Stand up if you're not in it for the money! - page 5

At 43, I'm a nursing student. Why am I doing this? It's because I have volunteered at a nursing home for two years, not including all the years as a child I visited a nursing home across the street... Read More

  1. by   nurse828
    I left a job in finance to become a nurse because I love taking care of people. I feel that I was born to be a nurse. I enjoy getting to know my patients and, in some cases, their families. Yes, people die & it is quite difficult to deal with but that's part of nursing. And, yes, the pay can be good but the pay in finance was good but the job wasn't fulfilling. I needed a career that made me feel like I made a contribution. I enjoy going back to work after a day off & having my patients say they missed me & how nice it is to see a smiling face. Nursing is probably the most demanding job..mentally & physically but for the right person it's also the most rewarding.
  2. by   Valerie Salva
    It seems there are more and more people coming into nursing who just don't care about anything but the paycheck.

    Yes, making a good living is an important reason one might consider nursing, but it should not be the only reason.
  3. by   Gromit
    well, all the 'good things' aside, I'd say that nobody gets into it just for the money -it doesn't pay THAT good to warrant that kind of thinking. You can certainly make better pay in other professions that aren't any harder to get degrees in than Nursing. That being said, I'm NOT in it as a 'hobby'. I expect to get paid regularly, and I expect to get the bread I'm owed for the hours I put in.
    Would I do it if there were no pay involved? No. Would any of you? If your employer suddenly told you that you would no longer be paid because (make a reason).. Would you still do the work?
    If you truly have no interest in the money -that is, if money really isn't a factor, then you can say yes. Personally, I don't know of ANY nurses, RNs, OR LPNs, who would say 'yes' to those conditions. Much as they (and I) care about their patients, they aren't willing to do it for free.
    I'm certainly not.
  4. by   interleukin
    Paradoxically, it is precisely those who are "in it for the money" who do more to help out our profession that those who feel a, "calling". It is music to administrators' ears when they hear the "calling" card announced. They know how "evil" money is and now you've proclaimed that you are not interested in such sordid issues.

    Listen, if you're a bad nurse--regardless of what your philosophy of renumeration is--you're a bad nurse and you should be shown the door. Period.

    But if you're worth your salt, you know that if you're not working hard as a nurse, you're not doing the job well. And if you're working hard as a nurse, you know that there should be no ceiling on salary because it is you who are the backbone and engine of any health care facility. It is you who will make or break the place. It is your face the public sees and it is that face that maintains or destroys the image of a facility. and it is you who are in danger of contracting a deadly or life-debilitating infection because you were rushing to get done the ever-increasing workload of tasks that they are demanding of you.

    If that is not equal to the responsibilities of the CEO then what is?

    NEVER diminish the power salary has on the image of many, many people and their esteem.

    And unless the currency of exchange in the USA becomes stones, sticks, and leaves, you'll one day wake up to realize your back-breaking good work and your insidiously eroding middle-class salary has left you with an very bitter taste and perhaps a new perspective on the rules of just compensation and equity.
  5. by   NC Girl BSN
    Definetly not in it for the money I make $20.00 an hour right now as a new grad in LTC and seriously considering applying to a local hospital making $14.00 not including shift diff. to get more experience. I say to myself, surely LPN's are worth more than that!
  6. by   TheCommuter
    Your post was well-articulated and nicely-worded, Interleukin. I couldn't have said it any better. Kudos to you!
    Quote from interleukin
    Paradoxically, it is precisely those who are "in it for the money" who do more to help out our profession that those who feel a, "calling". It is music to administrators' ears when they hear the "calling" card announced. They know how "evil" money is and now you've proclaimed that you are not interested in such sordid issues.

    Listen, if you're a bad nurse--regardless of what your philosophy of renumeration is--you're a bad nurse and you should be shown the door. Period.

    But if you're worth your salt, you know that if you're not working hard as a nurse, you're not doing the job well. And if you're working hard as a nurse, you know that there should be no ceiling on salary because it is you who are the backbone and engine of any health care facility. It is you who will make or break the place. It is your face the public sees and it is that face that maintains or destroys the image of a facility. and it is you who are in danger of contracting a deadly or life-debilitating infection because you were rushing to get done the ever-increasing workload of tasks that they are demanding of you.

