What is needed to become an LPN?

  1. 0
    Hello everyone,
    What classes are needed to become an Lpn? I am in a BSN program and I work with a lot of Lpn's that are going back to school for their RN. I was surprised that most of them are taking the exact same classes I am taking for my BSN program. I hear them say I just finished taking Med Surg or I am about to take Patho. I was under the impression that in order to become a nurse whether Lpn or Rn these classes had to be completed already.
  2. 4 Comments so far...

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    while both lpns and rns are considered nurses, there are significant differences between the two, starting with even the educational process.
    [color=windowtext]lpn programs traditionally encompass 12 to 18 months of curriculum after your pre-requisite classes are finished. depending on the college or lpn program, a student may have enough credits to earn an associate degree in health science, as well as complete the credits for the lpn program.
    in contrast, [color=windowtext]rn programs are three to five years in duration after pre-requisites are complete, and the student then earns an associate’s degree or a bachelor’s degree in nursing.
    however, what are the differences between a lpn and rn after the initial education?
    lpn and rn state licensure exams are different in complexity and in theory. the lpn exam focuses on patient care, while the rn exam is based upon the theories behind the care, as well as the care itself. both exams test on basic knowledge of disease processes, but the rn exam is more extensive in the pathophysiology of the disease processes, theory, and critical thinking skills.
    basically what’s need to begin an lpn program is to complete and pass the entrance exams, such as, but not limited too the net, tabe, hesi, teas (which ever the school/program requires), complete an interview to be selected into the program and pass the nclex-pn test in order to be license and work in the u.s.
    either way, the prospective lpns has to take the required courses as prospective rns, if they plan to further there education and specialty.
    Last edit by Getting To Great on Dec 27, '10
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    The courses really aren't the same. My daughter is in nursing school and had to take A&P I and II and other college-level sciences. The two lvn programs that I'm looking into only require one semester of A&P for allied health programs. Both have excellent pass rates on the NCLEX-PN, so I'm assuming whatever they are teaching is adequate for the test.

    Still, the program I favor starts with 22 semester hours of classes the first semester and is a full-time 40 hour a week program plus studying. I don't know how anyone could do this and work at the same time.
  5. 0
    Quote from dscott76
    Hello everyone,
    What classes are needed to become an Lpn? I am in a BSN program and I work with a lot of Lpn's that are going back to school for their RN. I was surprised that most of them are taking the exact same classes I am taking for my BSN program. I hear them say I just finished taking Med Surg or I am about to take Patho. I was under the impression that in order to become a nurse whether Lpn or Rn these classes had to be completed already.
    I attended a private, 12-month LVN/LPN program where students could get admitted without having completed any prerequisites. Everything (science classes, etc.) were rolled into the program.

    When I returned to school to pursue my RN license, I had to take A&P, English comp, and other prerequisites at my local community college because the LVN program that I had attended was not regionally accredited. Even though I am now an RN, I still have never taken a pathophysiology class, so this demonstrates that all nursing programs have different requirements.
  6. 1
    In addition to passing the entrance exam (the TEAS), a prospective student had to be a CNA prior to acceptance into my LPN program.
    prettyinblu likes this.


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