Three Questions....

  1. I've been trying to figure out answers to questions I have by reading the boards.... and most have been answered, also by personal messages. I just have about two or three more and then Ill know what to do with my choices in nursing... LPN, o RN or what.....

    Ok, I was wondering if I went to LPN school at night (is that possible? lol) when would I do the hospital part of learning, I think it's called clinicals? Would that part be in the day time?I have a daughter and she home schools, so I have to figure that out if that part of school is in the day time...

    Also, if I were an LPN in a nursing home, would I have to work as hard as a CNA there? I admire them and was thinking of doing that first, but my back isn't that great and I am alittle older than most, and thought maybe the LPN would do some but not as much?

    Also... And last... If I did LPN and then bridged over to RN, could I do the RN part online? Like only online, so I could be home with my daughter after work?

    I thank you very much for any answers. I don't know much, but after all these years, the yearning to be a nurse is still there and keeps popping up. So I want to go take care of it.
    Thanks so much for your time and all that.... Erin
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   tatgirl
    To answer your first question:
    Ok, I was wondering if I went to LPN school at night (is that possible? lol) when would I do the hospital part of learning, I think it's called clinicals? Would that part be in the day time?I have a daughter and she home schools, so I have to figure that out if that part of school is in the day time...

    I went to LPN school at night, and held down a full time job. Our clinicals during the weekdays were held at night at various facilities, and hospitals. We also attended clinicals every other weekend, and these were during the day.

    Answer to question 2:
    Also, if I were an LPN in a nursing home, would I have to work as hard as a CNA there? I admire them and was thinking of doing that first, but my back isn't that great and I am alittle older than most, and thought maybe the LPN would do some but not as much?

    Answer: I am a LPN in the LTC setting. If my CNA's are working and call lights go off, I go answer them (after my med pass is done. Unless I happen to be right there when the call light goes off.) I have also been known to help change residents, and feed them if we are short a CNA. If a resident needs to go back to bed, I always get help with that.

    Answer to question 3:
    Also... And last... If I did LPN and then bridged over to RN, could I do the RN part online? Like only online, so I could be home with my daughter after work?

    Answer:
    There are several online programs that can be done online. However there are clinicals etc that must be attended. Do your research, and get with the Board of Nursing in your state to make sure that they recognize online programs.

    Hope this helps!

    Wendy
    LPN
  4. by   traumaRUs
    I'm kinda coming in on the middle of this but here goes:

    1. Go straight for the RN if at all possible. You will have clinicals for both LPN and RN, so why not consolidate everything?

    2. Definitely get an idea about nursing before you go back to school. Get some type of health care or health-care related position prior to going to school. School is a huge investment in time and work to find in the end you don't like it.

    3. It's definitely possible to go to school part-time for almost any program - obviously it will take longer. Have you started pre-reqs? That can take a couple of years sometimes if you go part-time.

    4. Good luck.
  5. by   guislander
    I'm coming in on the other end of the previous post. I tried to go staight to my RN, and am ending up doing both any way. my school required us to get our CNA, so after I had it I worked in a nursing home the nurses there (which were almost all LPNs) were too busy with meds, treatments, tube feeding, insulin, etc to help much if at all with CNA work. I have since worked as a nurse tech/CNA at a hospital. LPNs there do almost all the CNA work. The hospital system in our city doesn't let LPNs do ANY nursing jobs in the medical setting, except maybe oral meds when they are very desparate. In mental health they are used to pass meds, and do 1 on1(which CNAs also do.) In there nursing home they do everything an RN does as long as one is in the building. The reason I got the LPN is I had things come up and couldn't finish right away. Iwanted something for all my work if I couldn't get back right away.
  6. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from guislander
    I'm coming in on the other end of the previous post. I tried to go staight to my RN, and am ending up doing both any way. my school required us to get our CNA, so after I had it I worked in a nursing home the nurses there (which were almost all LPNs) were too busy with meds, treatments, tube feeding, insulin, etc to help much if at all with CNA work. I have since worked as a nurse tech/CNA at a hospital. LPNs there do almost all the CNA work. The hospital system in our city doesn't let LPNs do ANY nursing jobs in the medical setting, except maybe oral meds when they are very desparate. In mental health they are used to pass meds, and do 1 on1(which CNAs also do.) In there nursing home they do everything an RN does as long as one is in the building. The reason I got the LPN is I had things come up and couldn't finish right away. Iwanted something for all my work if I couldn't get back right away.
    It is so shocking to me to see that LPNs are not permitted to administer medications in some states. If that is the case, what are your duties, and what did they teach you in school? I live in New York, and we medicate, hang piggy backs, and do basic nursing care in our hospital. I am not saying this as a criticism (please, take no offense, I don't mean it that way), it just shocks me! Medications is the bulk of most of our jobs that I know of. What did you learn to do?
  7. by   Coloradogrl
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    It is so shocking to me to see that LPNs are not permitted to administer medications in some states. If that is the case, what are your duties, and what did they teach you in school? I live in New York, and we medicate, hang piggy backs, and do basic nursing care in our hospital. I am not saying this as a criticism (please, take no offense, I don't mean it that way), it just shocks me! Medications is the bulk of most of our jobs that I know of. What did you learn to do?


    I am going to be starting a LVN program in Texas in the next few months & I was just curious how you find out state to state what a LPN/LVN can & cant do?

  8. by   EricJRN
    Quote from Coloradogrl
    I am going to be starting a LVN program in Texas in the next few months & I was just curious how you find out state to state what a LPN/LVN can & cant do?
    Best place to consult is the state's board of nursing. In Texas, the website is Board of Nurse Examiners for the State of Texas. You will find a lot of info there related to scope of practice and delegation issues. They should also cover it in detail in your program. Good luck.

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