    If that is not equal to the responsibilities of the CEO then what is?

    NEVER diminish the power salary has on the image of many, many people and their esteem.

    And unless the currency of exchange in the USA becomes stones, sticks, and leaves, you'll one day wake up to realize your back-breaking good work and your insidiously eroding middle-class salary has left you with an very bitter taste and perhaps a new perspective on the rules of just compensation and equity.
  7. by   Fiona59
    Quote from NC girl 35
    Definetly not in it for the money I make $20.00 an hour right now as a new grad in LTC and seriously considering applying to a local hospital making $14.00 not including shift diff. to get more experience. I say to myself, surely LPN's are worth more than that!
    When I see posts like yours my first thought is what??? I'm a nurse in Canada and PNs make the same irregardless of whether they are in LTC, Continuing Care, Active Treatment or Public Health Clinics.

    Then I remember, we are union and the vast majority of you aren't.

    Time to think union.
  8. by   Miss Cola
    I TOTALLY understand your feelings, I felt the same way in school! The way my classmates handled situations and how they acted in clinical settings made me see that not everyone is involved in nursing for love of the profession. These are the people that will not make it through, for one reason or another. I felt nauseated just thinking that nurses like them could one day possibly be taking care of my loved-ones! All you can do is keep doing what you are doing, stay caring, compassionate, and professional, and make sure that no one is mistreated when you are present. I have reported classmates that I had witnessed acting in such a way that was harmful to the patient. You got to do what you got to do. Treating the patient like a human-being is part of healthcare!!! I feel that many professionals forget this. At any rate, if u establish good rapport with the patient and they understand why you are there and that you care about their well-being, I would imagine it would be easier for you to do certain procedures on them. Good luck in school!
  9. by   Lexxie
    I personally would gladly give up my salary in LTC for lower-paying hospital experience. However the major hospital in my area doesn't hire LPNs and the others, the jobs are few and far between.
  10. by   BuffaloNurseAmy
    I went from making $19 an hour in LTC to $15.50 now in assisted living because frankly, I can't take the back breaking lifting, bending, long hours on my feet & stress of it anymore. I was coming home and taking 3 hour naps & neglecting my family from the feelings that I just couldn't do enough to help my residents in those 8 hours. The majority of my 12 years of LPN experience have been in LTC, some supervisory, and I only see it getting worse. I had to get out while the chance was there. Now in assisted living I have administrative issues. It seems to be the same everywhere. But my credo is the same: The RESIDENT comes FIRST...not the paperwork, not the timeclock, and as we all know, not our breaks!:chuckle
  11. by   interleukin
    Yes, The RESIDENT does comes FIRST...but for god's sake take you break and lunch.
    You make it harder for anyone else to take a break when you deny your own.
  12. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from interleukin
    Yes, The RESIDENT does comes FIRST...but for god's sake take you break and lunch.
    You make it harder for anyone else to take a break when you deny your own.
    So true. The patients and family members do not give a crap as to whether or not the nurse receives meal periods and potty breaks. You are the only person in the world who can adequately take care of you, because nobody else cares as much. The nurse can slip and fall in front of patients and family members without anyone else being too concerned.

    Therefore, use the bathroom, even if it means that a patient has to wait 10 minutes longer for their sleeping pill. Eat your lunch and stay hydrated, even if it means that you'll fall behind on treatments.
  13. by   chocokitten
    Quote from interleukin
    Yes, The RESIDENT does comes FIRST...but for god's sake take you break and lunch.
    You make it harder for anyone else to take a break when you deny your own.
    Exactly! I take my break and I get all my work done anyways. When I was in orientation my preceptor said something that I never expected him to say but I will always remember "Good nurses take their breaks" How can you provide safe, effecient, compassionate care with a full bladder, a rumbling tummy, low blood sugar and aching back/feet? sounds like the perfect recipe for a burned out bitter nurse
    I love my job, as a nurse. I went into this field because I feel that I can make a difference... but I also do it for the money, of course ^_^ I worked hard for my BSN and I expect my pay to reflect that... and level of quality care I continue to give my patients. Nurses are often pressured, in one way or another, to conform to the stereotype of the self-sacrificing caregiver (martyr???), however, this role does not benefit us as human beings nor does it help our patients, in the long run. Care for yourself first or you won't be around long enough to make a real difference!

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