phasing out? - page 2

Hello I am six weeks into LPN school and when ever people see me in uniform and ask what I do, they tell me hospitals are going to start phasing LPNs out. These are people in healthcare that tell... Read More

  1. by   pcarpenter
    Sorry, but the handwriting is on the wall, and it has been for several years. LVNs will be phased out, especially in California. Management does not want to pay an LVN and then have to have an RN cover them in many procedures.
  2. by   postmortem_cowboy
    it sure does seem that way pcarpenter... which is why i'm on my way for my RN... seems to me soon it'll be more difficult than it already is to find a decent LVN position. I'm already feeling the sting of it now.


    Wayne.
  3. by   BigB
    Quote from pcarpenter
    Sorry, but the handwriting is on the wall, and it has been for several years. LVNs will be phased out, especially in California. Management does not want to pay an LVN and then have to have an RN cover them in many procedures.
    Phased out of acute hospitals ....yes.

    Phased out of prisons and LTC...no way. I can't see nursing homes staffed 100% with RN's...they can barley afford to pay the LVN's.
  4. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from pcarpenter
    Sorry, but the handwriting is on the wall, and it has been for several years. LVNs will be phased out, especially in California. Management does not want to pay an LVN and then have to have an RN cover them in many procedures.
    There are definitely problems with the LVN job market in California.

    1. New LVN grads are being churned out every 3 months from numerous private school programs, which floods the job market with new nurses. If the job market is flooded with LVNs, it depresses the overall LVN pay rates.

    2. The LVN scope of practice is very limited in California, which causes the RNs to have to oversee many procedures such as IV therapy.

    However, I don't think LVNs will be completely phased out in California. The job market is simply shifting to the point where LVNs are being utilized increasingly in long-term care, home health, correctional nursing, outpatient clinics, et cetera.
  5. by   pagandeva2000
    I strongly feel that it will shift again. It has for years. Sometimes, the need appears to be pro-RN, other times, pro-LPN. ABout 10 years ago, in my hospital, they laid off many RNs from the clinics and only had about two and had many LPNs. What happened was that their union intervened and brought up some skills that are only performed by RNs and now, we are about even with the amount of LPNs and RNs in our clinic. I can see that the opportunities for us may be limited in acute care, but there will always be a need for us in other areas. I totally understand what would motivate an LPN to become an RN, but those aren't personal motivators for me.
  6. by   linzz
    Yes this is true in many cases. It is true here in Canada in most provinces except for Alberta as they have more $$ than the other provinces due to oil reserves and better $ management. In Ontario, if you are an LPN you likely will work in LTC or home care. Very few hospitals hire LPN's anymore and if they do it is only for casual positions. The ones in the hospitals are very fearfule of losing their jobs and when they leave, they are replaced with an RN. This may be due to our gov't nurse initiative which provides funding for full time RN jobs. In Ontario, most clinics and Dr. offices prefer to hire RN's. I would love to remain an LPN but I don't have the energy to fight this fight.
  7. by   Fiona59
    Linzz, I don't think its a case of our economic well being. It's a case of good money and personnel management. Most geriatric day programmes don't need to be fully RN staffed, they run well with one RN and three PNs. Our Psych hospitals are starting to realize this as well and are hiring PNs as fast as they can find them.

    Never rule out casual positions, when I first started out I worked casual, gained a lot of useful experience, and worked more hours than some part-timers.

    The nursing shortage is there in both the PN and RN role. I've worked shifts where there should have been 10 floor nurses at a 50/50 split. In the end it was more like 3 RN and 7 PN on the floor working. Office work here is available and because they don't pay union wages, they are taking anyone with a license....
  8. by   linzz
    Yes I agree, it certainly is a situation of good financial management. I just wish it was done that way where I live. It should be because our hospitals are very far from being flush with $$. In fact, one of our hospitals has big issued right now with lack of $$. As for casual, I would take casual for sure, but as a new grad it is tough to even get that at many nursing homes and challenging at the hospital. I know it sounds bad but right now this area is in a very pro RN cycle but I doubt it will last due to shortages of RN's and $. Cheers.
  9. by   linzz
    Hey caliotter3, I think this is interesting that you mention this. I think that this is starting to happen more often. It just isn't noticed as much as some employers possibly are not openly posting that but are taking LPN's who are either working on RN's or the prereqs. Crazy world isn't it. :spin:
  10. by   kellsc
    Hi. I graduated the LPN program in August 06. I haven't worked as an LPN yet due to remodeling my home and recovering from a bunionectomy. During that time I have looked into positions but I have not found anything except in a LTC. I am so afraid that if I don't do something soon, I will forget the information that I attained in school. I can already tell that I've forgotten some things. Any ideas? I just thought there was so much more opportunity when I was taking the course. How should I go about looking for a job? Online, calling every doctor's office and hospital, door to door? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  11. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from kellsc
    How should I go about looking for a job? Online, calling every doctor's office and hospital, door to door? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    It seems that you are specifically seeking a position in a hospital or doctors' office. The vast majority of LPN job opportunities are to be found in nursing homes and other LTCFs.
  12. by   allantiques4me
    I dont think so,Ive never had an issue getting a job.And Ive been in the medical field for almost 30 years and way back then they were talking about phasing out LPNs.It seems there are a lot of positions for LPNs here in Ohio.
  13. by   spydercadet
    lpn's don't seem to have the opportunities they once did, especially in the acute care hospital setting. however, i believe that by getting your lpn you can work in ltc building your knowledge base and skill performance. then after you have your licensure and some experience you can apply to a rn program. in illinois, rn programs are really hard to get into, mostly because of a lack of msn’s to teach, but you’d be applying to a bridge program, which tend to have a more stable admission rates. so don’t listen to most people and just keep your eyes on your goals and then you can achieve anything.

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