Please help!!! LPN or RT???

  1. I really need help!!!

    I have came to a crossroad and really need help with deciding.

    I have the the oppertunity to either go to Respiratory Therapy school or enter a LPN program.

    The RT program is 16 months and then additional 24wks to become a RRT.

    The LPN program is 13 months and then I would "hope" to bridge over into the RN program. This would he a way I could "hope" to get into a RN program eventually and also be able to work.

    Any advice would be appericated!!! I really need it
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  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   DelanaRN
    I am so there in that boat with you.
    Good luck in your decision.
  4. by   Coloradogrl
    Quote from dconnors
    I am so there in that boat with you.
    Good luck in your decision.
    If you dont mind me asking what are you leaning towards?
  5. by   jamangel
    You know I would suggest that you do RT which I believe is at least an Associates degree. At least you may have a good bit of that core out of the way and you can do RN afterwards. Personally, I always encourage people away from LPN unless they just want to be a LPN. If RN is your dream don't baby step it by doing LPN first . Just an opinion :wink2: .
  6. by   Coloradogrl
    Quote from jamangel
    You know I would suggest that you do RT which I believe is at least an Associates degree. At least you may have a good bit of that core out of the way and you can do RN afterwards. Personally, I always encourage people away from LPN unless they just want to be a LPN. If RN is your dream don't baby step it by doing LPN first . Just an opinion :wink2: .
    Thanks so much:wink2: Yes, RT is a assoicates, but I have to ask you why you discourage people from going for LPN.
    I would love blunt honest answers....I need it at this point in my decision process!!!
  7. by   DelanaRN
    I think I am leaning towards LPN simply because there seems to be more jobs and because it is a step in the direction I really want to end up which is L&D and pre/postnatal. I think if I get the LPN out of the way, I can work Part time and then take LPN to RN classes online or get into a bridge program. I am so confused about this...and classes start in less than a month.

    What about you?
  8. by   Jules A
    Quote from jamangel
    You know I would suggest that you do RT which I believe is at least an Associates degree. At least you may have a good bit of that core out of the way and you can do RN afterwards. Personally, I always encourage people away from LPN unless they just want to be a LPN. If RN is your dream don't baby step it by doing LPN first . Just an opinion :wink2: .
    I wonder just how much transfers over with the associates in RT? It might be just as long to go from RT to RN as from LPN to RN. As an LPN I have almost all the pre-reqs done for the RN program anyway and so its only 2 semesters to bridge. I have zero regrets about doing LPN first especially because with RT you are limited to RT and with nursing there are almost unlimited opportunities.
  9. by   TheCommuter
    RT jobs tend to pay more than LPN jobs; however, there tends to be more nursing jobs available. If your goal is to become a nurse, why are you going to veer off the path by becoming a respiratory therapist first? It doesn't make a great deal of sense, unless you want to become a pulmonary nurse and would like the respiratory experience.
  10. by   Coloradogrl
    Quote from TheCommuter
    RT jobs tend to pay more than LPN jobs; however, there tends to be more nursing jobs available. If your goal is to become a nurse, why are you going to veer off the path by becoming a respiratory therapist first? It doesn't make a great deal of sense, unless you want to become a pulmonary nurse and would like the respiratory experience.
    Your absoultey right:wink2: I orginally was going to go in respiratory therapy because there really wasnt any waitlist and it was on "some levels" quick and easy at 22 months. Before I moved to Denver I didnt really know there was any LPN programs and I really didnt know to much about bridging over to RN. I thought it was on some levels "all or nothing"

    I know that making a dollar or to more a hour isnt a big deal if I am doing what I want as a career and that is begin a

    Side note....RT's can make 22 and even more when doing per deim but they are for the most of a time from 17-21 a hour(at least to start) they dont ever get to RN level or even close unless they are in a very special situation
  11. by   Little Panda RN
    If I was you, I would check with your local hospital and see if you can follow a RT and LPN for a shift or a few hours to get an idea of what each of them do. When I was in nursing school, during clinicals I had the chance to follow RT and I found it very exilerating. They really do have quite the job. It is focused of course on the respiratory system, but there is a lot to what they need to know. I think you would get a better idea of which way to go or which way feels best to you.
  12. by   Coloradogrl
    Quote from nd_mom
    If I was you, I would check with your local hospital and see if you can follow a RT and LPN for a shift or a few hours to get an idea of what each of them do. When I was in nursing school, during clinicals I had the chance to follow RT and I found it very exilerating. They really do have quite the job. It is focused of course on the respiratory system, but there is a lot to what they need to know. I think you would get a better idea of which way to go or which way feels best to you.
    I did shadow a RT when applying for the RT program. I also come from a BIG nursing family my mom in a NP and my aunt is a CNRA so I am fimilar with both. I think RT's have great jobs I am just scared with begin a RT I will always feel as if I "short cutted" myself. Atleast with LPN I can do a bridge program and slowly get to my goal(and I mean slowly because of all the darn waiting list! )
  13. by   jamangel
    I usually discourage folks from doing it who want to be a RN. It's a wasted year. Sometimes financial sistuations make getting the LPN a more viable option but if that's not your case then go for your RN. I speak from experience as far as regret goes. I regret wasting my time with it instead of going all the way.

    I will say this though, being a LPN taught me to respect all CNA's something I may or may not have taken the time to realize. I've had to be in the trenches with them and depending on where you work RN's don't have the care or concern to how much hands on work is involved.

    Also, every school is different but here, the RT and RN core is a lot similar give or take a few classes.
  14. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from nd_mom
    If I was you, I would check with your local hospital and see if you can follow a RT and LPN for a shift or a few hours to get an idea of what each of them do.
    The only problems posed by this 'shadowing' idea is the fact that many hospitals do not utilize LPNs anymore and, therefore, there might not be any LPNs to shadow at the local hospitals.

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