAT I AM TALKING ABOUT! All you need is a 'C'...you can do that. Get your CNA so you can get a taste of the hospital or nursing home BUT DO NOT RUIN YOUR BACK! Ask for help. You're going to get labeled as a pain in the a** for not being super CNA and just picking up all those 300 lb. guys by yourself! Too bad. Always protect yourself!!!! I think anyone wanting to be a nurse should have to be a CNA first! My CNA's are part of my team and we work together. I am not too good to clean up a resident or help feed or pick up trays. It is all part of patient care.
    Good luck and let us know how you fare.
    Quote from kbean04
    Hi, I'm a freshman at a local college in Colorado Springs going for my nursing degree. I've been working on getting my pre-reqs out of the way so I can get on the waiting list for nursing school. Right now I'm in A&P 1 and not doing so hot! Originally I planned on becoming a RN, but since this class I've started to look at all my options. I've struggled with the Biology classes, but this one is killing me!
    Right now I'm leaning towards LPN - what's your view on that? I'm afraid I'm going to fail or not pass with a C in my A&P class. I've been advised that if I feel that way that I should withdraw. If I do withdraw I'm thinking about taking the basic A&P class which is required for the LPN program. Once I have that class done I would be put on the list. Since there is a waiting list and since I have to be a full time student - for insurance, I would then fill my time up with getting CNA certified and also would retake the A&P classes. Would taking that basic Anatomy help me in taking A&P the second time? I'm not sure if this is the right thing to do. It seems somewhat logical to me, except I know LPN's are not hired as much as an RN - in hospitals especially, which is what I want to work in. During my senior year of high school last year, I participated in a program at Memorial Hospital called Learning Link. From that experience I discovered a true passion for working in the neonatal unit. While doing a rotation I talked to a nurse who told me about the CNA program and how if I got certified and then went to work at Memorial they would guarantee me a job out of nursing school. With that in mind - if I did pursue the LPN program and after becoming a CNA, would I still have that job at Memorial? I do also understand that LPN's are a step under RN's so they can't be in charge like an RN would, but honestly I'm not concerned about that. I just want to be able to give the bedside care and procedures in a hospital. Please give me any advise! Thank
  7. by   HazelLPN
    I'll tell you the same thing I told my grandaughter who wanted to become an LPN because she wanted to start working sooner.

    Get your BSN. I have had a wonderful career as an LPN. Ten years in med/surg and nearly 40 years in ICU. However, I was always happy just being nurse who took care of the patients without any desire to move up into administration or do anything else. Things change, people change...and you never know what curve balls life will throw at you. The BSN gives you the most options. It in no way makes you a better bedside nurse. I am from the school of thought that good nursing comes from experience on the job and a willingness to learn new things and care for people.

    My grandaughter did get her BSN and graduated Cum Laude (more information than you need to know...but I'm just so proud of her). She landed a job before she even graduated in Med/Surg. She then moved onto OB for a year and did a brief stint in CCU. Beside nursing wasn't her thing. Now she sells pharmaceuticals and make more money than I ever will...and gets a free car to drive and free trips. Last year she and her partner went to Hawaii for a week for free because her sales were so good. Blood money for the big drug companies if you ask me, but maybe I'm just sore than she didn't take me with them.....

    So honey....listen to Granny. Suck it up and start hitting the books harder..learn how to study or get a tutor. Many colleges have tutoring centors on campus where peers can help you for free and learning specialists can help you learn to study. Take advantage of those programs...they come out of your tuition after all. If you like beside nursing , you can stay in it until you're 115 like me....or you can find something else to do. If you are an LPN..your options are much more limited.

    Good luck

    Mrs. H.
  8. by   mcorrao77
    Quote from viking woman
    Hello Colorado Springs! I'm up here in Wyoming.....
    Can I assume that you are right out of HS? I only ask because if you were in your late 20's+ then I would also assume that you have had some time working under your belt. I hope that you're not like my 18 yr. old college student/daughter and YELL at me for discussing your age Anyway, allow me to share the benefit and wisdom of my old age and experience as an LPN for these last 13 yrs. I come from a 'nursing' family (and radiology techs) and became a CNA when I was newly married, hurt my back, quit. After having our daughter, I got the bug to change careers and went to our local LPN program. Mom is an RN and really encouraged that, but no program close by. You can a wonderful career and make decent money as an LPN, but do your homework and take into consideration your personality type and your career goals! LPNs, as a profession are task oriented, the 'doers'. In California LPN's do ALMOST everything the RN's do; what a shocker for me moving to Wyoming and going back to the dark ages! RN's are the ones doing the care plans and alot of administrative paperwork AND get the big pay too! After 13 yrs. I am getting off the proverbial pot and finishing my RN. I have dinked around with classes for too many years. I have worked MD offices, nursing homes, senior centers as a case manager and writing grants and some home health. My health and back are failing, I have more to offer than pushing nasty pills to old folks and my passion is holistic health. So, to achieve my personal goals I need to have an RN, so that I can get my BSN, so that I can join the American Holistic Nurses Assn. and begin my own business. So my dear, think down the road, look at career trends (what's hot in nursing) and your own passions...that one is the MOST important because you passion is what will keep you getting up each day when the world at work sucks!
    As for the A&P....get a tutor NOW! Trust me, DO IT NOW, do not put off the A&P and biology etc. It is so much easier now when you are young and unattached, no kids, no mortgage etc. I KNOW WHAT I AM TALKING ABOUT! All you need is a 'C'...you can do that. Get your CNA so you can get a taste of the hospital or nursing home BUT DO NOT RUIN YOUR BACK! Ask for help. You're going to get labeled as a pain in the a** for not being super CNA and just picking up all those 300 lb. guys by yourself! Too bad. Always protect yourself!!!! I think anyone wanting to be a nurse should have to be a CNA first! My CNA's are part of my team and we work together. I am not too good to clean up a resident or help feed or pick up trays. It is all part of patient care.
    Good luck and let us know how you fare.

    I totally agree with you about being a CNA first. I am so glad that I was a CNA for a year before I decided to go back to school to get my BSN. I feel that now I know what's it like from their aspect. AND I will never be one of those nurses that say, "That's what the aid does!" and not help. I think anyone who's remotely interested in nursing should be a CNA first. I also feel more ahead of the game when we started our clinicals. And I also agree on watching your back. If noone wants to help, I go to the next person. I'm 28 yrs old and have the rest of my life with only 1 back. I'll be graduating this August with my BSN and I'm so happy that I went that route and I did it in 1 year with an accelerated program!
  9. by   Sarahe23
    So, my question is... what is the difference between getting your ADN and your BSN? Where I am going to school, you finish a 10 month LPN program and then apply to matriculate in the (very competitive and often waitlisted) RN program, where you graduate with your Associate's in Nursing. Would it be better to transfer to a larger 4 year school to get a BSN degree? Are your options limited by only having an ADN as an RN?

    Thanks!

    Sarah


    Quote from HazelLPN
    I'll tell you the same thing I told my grandaughter who wanted to become an LPN because she wanted to start working sooner.

    Get your BSN. I have had a wonderful career as an LPN. Ten years in med/surg and nearly 40 years in ICU. However, I was always happy just being nurse who took care of the patients without any desire to move up into administration or do anything else. Things change, people change...and you never know what curve balls life will throw at you. The BSN gives you the most options. It in no way makes you a better bedside nurse. I am from the school of thought that good nursing comes from experience on the job and a willingness to learn new things and care for people.

    My grandaughter did get her BSN and graduated Cum Laude (more information than you need to know...but I'm just so proud of her). She landed a job before she even graduated in Med/Surg. She then moved onto OB for a year and did a brief stint in CCU. Beside nursing wasn't her thing. Now she sells pharmaceuticals and make more money than I ever will...and gets a free car to drive and free trips. Last year she and her partner went to Hawaii for a week for free because her sales were so good. Blood money for the big drug companies if you ask me, but maybe I'm just sore than she didn't take me with them.....

    So honey....listen to Granny. Suck it up and start hitting the books harder..learn how to study or get a tutor. Many colleges have tutoring centors on campus where peers can help you for free and learning specialists can help you learn to study. Take advantage of those programs...they come out of your tuition after all. If you like beside nursing , you can stay in it until you're 115 like me....or you can find something else to do. If you are an LPN..your options are much more limited.

    Good luck

    Mrs. H.
  10. by   mcorrao77
    Quote from Sarahe23
    So, my question is... what is the difference between getting your ADN and your BSN? Where I am going to school, you finish a 10 month LPN program and then apply to matriculate in the (very competitive and often waitlisted) RN program, where you graduate with your Associate's in Nursing. Would it be better to transfer to a larger 4 year school to get a BSN degree? Are your options limited by only having an ADN as an RN?

    Thanks!

    Sarah

    I think the difference with ADN vs. BSN is that if you ever want to further your education and get your Masters it's easier. Plus, many of the hospitals in major cities (New York City, for example) only want BSN grads. Plus you get more money with a BSN degree. Yeah, it might only be a dollar or two more an hour, but over time that adds up to thousands more than an ADN. I would tell anyone to get ther BSN, but that's just me. I fortunately have the opportunity to get my BSN in one year because of a previous BS degree that I have from my first college experience. So for me it didn't make sense to go two years and get my ADN when I can go 1 year and have my BSN. But it's up to the person. I hear pretty soon, New York wants to mandate nursing to BSN degrees only and the new grad ADN will have a period of time to get their BSN, and the "old" ADN will be grandfathered in. I just feel that the majority of health care workers (PT, OT, ect...) have to have at least their Bacherlors, why should the nurse be any different?

    But again, up to the person, to each his own.
    I don't think it makes for a better nurse per say, but I feel that I will have more opportunites with my BSN rather than ADN. The BSN degree takes more leadership, research, and communication skills courses than do the ADN.

    Hope this helps.

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